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  1.  86
    In AI We Trust? Perceptions About Automated Decision-Making by Artificial Intelligence.Theo Araujo, Natali Helberger, Sanne Kruikemeier & Claes H. de Vreese - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (3):611-623.
    Fueled by ever-growing amounts of data and advances in artificial intelligence, decision-making in contemporary societies is increasingly delegated to automated processes. Drawing from social science theories and from the emerging body of research about algorithmic appreciation and algorithmic perceptions, the current study explores the extent to which personal characteristics can be linked to perceptions of automated decision-making by AI, and the boundary conditions of these perceptions, namely the extent to which such perceptions differ across media, health, and judicial contexts. Data (...)
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  2.  3
    The Impact of Sharing Brand Messages: How Message, Sender and Receiver Characteristics Influence Brand Attitudes and Information Diffusion on Social Networking Sites.Theo Araujo - 2019 - Communications 44 (2):162-184.
    Social Networking Sites not only enable users to read or create content about brands, but also to easily pass along this content using information diffusion mechanisms such as retweeting or sharing. While these capabilities can be optimal for viral marketing, little is known, however, about how reading brand messages passed along by SNS contacts influences online brand communication outcomes. Results of a survey with active SNS users indicate that message evaluation, the relationship with the sender, and the receiver’s opinion leadership (...)
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  3. Cultural Differences in Motivation for Consumers’ Online Brand-Related Activities on Facebook.Peter Neijens, Theo Araujo & Gauze Pitipon Kitirattarkarn - 2020 - Communications 45 (1):53-73.
    Given the increased relevance of social networking sites for consumers around the globe, companies face the challenge of understanding motivations underlying consumers’ interactions with online brand-related content. Cross-cultural research on consumer motivations for online brand-related activities on SNSs, however, is limited. The present study explored, via in-depth interviews, reasons why Facebook users from individualistic and collectivistic cultures engage with brand-related content. The findings provide in-depth insights, in particular, with regards to collectivistic consumers, to the varied interpretations of the motivations for (...)
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