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  1.  35
    Beyond ‘Revenge Porn’: The Continuum of Image-Based Sexual Abuse.Clare McGlynn, Erika Rackley & Ruth Houghton - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (1):25-46.
    In the last few years, many countries have introduced laws combating the phenomenon colloquially known as ‘revenge porn’. While new laws criminalising this practice represent a positive step forwards, the legislative response has been piecemeal and typically focuses only on the practices of vengeful ex-partners. Drawing on Liz Kelly’s pioneering work, we suggest that ‘revenge porn’ should be understood as just one form of a range of gendered, sexualised forms of abuse which have common characteristics, forming what we are conceptualising (...)
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  2.  17
    Image-Based Sexual Abuse.Clare McGlynn & Erika Rackley - 2017 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 37 (3):534-561.
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  3. Seeking Justice and Redress for Victim-Survivors of Image-Based Sexual Abuse.Erika Rackley, Clare McGlynn, Kelly Johnson, Nicola Henry, Nicola Gavey, Asher Flynn & Anastasia Powell - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (3):293-322.
    Despite apparent political concern and action—often fuelled by high-profile cases and campaigns—legislative and institutional responses to image-based sexual abuse in the UK have been ad hoc, piecemeal and inconsistent. In practice, victim-survivors are being consistently failed: by the law, by the police and criminal justice system, by traditional and social media, website operators, and by their employers, universities and schools. Drawing on data from the first multi-jurisdictional study of the nature and harms of, and legal/policy responses to, image-based sexual abuse, (...)
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  4.  38
    Detailing Judicial Difference.Erika Rackley - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):11-26.
    In January 2004 Baroness Brenda Hale became the first woman to sit on the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords. Five years on, she has brought to her judicial role a lightness of touch that belies her increasingly significant impact on the court’s jurisprudence. Early forecasts that she would be “just a bit different” from her male companions have proved prophetic. However such assessments have stemmed primarily from a focus on her decision-making on a case-by-case basis. But what of (...)
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  5.  5
    The Case for Feminist Legal History.Erika Rackley & Rosemary Auchmuty - 2020 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 40 (4):878-904.
    While we may be witnessing a highpoint of interest in the lives of early women lawyers, and women’s legal history generally, feminist legal history remains largely undeveloped in the UK. Drawing on examples of women’s representation in and engagement with law and law reform in the UK and Ireland, this article delineates the method, scope and purpose of feminist legal history. It begins by exploring the place of women in traditional accounts of legal history, before going on to consider the (...)
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  6.  18
    Clare McGlynn, The Woman Lawyer – Making the Difference.Erika Rackley - 1999 - Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):343-346.
  7.  12
    Reassessing Portia: The Iconic Potential ofShakespeare's Woman Lawyer. [REVIEW]Erika Rackley - 2003 - Feminist Legal Studies 11 (1):25-44.
    This paper considers the adoption ofPortia, the heroine of The Merchant ofVenice, by feminist legal scholars as ametaphor for the woman lawyer. It suggests thatPortia has both captured and is captured by thefeminist legal scholar's imagination, becomingat once an idol, myth and icon. She is to somethe personification of the woman lawyer'sperceived difference, a mouthpiece for mercyand `the different voice' and to others, a shamor myth, her idolised reputation sullied, her`difference' rejected. Yet ultimately thisconstant and simultaneous idolisation andvilification of Portia (...)
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  8.  12
    Sandra Berns, To Speak as a Judge – Difference, Voice and Power.Erika Rackley - 2001 - Feminist Legal Studies 9 (1):89-91.
  9. Auchmuty, Rosemary, 263 Biggs, Hazel, 171 Burton, Mandy, 247 Chaplin, Sue, 199.Man Chung Chiu, Davina Cooper, A. Diduck, Katherine Doolin, Peter Goodrich, Daphna Hacker, Catherine Hobby, K. Keywood, Katherine O’Donovan & Erika Rackley - 2001 - Feminist Legal Studies 9 (275).
     
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