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  1.  4
    Understanding the Present: Science and the Soul of Modern Man.Bryan Appleyard - 1992 - Doubleday.
    In a brilliant and explosively controversial work, the author attacks modern science for destroying our spiritual sense of self. What is the role of science in present-day society? Should we be as dazzled as we are by the innovations, the insights, and the miraculous improvements in material life that science has wrought? Or is there a darker, more pernicious side to our scientific success? Renowned British science columnist Bryan Appleyard thoroughly explores each of these provocative topics in a book that (...)
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  2.  23
    Understanding the Present: An Alternative History of Science.Bryan Appleyard - 2004 - Distributed in the U.S.A. And in Canada by Palgrave Macmillan.
    This is an important work, which demands that we sit up and take notice of the ever-increasing effects of science on the way we live our lives. In this thrilling and compelling exploration of the human condition, Brian Appleyard exposes the central role of science in shaping our lives and our beliefs, tracing the history of science from Copernicus, Newton, and Descartes to Einstein, Feynman, and Hawking. He argues that the birth of environmentalism and the diminished importance of religion and (...)
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  3.  5
    Popular Culture and Public Affairs.Bryan Appleyard - 2000 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 45:97-104.
    Recently I saw a corporate TV advertisement for the American television network ABC. It showed brief shots of people in other countries—France, Japan, Russia and so on. These people were doing all kinds of things, but they weren't watching television. Americans, the commentary told us, watch more TV than any of these people. Yet America is the richest, most innovative, most productive nation on the planet. ‘A coincidence’, concluded the wry, confident voice, ‘we don't think so’.
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