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  1.  32
    Anti-Racist Moral Education: A Review of Approaches, Impact and Theoretical Underpinnings From 2000 to 2015. [REVIEW]Ingrid Lynch, Sharlene Swartz & Dane Isaacs - 2017 - Journal of Moral Education 46 (2):129-144.
    Racism is a moral issue and of concern for moral educators, with recent social movements such as #BlackLivesMatter highlighting how far we are from obliterating racial oppression and the unearned privilege whiteness confers. To contribute to a more formalised approach to anti-racist moral education, this article systematically reviews 15 years of peer-reviewed scholarship concerned with anti-racist education, to establish the definitions and aims of anti-racist education drawn on, the theoretical frameworks underpinning these, the methods used in education efforts, and their (...)
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  2.  7
    Research as Freedom: Using a Continuum of Interactive, Participatory and Emancipatory Methods for Addressing Youth Marginality.Sharlene Swartz & Anye Nyamnjoh - 2018 - HTS Theological Studies 74 (3).
    This article offers an analysis of a continuum along which interactive, participatory and emancipatory inquiries may be placed in critical qualitative research with a social justice focus. It draws on critical distinctions to make the argument that labelling research ‘participatory’ hides both interactive approaches and those that might be seen to be emancipatory in the vein of Paolo Freire and Stanley Biggs. To support the argument for a continuum of engaged research, four recent research studies from South Africa, Cameroon, Nigeria (...)
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  3.  11
    Unpacking (White) Privilege in a South African University Classroom: A Neglected Element in Multicultural Educational Contexts.Sharlene Swartz, Emma Arogundade & Danya Davis - 2014 - Journal of Moral Education 43 (3):345-361.
    Multiculturalism currently aims for the political accommodation of difference instead of the subversion of the resulting privileges of difference. In the South African context such a distinction is especially important since the economic and symbolic subjugation of the majority of Black South Africans continues despite political transformation, and is exacerbated by an unwillingness to reflect on privilege and inequality. Drawing on Biko and Soudien’s critique of multiculturalism and vision for anti-racist education, this paper describes a classroom activity set for 164 (...)
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  4.  39
    A Long Walk to Citizenship: Morality, Justice and Faith in the Aftermath of Apartheid.Sharlene Swartz - 2006 - Journal of Moral Education 35 (4):551-570.
    Numerous initiatives, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Race and Values in Education process of the Department of Education, the government-initiated Moral Regeneration Movement and the pervasive indigenous African philosophy of ubuntu have, over the past twelve years since South Africa's transition to democracy, contributed materially to reforming and renewing the concepts of citizenship and morality in South Africa. Central to this debate have been issues of socio-economic justice for the vast majority of her historically disadvantaged citizens; a (...)
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  5.  8
    The Pain and the Promise of Moral Education in Sub‐Saharan Africa.Sharlene Swartz - 2010 - Journal of Moral Education 39 (3):267-272.
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  6.  23
    ‘Moral Ecology’ and ‘Moral Capital’: Tools Towards a Sociology of Moral Education From a South African Ethnography.Sharlene Swartz - 2010 - Journal of Moral Education 39 (3):267-272.
  7.  43
    ‘Moral Ecology’ and ‘Moral Capital’: Tools Towards a Sociology of Moral Education From a South African Ethnography.Sharlene Swartz - 2010 - Journal of Moral Education 39 (3):305-327.
    Research and pedagogy in the field of morality and moral education has long been dominated by philosophical and psychological disciplines. Although sociological studies and theorising in the field have not been absent, it has been limited and non?systematic. Drawing on a study that investigated the lived morality of a group of young South Africans growing up in the aftermath of Apartheid and in the townships of Cape Town, this paper surveys the historical contribution made by sociologists to the study of (...)
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  8.  15
    Gender Respect: Empirical Insights for (Moral) Educators About Women’s Struggles for Respect in the Global South.Madeleine Arnot & Sharlene Swartz - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (4):1-17.
    Promoting gender respect is essential to the development of both sexes and to gender equality. This article argues for the importance of moral education to support the struggle of girls and women to achieve respect within unequal and complex gender power relations, especially in poverty contexts. Evidence collected from a sequence of in-depth qualitative studies in the Global South highlights the diverse ways that the giving of respect and the struggle to be respected shapes women’s lives. We show that moral (...)
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  9.  8
    Being Turned Inside Out: Researching Youth, Morality and Restitution From the Global South.Sharlene Swartz - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):407-415.
    This article maps my journey as a scholar engaged in the research of youth morality (located in the Global South); as a beneficiary of injustice having grown up as a white South African; as a navigator of complex personal histories (discovering my mixed race family origins); and arriving at restitution as a career research focus. It reflects on the experience of being turned inside out through examining personal and political locatedness in moral research and how these change as new discoveries (...)
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  10.  1
    Cultivating Moral Eyes: Bridging the Knowledge-Action Gap of Privilege and Injustice Among Students in African Universities.Sharlene Swartz, Anye Nyamnjoh, Emma Arogundade, Jessica Breakey, Abioseh Bockarie & Oghoadena C. Osezua - 2022 - Journal of Moral Education 51 (2):186-203.
    ABSTRACT When opposing injustice, the failure to recognise wrong or translate knowledge into action are two problems with which moral education has to contend. The notion of ‘social restitution’ can be a helpful concept in addressing these challenges because it locates restitution at the level of interpersonal and communal moral responsibility. This is important because restitution is often seen almost exclusively as a government or institutional endeavour. This paper describes a study conducted amongst 72 students from four African universities in (...)
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  11.  3
    Cultivating Moral Eyes: Bridging the Knowledge-Action Gap of Privilege and Injustice Among Students in African Universities.Sharlene Swartz, Anye Nyamnjoh, Emma Arogundade, Jessica Breakey, Abioseh Bockarie & Oghoadena C. Osezua - 2020 - Journal of Moral Education:1-18.
  12.  1
    Towards Emancipatory Research Methodologies with Children in the African Context: Practical Possibilities and Overcoming Challenges.Kholofelo C. Motha, Matthews M. Makgamatha & Sharlene Swartz - 2019 - Hts Theological Studies 75 (1).
    Despite having international and national legislative frameworks and policies that guarantee children’s rights and encourage their participation in matters affecting them, consulting children has received scant scholarly attention in the African context. Notwithstanding this state of affairs, it is important to ask whether, in keeping with growing progressive practices, having children as active researchers is a feasible goal to achieve and, if so, how might this be possible. Drawing on Swartz and Nyamnjoh’s framework of research existing along an emancipatory continuum, (...)
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