Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Social Accountability, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Protests.Dean Neu, Gregory D. Saxton & Abu S. Rahaman - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (1):17-31.
    This study examines the 3.5 m+ English-language original tweets that occurred during the 2011 Occupy Wall Street protests. Starting from previous research, we analyze how character terms such as “the banker,” “politician,” “the teaparty,” “GOP,” and “the corporation,” as well as concept terms such as “ethics,” “fairness,” “morals,” “justice,” and “democracy” were used by individual participants to respond to the Occupy Wall Street events. These character and concept terms not only allowed individuals to take an ethical stance but also accumulated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Speaking Truth to Power: Twitter Reactions to the Panama Papers.Dean Neu, Gregory Saxton, Jeffery Everett & Abu Rahaman Shiraz - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):473-485.
    The current study examines the micro-linguistic details of Twitter responses to the whistleblower-initiated publication of the Panama Papers. The leaked documents contained the micro-details of tax avoidance, tax evasion, and wealth accumulation schemes used by business elites, politicians, and government bureaucrats. The public release of the documents on April 4, 2016 resulted in a groundswell of Twitter and other social media activity throughout the world, including 161,036 Spanish-language tweets in the subsequent 5-month period. The findings illustrate that the responses were (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Effect of Online Protests and Firm Responses on Shareholder and Consumer Evaluation.Tijs van den Broek, David Langley & Tobias Hornig - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):279-294.
    Protests that target firms’ socially irresponsible behavior are increasingly organized via digital media. This study uses two methods to investigate the effects that online protests and mitigating firm responses have on shareholders’ and consumers’ evaluation. The first method is a financial analysis that includes an event study which measures the effect of online protests on the target firm’s share price, as well as an investigation of the boundary effects of protest characteristics. The second method is an online experiment that assesses (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Diversity as Polyphony: Reconceptualizing Diversity Management From a Communication-Centered Perspective.Hannah Trittin & Dennis Schoeneborn - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):305-322.
    In this paper, we propose reconceptualizing diversity management from a communication-centered perspective. We base our proposal on the observation that the literature on diversity management, both in the instrumental and critical traditions, is primarily concerned with fostering the diversity of organizational members in terms of individual-bound criteria. By drawing on Bakhtin’s notion of polyphony as well as the ‘communicative constitution of organizations’ perspective, we suggest reconsidering diversity as the plurality of ‘voices’ which can be understood as the range of individual (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • CSR Politics of Non‐Recognition: Justification Fallacies Marginalising Criticism, Society, and Environment.Peter Norberg - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (4):694-705.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Legitimacy and Cosmopolitanism: Online Public Debates on (Corporate) Responsibility.Anne Vestergaard & Julie Uldam - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):227-240.
    Social media platforms have been vested with hope for their potential to enable ‘ordinary citizens’ to make their judgments public and contribute to pluralized discussions about organizations and their perceived legitimacy :60–97, 2018). This raises questions about how ordinary citizens make judgements and voice them in online spaces. This paper addresses these questions by examining how Western citizens ascribe responsibility and action in relation to corporate misconduct. Empirically, it focuses on modern slavery and analyses online debates in Denmark on child (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Corporate Reputation and Collective Crises: A Theoretical Development Using the Case of Rana Plaza.Breeda Comyns & Elizabeth Franklin-Johnson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):159-183.
    Banking scandals, accounting fraud, product recalls, and environmental disasters, their associated reputational effects as well as company response strategies have been well reported in the literature. Reported crises and scandals typically involve one focal company for example BP and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon accident. As business practices change and company supply chains become more complex and interlinked, there is a greater risk of collective crises where multiple companies are associated with the same scandal. We argue that companies are likely to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Exploring Corporations’ Dialogue About CSR in the Digital Era.Laura Illia, Stefania Romenti, Belén Rodríguez-Cánovas, Grazia Murtarelli & Craig E. Carroll - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):39-58.
    In this paper, we examined how companies are employing new media to engage in dialogue with their stakeholders about corporate social responsibility -related matters. Through a qualitative theory-building study conducted in three stages over a period of 2 years, we discovered that corporations with reputations for CSR have built virtual spaces for dialogue about CSR, but that these spaces remain empty of dialogue. Our theory-building model highlights how the mix of four dialogue processes may allow companies to create open dialogue (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • CSR and the Mediated Emergence of Strategic Ambiguity.Eric Guthey & Mette Morsing - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):555-569.
    We develop a framework for understanding how lack of clarity in business press coverage of corporate social responsibility functions as a mediated and emergent form of strategic ambiguity. Many stakeholders expect CSR to exhibit clarity, consistency, and discursive closure. But stakeholders also expect CSR to conform to varying degrees of both formal and substantive rationality. These diverse expectations conflict with each other and change over time. A content analysis of press coverage in Denmark suggests that the business media reflect and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • License to Critique: A Communication Perspective on Sustainability Standards.Lars Thøger Christensen, Mette Morsing & Ole Thyssen - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (2):239-262.
    ABSTRACT:Sustainability standards are important governance tools for addressing social and environmental challenges. Yet, such tools are often criticized for being either too open-ended or too restrictive, thereby failing to contribute significantly to the development of sustainable practices. Both dimensions of the critique, however, miss the point. While all standards in principle combine elements of openness and closure, both of which are necessary to keep the sustainability agenda relevant and adaptive, sustainability standards often operate in contexts that favor closure. In this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Social Media Policies: Implications for Contemporary Notions of Corporate Social Responsibility.Cynthia Stohl, Michael Etter, Scott Banghart & DaJung Woo - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3):413-436.
    Three global developments situate the context of this investigation: the increasing use of social media by organizations and their employees, the burgeoning presence of social media policies, and the heightened focus on corporate social responsibility. In this study the intersection of these trends is examined through a content analysis of 112 publicly available social media policies from the largest corporations in the world. The extent to which social media policies facilitate and/or constrain the communicative sensibilities and values associated with contemporary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Employee Anonymous Online Dissent: Dynamics and Ethical Challenges for Employees, Targeted Organisations, Online Outlets, and Audiences.Silvia Ravazzani & Alessandra Mazzei - 2018 - Business Ethics Quarterly 28 (2):175-201.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation