Moral disengagement and tolerance for health care inequality in Texas

Mind and Society 9 (1):25-29 (2010)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Societies vary in their levels of social inequality and in the degree of popular support for policies that reduce disparities within them. Survey research in Texas, where levels of disparity in health and medical care are relatively high, studied how psychological mechanisms of moral disengagement relate to public support for expanding access to government-subsidized health care. Telephone interviews ( N = 1,063) measured agreement with statements expressing tendencies to minimize the effects of inequality, blame its victims and morally justify limits on government help. The interviews also assessed support for general and specific policies to reduce inequality, e.g., through state-subsidized health care for lower income groups, as well as political party affiliation, ideological orientation, gender, age, education and income. Agreement with beliefs expressing moral disengagement was associated with opposition to governmental policies to reduce inequality in children’s health care. Beliefs that justify the withholding of government assistance, blame the victims of societal inequality, and minimize perceptions of their suffering were strongly related to variation between and within groups in support for governmental action to reduce inequality

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,227

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Broadening the bioethics agenda.Dan W. Brock - 2000 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):21-38.
Is inequality bad for our health?Jeffrey D. Milyo & Jennifer M. Mellor - 1999 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 13 (3-4):359-372.
Healthy respect: ethics in health care.R. S. Downie - 1994 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Kenneth C. Calman & Ruth A. K. Schröck.
Health care for children: A community perspective.Daniel Callahan - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (2):137 – 146.
Responsibility for Health and Blaming Victims.Mike W. Martin - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (2):95-114.

Analytics

Added to PP
2010-09-14

Downloads
40 (#400,176)

6 months
11 (#243,798)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references