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  1.  24
    Dying is Hard to Describe: Metonymies and Metaphors of Death in the Iliad.Fabian Horn - 2018 - Classical Quarterly 68 (2):359-383.
    Homer'sIliadis an epic poem full of war and battles, but scholars have noted that ‘[t]he Homeric poems are interested in death far more than they are in fighting’. Even though long passages of the poem, particularly the so-called ‘battle books’ (Il.Books 5–8, 11–17, 20–2), consist of little other than fighting, individual battles are often very short with hardly ever a longer exchange of blows. Usually, one strike is all it takes for the superior warrior to dispatch his opponent, and death (...)
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  2.  11
    ‘Sleeping the Brazen Slumber’ – A Cognitive Approach to Hom. Il. 11.241.Fabian Horn - 2015 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 159 (2):197-206.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Philologus Jahrgang: 159 Heft: 2 Seiten: 197-206.
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  3.  6
    Order from Chaos.Fabian Horn - 2016 - Hermes 144 (2):124-137.
    This article attempts to explain the structure of the eponymous ecphrasis in the Pseudo-Hesiodic “Shield of Heracles” as a programme outlining an evolution from violent chaos to peaceful order which corresponds to the function initially ascribed to Heracles as ‘protector against ruin for gods and men’ (Sc. 28-9). It will be argued that the seemingly disproportionate ecphrasis is a conscious reworking of the Homeric shield of Achilles employed as a literary device to give a cosmic dimension to the battle between (...)
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    The Casualties of the Latin Iliad.Fabian Horn - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):767-773.
    The so-calledLatin Iliad, the main source for the knowledge of the Greek epic poem in the Latin West during the Middle Ages, is a hexametric poetic summary (epitome) of Homer'sIliadlikely dating from the Age of Nero, which reduces the 15,693 lines of the original to a mere 1,070 lines (6.8%).
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  5.  13
    The Psychology of Aggression: Achilles’ Wrath and Hector’s Flight in Iliad 22.131–7.Fabian Horn - 2018 - Hermes 146 (3):277.
    Considering his status as the best fighter on the Trojan side, Hector’s flight in “Iliad” 22.131-7 is unexpected and surprising, even though Hector is never overtly reproached for his reaction. This article proposes a psychological explanation for Hector’s behaviour, drawing on recent insights concerning combat stress reaction (CSR) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Hector does not flee from fear of death, but from the “Wind of Hate”, i. e. the terror felt when confronted with direct and personal aggression. An examination (...)
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    Zur Häufung von Kulttiteln in Lykophrons Alexandra.Fabian Horn - 2021 - Hermes 149 (2):166.
    Lycophron’s riddling poem “Alexandra” is infamous for hardly ever calling anything by its proper name, but rather employing obscure and erudite metaphors, periphrases, and mythological allusions for people and events as well as local cult epithets for divinities. This article attempts to explain the fact that epithets for gods occur only rarely in isolation, but usually in clusters ranging from two to six different appellations. Assuming that this repetition of information is not merely empty redundancy, Hellenistic extravagance, or an ostentatious (...)
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