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Jeff McMahan [105]Jefferson Mcmahan [5]
  1. The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life.Jeff McMahan - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of killing, where the moral status of the individual is uncertain or controversial. Drawing on philosophical notions of personal identity and the wrongness of killing, McMahan looks carefully at a host of practical issues including abortion, infanticide, the killing of animals, assisted suicide and euthanasia.
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  2.  90
    Killing in War.Jeff McMahan - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Jeff McMahan urges us to reject the view, dominant throughout history, that mere participation in an unjust war is not wrong.
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  3. The Ethics of Killing in War.Jeff McMahan - 2004 - Ethics 114 (4):693-733.
    The traditional theory of the just war comprises two sets of principles, one governing the resort to war ( jus ad bellum) and the other governing the conduct of war ( jus in bello). The two sets of principles are regarded, in Michael Walzer’s words, as “logically independent. It is perfectly possible for a just war to be fought unjustly and for an unjust war to be fought in strict accordance with the rules.”1 Let us say that those who fight (...)
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  4. The Basis of Moral Liability to Defensive Killing.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):386–405.
    There may be circumstances in which it is morally justifiable intentionally to kill a person who is morally innocent, threatens no one, rationally wishes not to die, and does not consent to be killed. Although the killing would wrong the victim, it might be justified by the necessity of averting some disaster that would otherwise occur. In other instances of permissible killing, however, the justification appeals to more than consequences. It may appeal to the claim that the person to be (...)
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  5.  54
    The Ethics of Killing.Jeff Mcmahan - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (2):477-490.
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  6. The Ethics of Killing in War.Jeff McMahan - 2006 - Philosophia 34 (1):693-733.
    This paper argues that certain central tenets of the traditional theory of the just war cannot be correct. It then advances an alternative account grounded in the same considerations of justice that govern self-defense at the individual level. The implications of this account are unorthodox. It implies that, with few exceptions, combatants who fight for an unjust cause act impermissibly when they attack enemy combatants, and that combatants who fight in a just war may, in certain circumstances, legitimately target noncombatants (...)
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  7. Causing People to Exist and Saving People’s Lives.Jeff McMahan - 2013 - The Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):5-35.
    Most people are skeptical of the claim that the expectation that a person would have a life that would be well worth living provides a reason to cause that person to exist. In this essay I argue that to cause such a person to exist would be to confer a benefit of a noncomparative kind and that there is a moral reason to bestow benefits of this kind. But this conclusion raises many problems, among which is that it must be (...)
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  8. Philosophical Critiques of Effective Altruism.Jeff McMahan - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 73:92-99.
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  9. Asymmetries in the Morality of Causing People to Exist.Jeff McMahan - 2009 - In David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer. pp. 49--68.
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  10. Cognitive Disability, Misfortune, and Justice.Jeff Mcmahan - 1996 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (1):3-35.
  11. Self-Defense and the Problem of the Innocent Attacker.Jeff McMahan - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):252-290.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
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  12. Animalism and the Varieties of Conjoined Twinning.Tim Campbell & Jeff McMahan - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (4):285-301.
    We defend the view that we are not identical to organisms against the objection that it implies that there are two subjects of every conscious state one experiences: oneself and one’s organism. We then criticize animalism —the view that each of us is identical to a human organism—by showing that it has unacceptable implications for a range of actual and hypothetical cases of conjoined twinning : dicephalus, craniopagus parasiticus, and cephalopagus.
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  13. Death and the Value of Life.Jeff McMahan - 1988 - Ethics 99 (1):32-61.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
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  14. Challenges To Human Equality.Jeff McMahan - 2007 - The Journal of Ethics 12 (1):81-104.
    According to liberal egalitarian morality, all human beings are one another's moral equals. Nonhuman animals, by contrast, are not considered to be our moral equals. This essay considers two challenges to the liberal egalitarian view. One is the ``separation problem,'' which is the challenge to identify a morally significant intrinsic difference between all human beings and all nonhuman animals. The other is the “equality problem,” which is to explain how all human beings can be morally equal when there are some (...)
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  15. “Our Fellow Creatures”.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - The Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):353 - 380.
    This paper defends “moral individualism” against various arguments that have been intended to show that membership in the human species or participation in our distinctively human form of life is a sufficient basis for a moral status higher than that of any animal. Among the arguments criticized are the “nature-of-the-kind argument,” which claims that it is the nature of all human beings to have certain higher psychological capacities, even if, contingently, some human beings lack them, and various versions of the (...)
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  16. Killing, Letting Die, and Withdrawing Aid.Jeff McMahan - 1993 - Ethics 103 (2):250-279.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
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  17. Just Cause for War.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):1-21.
    A just cause for war is a type of wrong that may make those responsible for it morally liable to military attack as a means of preventing or rectifying it. This claim has implications that conflict with assumptions of the current theory of just war.
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  18. Moral Intuition.Jeff McMahan - 2000 - In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell. pp. 92--110.
     
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  19.  83
    Problems of Population Theory:Obligations to Future Generations. R. I. Sikora, Brian Barry.Jefferson McMahan - 1981 - Ethics 92 (1):96-.
  20. Intention, Permissibility, Terrorism, and War.Jeff McMahan - 2009 - Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):345-372.
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  21. Causing Disabled People to Exist and Causing People to Be Disabled.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - Ethics 116 (1):77-99.
    Attempts to determine or to select what kind of person or people to bring into existence are controversial. This is particularly true of “negative selection” or “selecting against” a certain type of person—that is, the attempt to prevent a person of a certain type, or people of that type, from existing. Virtually everyone agrees that some instances of negative selection are objectionable—for example, that selection against healthy people would be wrong, particularly if this were combined with positive selection of people (...)
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  22. On the Moral Equality of Combatants.Jeff McMahan - 2006 - Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (4):377–393.
    THERE’S a well-known scene in Shakespeare’s Henry V in which the King, disguised as an ordinary soldier, is conversing with some of his soldiers on the eve of the battle of Agincourt. Hoping to find or inspire support among them, he remarks: “Methinks I could not die anywhere so contented as in the King’s company, his cause being just and his quarrel honorable.” One soldier replies: “That’s more than we know,” whereupon a second says: “Ay, or more than we should (...)
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  23. Innocence, Self-Defense and Killing in War.Jeff McMahan - 1994 - Journal of Political Philosophy 2 (3):193–221.
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  24. An Alternative to Brain Death.Jeff McMahan - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):44-48.
    Most contributors to the debate about brain death, including Dr. James Bernat, share certain assumptions. They believe that the concept of death is univocal, that death is a biological phenomenon, that it is necessarily irreversible, that it is paradigmatically something that happens to organisms, that we are human organisms, and therefore that our deaths will be deaths of organisms. These claims are supposed to have moral significance. It is, for example, only when a person dies that it is permissible to (...)
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  25.  78
    War as Self-Defense.Jeff McMahan - 2004 - Ethics and International Affairs 18 (1):75-80.
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  26. The Just Distribution of Harm Between Combatants and Noncombatants.Jeff Mcmahan - 2010 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (4):342-379.
  27. The Metaphysics of Brain Death.Jeff Mcmahan - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (2):91–126.
    The dominant conception of brain death as the death of the whole brain constitutes an unstable compromise between the view that a person ceases to exist when she irreversibly loses the capacity for consciousness and the view that a human organism dies only when it ceases to function in an integrated way. I argue that no single criterion of death captures the importance we attribute both to the loss of the capacity for consciousness and to the loss of functioning of (...)
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  28. Infanticide.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (2):131-159.
    It is sometimes suggested that if a moral theory implies that infanticide can sometimes be permissible, that is sufficient to discredit the theory. I argue in this article that the common-sense belief that infanticide is wrong, and perhaps even worse than the killing of an adult, is challenged not so much by theoretical considerations as by common-sense beliefs about abortion, the killing of non-human animals, and so on. Because there are no intrinsic differences between premature infants and viable fetuses, it (...)
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  29.  54
    The Morality of War and the Law of War.Jeff McMahan - 2008 - In David Rodin & Henry Shue (eds.), Just and Unjust Warriors: The Moral and Legal Status of Soldiers. Oxford University Press. pp. 19--43.
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  30. Revising the Doctrine of Double Effect.Jeff McMahan - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):201-212.
    The Doctrine of Double Effect has been challenged by the claim that what an agent intends as a means may be limited to those effects that are precisely characterized by the descriptions under which the agent believes that they are minimally causally necessary for the production of other effects that the agent seeks to bring about. If based on so narrow a conception of an intended means, the traditional Doctrine of Double Effect becomes limitlessly permissive. In this paper I examine (...)
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  31. Cognitive Disability and Cognitive Enhancement.Jeff Mcmahan - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):582-605.
  32.  24
    Innocence, Self‐Defense and Killing in War.Jeff McMahan - 1994 - Journal of Political Philosophy 2 (3):193-221.
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  33.  17
    The Ethics of Killing in War.Jeff McMahan - 2006 - Philosophia 34 (1):23-41.
    This paper argues that certain central tenets of the traditional theory of the just war cannot be correct. It then advances an alternative account grounded in the same considerations of justice that govern self-defense at the individual level. The implications of this account are unorthodox. It implies that, with few exceptions, combatants who fight for an unjust cause act impermissibly when they attack enemy combatants, and that combatants who fight in a just war may, in certain circumstances, legitimately target noncombatants (...)
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  34. Killing Embryos for Stem Cell Research.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):170–189.
    The main objection to human embryonic stem cell research is that it involves killing human embryos, which are essentially beings of the same sort that you and I are. This objection presupposes that we once existed as early embryos and that we had the same moral status then that we have now. This essay challenges both those presuppositions, but focuses primarily on the first. I argue first that these presuppositions are incompatible with widely accepted beliefs about both assisted conception and (...)
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  35.  83
    The Just War and the Gulf War.Jeff Mcmahan & Robert Mckim - 1993 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):501 - 541.
    Discussions of the morality of the Gulf War have tended to embrace the traditional theory of the just war uncritically and to apply its tenets in a mechanical and unimaginative fashion. We believe, by contrast, that careful reflection of the Gulf War reveals that certain principles of the traditional theory are oversimplifications that require considerable refinement. Our aims, therefore, are both practical and theoretical. We hope to contribute to a better understanding of the ethics both of war in general and (...)
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  36. Wrongful Life: Paradoxes in the Morality of Causing People to Exist.Jeff McMahan - 1998 - In Jules L. Coleman, Christopher W. Morris & Gregory S. Kavka (eds.), Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Cambridge University Press. pp. 208--47.
  37.  58
    Proportionality and Time.Jeff McMahan - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):696-719.
    Proportionality in the resort to war determines a limit to the amount of harm it can be permissible to cause for the sake of achieving a just cause. It seems to follow that if a war has caused harm up to that limit but has not achieved the just cause, it should be terminated. I argue, however, that this is a mistake. Judgments of proportionality are entirely prospective and harms suffered or inflicted in the past should in general be ignored. (...)
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  38.  89
    Paradoxes of Abortion and Prenatal Injury.Jeff McMahan - 2006 - Ethics 116 (4):625-655.
    Many people who believe that abortion may often be justified by appeal to the pregnant woman’s interests also believe that a woman’s infliction of significant but nonlethal injury on her fetus can seldom be justified by appeal to her interests. Yet the second of these beliefs can seem to cast doubt on the first. For the view that the infliction of prenatal injury is seriously morally objectionable may seem to presuppose a view about the status of the fetus that challenges (...)
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  39. Pacifism and Moral Theory.Jeff McMahan - 2010 - Diametros 23:44-68.
    There is a nonabsolute or “contingent” form of pacifism that claims that war in contemporary conditions inevitably involves the killing of innocent people on a scale that is too great to be justified. Some contingent pacifists argue that war always involves a risk that virtually everyone that one might kill is innocent – either because one can never be sure that one’s cause is just or because even most of those who fight in wars that lack a just cause are (...)
     
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  40. Duty, Obedience, Desert, and Proportionality in War: A Response.Jeff McMahan - 2011 - Ethics 122 (1):135-167.
  41.  78
    On ‘Modal Personism’.Jeff McMahan - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (1):26-30.
    In this article I present several challenges to the view that Shelly Kagan calls ‘modal personism’. First, there is a plausible account of our identity that, if true, greatly diminishes the scope of Kagan's view. But the scope of the view is already quite limited because the category of modal persons is restricted to those non-persons that had but have lost the potential to become persons. If the category were to include non-persons that retain the potential to become persons, Kagan's (...)
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  42.  40
    Climate Change, War, and the Non-Identity Problem.Jeff McMahan - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-28.
    This paper explores the relevance of the Non-Identity Problem to explaining the wrongness of causing climate change.
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  43. Humanitarian Intervention, Consent, and Proportionality.Jeff McMahan - 2009 - In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.
    However much one may wish for nonviolent solutions to the problems of unjust and unrestrained human violence that Glover explores in Humanity, some of those problems at present require violent responses. One cannot read his account of the Clinton administration’s campaign to sabotage efforts to stop the massacre in Rwanda in 1994 – a campaign motivated by fear that American involvement would cost American lives and therefore votes – without concluding that Glover himself believes that military intervention was morally required (...)
     
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  44.  73
    Self-Defense and Culpability.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - Law and Philosophy 24 (6):751-774.
    Moral agents sometimes have to act on the basis of beliefs that are reasonable in the context but are in fact false. In these circumstances, agents often act in ways that would be right if their beliefs were true but that they would recognize as wrong if they could see that their beliefs were false. Sometimes our tendency is to think that what these agents do is justified – for example, in the case discussed by Ferzan in which one person, (...)
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  45.  56
    Debate: Justification and Liability in War &Ast.Jeff McMahan - 2008 - Journal of Political Philosophy 16 (2):227-244.
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  46.  20
    Proportionality and Just Cause.Jeff McMahan - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):428-453.
  47. Torture in Principle and in Practice.Jeff McMahan - 2008 - Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (2):91-108.
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  48. 10. Notes on Contributors Notes on Contributors (P. 460).David Estlund, Kok‐Chor Tan, Sophia Reibetanz, Susan J. Brison, Arthur Isak Applbaum, Tamara Horowitz, Elinor Mason & Jeff McMahan - 1998 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  49. The Lucretian Argument.Jeff McMahan - unknown
    Lucretius wrote: “Look back at the eternity that passed before we were born, and mark how utterly it counts to us as nothing. This is a mirror that Nature holds up to us, in which we may see the time that shall be after we are dead. Is there anything terrifying in the sight – anything depressing – anything that is not more restful than the soundest sleep?”1 The argument is repeated, a couple of millennia later, by Vladimir Nabokov, who (...)
     
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  50. Nuclear Deterrence, Morality and Realism.John Finnis, Joseph M. Boyle, Germain Grisez & Jefferson Mcmahan - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (1):93-106.
     
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