Augustine and the Disciplines: From Cassiciacum to Confessions

Oxford University Press UK (2005)
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Abstract

Augustine and the Disciplines takes its cue from Augustine's theory of the liberal arts to explore the larger question of how the Bible became the focus of medieval culture in the West. Augustine himself became increasingly aware that an ambivalent attitude towards knowledge and learning was inherent in Christianity. By facing the intellectual challenge posed by this tension he arrived at a new theory of how to interpret the Bible correctly. The topics investigated here include: Augustine's changing relationship with the 'disciplines', as he moved from an attempt at their Christianization to a radical reshaping of them within a Christian world-view ; the factors that prompted and facilitated his change of perspective; and the ways in which Augustine's evolving theory reflected contemporary trends in Christian pedagogy.

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Saint Augustine.Michael Mendelson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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