Princeton University Press (2005)

Authors
Michael Ignatieff
Harvard University (PhD)
Abstract
With the 2003 invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq, the most controversial question in world politics fast became whether the United States stands within the order of international law or outside it. Does America still play by the rules it helped create? American Exceptionalism and Human Rights addresses this question as it applies to U.S. behavior in relation to international human rights. With essays by eleven leading experts in such fields as international relations and international law, it seeks to show and explain how America's approach to human rights differs from that of most other Western nations. In his introduction, Michael Ignatieff identifies three main types of exceptionalism: exemptionalism ; double standards ; and legal isolationism. The contributors use Ignatieff's essay as a jumping-off point to discuss specific types of exceptionalism--America's approach to capital punishment and to free speech, for example--or to explore the social, cultural, and institutional roots of exceptionalism.These essays--most of which appear in print here for the first time, and all of which have been revised or updated since being presented in a year-long lecture series on American exceptionalism at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government--are by Stanley Hoffmann, Paul Kahn, Harold Koh, Frank Michelman, Andrew Moravcsik, John Ruggie, Frederick Schauer, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Carol Steiker, and Cass Sunstein
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy this book $44.65 new   Amazon page
ISBN(s) 9780691116488   0691116474   0691116482
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 71,489
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Discursive Illusions in Legislative Discourse: A Socio-Pragmatic Study. [REVIEW]Aditi Bhatia & Vijay K. Bhatia - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (1):1-19.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Human Rights, Legitimacy, and International Law.John Tasioulas - 2013 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 58 (1):1-25.
Property Rights in Genetic Information.Richard A. Spinello - 2004 - Ethics and Information Technology 6 (1):29-42.
Toward a Political Conception of Human Rights.Kenneth Baynes - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (4):371-390.
Human Rights and Human Well-Being.William Talbott - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
History, Human Rights, and Globalization.Sumner B. Twiss - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):39-70.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2014-03-09

Total views
1 ( #1,553,273 of 2,520,805 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #405,623 of 2,520,805 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

Sorry, there are not enough data points to plot this chart.

My notes