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  1.  53
    On the Long Road to Mentalism in Children’s Spontaneous False-Belief Understanding: Are We There Yet?Jason Low & Bo Wang - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):411-428.
    We review recent anticipatory looking and violation-of-expectancy studies suggesting that infants and young preschoolers have spontaneous (implicit) understanding of mind despite their known problems until later in life on elicited (explicit) tests of false-belief reasoning. Straightforwardly differentiating spontaneous and elicited expressions of complex mental state understanding in relation to an implicit-explicit knowledge framework may be challenging; early action predictions may be based on behavior rules that are complementary to the mentalistic attributions under consideration. We discuss that the way forward for (...)
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  2.  5
    Visibly Constraining an Agent Modulates Observers' Automatic False-Belief Tracking.Jason Low, Katheryn Edwards & Stephen A. Butterfill - forthcoming - Scientific Reports.
    Our motor system can generate representations which carry information about the goals of another agent's actions. However, it is not known whether motor representations play a deeper role in social understanding, and, in particular, whether they enable tracking others' beliefs. Here we show that, for adult observers, reliably manifesting an ability to track another's false belief critically depends on representing the agent's potential actions motorically. One signature of motor representations is that they can be disrupted by constraints on an observed (...)
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    Level 2 Perspective-Taking Distinguishes Automatic and Non-Automatic Belief-Tracking.Katheryn Edwards & Jason Low - 2019 - Cognition 193:104017.
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    Mindreading in the Balance : Adults' Mediolateral Leaning and Anticipatory Looking Foretell Others' Action Preparation in a False-Belief Interactive Task.Giovanni Zani, Stephen A. Butterfill & Jason Low - 2020 - Royal Society Open Science 7.
    Anticipatory looking on mindreading tasks can indicate our expectation of an agent's action. The challenge is that social situations are often more complex, involving instances where we need to track an agent's false belief to successfully identify the outcome to which an action is directed. If motor processes can guide how action goals are understood, it is conceivable— where that kind of goal ascription occurs in false-belief tasks— for motor representations to account for someone's belief-like state. Testing adults in a (...)
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