Kant's ethics of war and peace

Journal of Military Ethics 3 (2):161-177 (2004)
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Abstract

This essay explores Kant's writings on war and peace, and concentrates on the thesis that Kant has a just war theory. It strives to explain what the substance of that theory is, and finds that it differs in several respects from that offered by the just war tradition. Many scholars suspect that Kant has no just war theory. Effort is made to overturn this conventional understanding: first by showing, negatively, that Kant does not subscribe to the two main rival doctrines on the issue, namely, realism and pacifism; and second by demonstrating, positively, how the core propositions of just war theory are consistent with Kant's basic moral and political principles. Interpretive reconstruction then reveals the full substance of Kant's just war theory, which is divided into accounts of jus ad bellum, jus in bello and jus post bellum. Kant's jus post bellum reflections remain his most deep, original and relevant in this regard

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Brian Orend
University of Waterloo

Citations of this work

What's So Bad About Lying?Sophie Macdonald - 2023 - University of British Columbia Journal of Philosophical Enquiries 1 (4):35-46.
Military Ethics Education and the Changing Nature of Warfare.Bojana Višekruna & Dragan Stanar - 2021 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 63 (11):145-157.

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References found in this work

Kant: political writings.Immanuel Kant - 1991 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Hans Siegbert Reiss.
Kant, liberal legacies, and foreign affairs.Michael W. Doyle - 1983 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (3):205-235.

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