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  1. How Real Is the Reality in Documentary Film? Jill Godmilow, in Conversation with Ann-Louise Shapiro.Ann-Louise Shapiro - 1997 - History and Theory 36 (4):80–101.
    Documentary film, in the words of Bill Nichols, is one of the "discourses of sobriety" that include science, economics, politics, and history-discourses that claim to describe the "real," to tell the truth. Yet documentary film, in more obvious ways than does history, straddles the categories of fact and fiction, art and document, entertainment and knowledge. And the visual languages with which it operates have quite different effects than does the written text. In the following interview conducted during the winter of (...)
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    How Real Is the Reality in Documentary Film? Jill Godmilow, in Conversation with Ann-Louise Shapiro.Ann-Louise Shapiro - 1997 - History and Theory 36 (4):80-101.
    Documentary film, in the words of Bill Nichols, is one of the "discourses of sobriety" that include science, economics, politics, and history-discourses that claim to describe the "real," to tell the truth. Yet documentary film, in more obvious ways than does history, straddles the categories of fact and fiction, art and document, entertainment and knowledge. And the visual languages with which it operates have quite different effects than does the written text. In the following interview conducted during the winter of (...)
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  3.  21
    Fixing History: Narratives of World War I in France.Ann-Louise Shapiro - 1997 - History and Theory 36 (4):111–130.
    For nearly a century, the French have entertained an unshakable conviction that their ability to recognize themselves-to know and transmit the essence of Frenchness-depended on the teaching of the history of France. In effect, history was a discourse on France, and the teaching of history-"la pédagogie centrale du citoyen"-the means by which children were constituted as heirs and carriers of a common collective memory that made them not only citizens, but family. In this essay, I examine the rhetorical and conceptual (...)
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    Whose (Which) History is It Anyway?Ann-Louise Shapiro - 1997 - History and Theory 36 (4):1–3.
  5.  14
    Understanding the Great War by Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau and Annette Becker.Ann-Louise Shapiro - 2005 - History and Theory 44 (1):91–101.
  6.  13
    Introduction: History and Feminist Theory, or Talking Back to the Beadle.Ann-Louise Shapiro - 1992 - History and Theory 31 (4):1-14.