Types of degrees and types of event structures

In Event Arguments: Foundations and Applications. Mouton de Gruyter. pp. 277-300 (2005)
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Abstract

In this paper, we investigate how certain types of predicates should be connected with certain types of degree scales, and how this can affect the events they describe. The distribution and interpretation of various degree adverbials will serve us as a guideline in this perspective. They suggest that two main types of degree scales should be distinguished: (i) quantity scales, which are characterized by the semantic equivalence of Yannig ate the cake partially and Yannig ate part of the cake; quantity scales only appear with verbs possessing an incremental theme (cf. Dowty 1991); (ii) intensity scales, which are characterized by degree modifiers (e.g., extremely, perfectly) receiving an intensive interpretation; intensity scales typically occur with verbs morphologically related to an adjective (to dry). More generally, we capitalize on a typology of degree structures to explain how degrees play a central role with respect to event structure.

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David Nicolas
École Normale Supérieure

Citations of this work

On the Semantics of Comparison Across Categories.Alexis Wellwood - 2015 - Linguistics and Philosophy 38 (1):67-101.
Comparison Across Domains in Delineation Semantics.Heather Burnett - 2015 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 24 (3):233-265.

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References found in this work

Parts : a Study in Ontology.Peter Simons - 1987 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2:277-279.
Verbs and Times.Zeno Vendler - 1957 - Philosophical Review 66 (2):143-160.
Word Meaning and Montague Grammar.David R. Dowty - 1982 - Philosophical Review 91 (2):290-295.
Parts: A Study in Ontology.Peter Simons - 1988 - Mind 97 (388):638-640.

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