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H. Egner [4]Heike Egner [1]
  1. On Climate Change Research, the Crisis of Science and Second-Order Science.P. Aufenvenne, H. Egner & K. Elverfeldt - 2014 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (1):120-129.
    Context: This conceptual paper tries to tackle the advantages and the limitations that might arise from including second-order science into global climate change sciences, a research area that traditionally focuses on first-order approaches and that is currently attracting a lot of media and public attention. Problem: The high profile of climate change research seems to provoke a certain dilemma for scientists: despite the slowly increasing realization within the sciences that our knowledge is temporary, tentative, uncertain, and far from stable, the (...)
     
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  2. Authors’ Response: Communicating Second-Order Science.P. Aufenvenne, H. Egner & K. Elverfeldt - 2014 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (1):135-139.
    Upshot: For communicating second-order science, von Foerster’s ethical imperative provides a viable starting point. Proceeding from this, we plead in favour of emphasising the common grounds of diverging scientific opinions and of various approaches in second-order science instead of focussing on the differences. This will provide a basis for communication and stimulate scientific self-reflection.
     
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  3. Who Observes? An Appropriate Theory of Observation is in Demand.H. Egner - 2012 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (1):12-13.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Between Realism and Constructivism? Luhmann’s Ambivalent Epistemological Standpoint” by Armin Scholl. Upshot: One of the key aspects of constructivism is the role of the observer. As Scholl shows in his article, Luhmann shares this perspective, and beyond that opens up the concept of observation by transferring it from the micro level of individuals to the macro level of society. Luhmann goes even further by stating that all autopoietic and self-referential systems, i.e., all living, psychic, (...)
     
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  4. “Believe It or Not!” - It’s About the Truth in Science.H. Egner - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (2):221-222.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Ontology, Reality and Construction in Niklas Luhmann’s Theory” by Krzysztof C. Matuszek. Upshot: On an epistemological level, Matuszek argues convincingly that Luhmann’s epistemological ambiguities could be embedded in a coherent constructivist approach. However, what do we gain by being assured of this and why is it so difficult to tolerate ambiguities in an otherwise highly elaborated theory?
     
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  5.  4
    Neither Realism nor Anti-Realism: How to Approach the Anthropocene?Heike Egner - 2017 - In Katharina Neges, Josef Mitterer, Sebastian Kletzl & Christian Kanzian (eds.), Realism - Relativism - Constructivism: Proceedings of the 38th International Wittgenstein Symposium in Kirchberg. De Gruyter. pp. 153-166.
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