Plato’s Dionysian Music?

Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):17-47 (2007)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Like Aristophanes’ Frogs, Plato’s Symposium stages a contest between literary genres. The quarrel between Socrates and Aristophanes constitutes the primary axis of this contest, and the speech of Alcibiades echoes and extends that of Aristophanes. Alcibiades’ comparison of Socrates with a satyr, however, contains the key to understanding Socrates’ implication, at the very end of the dialogue, that philosophy alone understands the inner connectedness, and hence the proper nature, of both tragedy and comedy. I argue that Plato reflects in the character of Socrates the primordial wisdom embodied in satyric drama. I conclude with a brief consideration of Nietzsche’s challenge to Plato’s Dionysian wisdom.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 89,330

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium.Ulrika Carlsson - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):41-67.
Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium.Gary Alan Scott & William A. Welton - 2008 - Albany, New York: State University of New York Press. Edited by William A. Welton.
Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's "Symposium".Anne Sheppard - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
88 (#173,996)

6 months
2 (#638,860)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references