Could There Be More Than One God?

Faith and Philosophy 5 (3):225 - 241 (1988)
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Abstract

THERE COULD BE MORE THAN ONE GOD (DEFINED BY THE NORMAL DIVINE PREDICATES), ONLY IF A FIRST GOD BRINGS ABOUT (FROM ETERNITY) A SECOND GOD, AND THE FIRST TWO BRING ABOUT A THIRD GOD. IN ORDER TO EVINCE THE GOODNESS OF SHARING AND COOPERATING IN SHARING, THEY WILL DO THIS NECESSARILY. BUT THEY DO NOT HAVE TO PRODUCE A FOURTH GOD; AND SINCE A GOD MUST EXIST NECESSARILY IF AT ALL, THERE WILL BE AND CAN BE ONLY THREE GODS. BUT SINCE THEY MUTUALLY SUSTAIN EACH OTHER, THEY FORM A TRINITY

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Citations of this work

Trinity.Dale Tuggy - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Split Brains and the Godhead.Trenton Merricks - 2006 - In Thomas Crisp, David Vander Laan & Matthew Davidson (eds.), Knowledge and Reality: Essays in Honor of Alvin Plantinga. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 299-326.
Objections to Social Trinitarianism.William Hasker - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (4):421 - 439.
Trinity and Polytheism.Edward Wierenga - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):281-294.
The Logical Problem of the Trinity.Beau Branson - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Notre Dame

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References found in this work

The problem of total devotion.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1993 - In Neera Kapur Badhwar (ed.), Friendship: A Philosophical Reader. Cornell University Press. pp. 108--132.

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