Authors
Casey Helgeson
Pennsylvania State University
Abstract
ABSTRACT ‘Modus Darwin’ is the name given by Elliott Sober to a form of argument that he attributes to Darwin in the Origin of Species, and to subsequent evolutionary biologists who have reasoned in the same way. In short, the argument form goes: similarity, ergo common ancestry. In this article, I review and critique Sober’s analysis of Darwin’s reasoning. I argue that modus Darwin has serious limitations that make the argument form unsuitable for supporting Darwin’s conclusions, and that Darwin did not reason in this way.
Keywords common ancestry  evidence
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2016, 2018
DOI 10.1093/bjps/axw015
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

References found in this work BETA

On the Origin of Species.Charles Darwin - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
Logic of Statistical Inference.Ian Hacking - 1965 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

View all 16 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Pattern as Observation: Darwin’s ‘Great Facts’ of Geographical Distribution.Casey Helgeson - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 7 (2):337-351.
Similarities as Evidence for Common Ancestry: A Likelihood Epistemology.Elliott Sober & Mike Steel - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (3):617-638.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Modus Darwin.Elliott Sober - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (2):253-278.
Backwards in Retrospect.Tim Lewens - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (3):813-821.
Pattern as Observation: Darwin’s ‘Great Facts’ of Geographical Distribution.Casey Helgeson - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 7 (2):337-351.
Darwin, Herschel, and the Role of Analogy in Darwin's Origin.Peter Gildenhuys - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (4):593-611.
Darwin, Herschel, and the Role of Analogy in Darwin’s Origin.Peter Gildenhuys - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (4):593-611.
Darwin’s Place in the History of Thought: A Reevaluation.Robert J. Richards - 2009 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106 (Supplement 1):10056-10060.
Darwin Was a Teleologist.James G. Lennox - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):409-421.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2015-02-28

Total views
527 ( #16,327 of 2,499,864 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
7 ( #102,064 of 2,499,864 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes