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  1. Uncorking the muse: Alcohol intoxication facilitates creative problem solving.Andrew F. Jarosz, Gregory Jh Colflesh & Jennifer Wiley - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):487-493.
    That alcohol provides a benefit to creative processes has long been assumed by popular culture, but to date has not been tested. The current experiment tested the effects of moderate alcohol intoxication on a common creative problem solving task, the Remote Associates Test . Individuals were brought to a blood alcohol content of approximately .075, and, after reaching peak intoxication, completed a battery of RAT items. Intoxicated individuals solved more RAT items, in less time, and were more likely to perceive (...)
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  2.  15
    Cues to solution, restructuring patterns, and reports of insight in creative problem solving.Patrick J. Cushen & Jennifer Wiley - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1166-1175.
    While the subjective experience of insight during problem solving is a common occurrence, an understanding of the processes leading to solution remains relatively uncertain. The goal of this study was to investigate the restructuring patterns underlying solution of a creative problem, and how providing cues to solution may alter the process. Results show that both providing cues to solution and analyzing problem solving performance on an aggregate level may result in restructuring patterns that appear incremental. Analysis of performance on an (...)
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  3.  7
    What causes the insight memory advantage?Amory H. Danek & Jennifer Wiley - 2020 - Cognition 205 (C):104411.
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    Drunk, but not blind: The effects of alcohol intoxication on change blindness.Gregory Jh Colflesh & Jennifer Wiley - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):231-236.
    Alcohol use has long been assumed to alter cognition via attentional processes. To better understand the cognitive consequences of intoxication, the present study tested the effects of moderate intoxication on attentional processing using complex working memory capacity span tasks and a change blindness task. Intoxicated and sober participants were matched on baseline WMC performance, and intoxication significantly decreased performance on the complex span tasks. Surprisingly, intoxication improved performance on the change blindness task. The results are interpreted as evidence that intoxication (...)
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  5.  19
    On the processing of arguments.James F. Voss, Rebecca Fincher-Kiefer, Jennifer Wiley & Laurie Ney Silfies - 1993 - Argumentation 7 (2):165-181.
    This paper is concerned with the processing of informal arguments, that is, arguments involving “probable truth.” A model of informal argument processing is presented that is based upon Hample's (1977) expansion of Toulmin's (1958) model of argument structure. The model postulates that a claim activates an attitude, the two components forming a complex that in turn activates reasons. Furthermore, the model holds occurrence of the reason, or possibly the claim and the reason, activates values. Three experiments are described that provide (...)
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  6. Upsides and downsides of gesturing in problem solving.Patrick J. Cushen & Jennifer Wiley - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 775--780.
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  7.  13
    Anomalous Evidence, Confidence Change, and Theory Change.Joshua A. Hemmerich, Kellie Van Voorhis & Jennifer Wiley - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1534-1560.
    A novel experimental paradigm that measured theory change and confidence in participants' theories was used in three experiments to test the effects of anomalous evidence. Experiment 1 varied the amount of anomalous evidence to see if “dose size” made incremental changes in confidence toward theory change. Experiment 2 varied whether anomalous evidence was convergent or replicating. Experiment 3 varied whether participants were provided with an alternative theory that explained the anomalous evidence. All experiments showed that participants' confidence changes were commensurate (...)
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