Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press (2012)

Authors
Jill Gordon
Colby College
Abstract
Plato's entire fictive world is permeated with philosophical concern for Eros, well beyond the so-called erotic dialogues. Several metaphysical, epistemological and cosmological conversations - Timaeus, Cratylus, Parmenides, Theaetetus and Phaedo - demonstrate that Eros lies at the root of the human condition and that properly guided Eros is the essence of a life well lived. This book presents a holistic vision of Eros, beginning with the presence of Eros at the origin of the cosmos and the human soul, surveying four types of human self-cultivation aimed at good guidance of Eros and concluding with human death as a return to our origins. The book challenges conventional wisdom regarding the 'erotic dialogues' and demonstrates that Plato's world is erotic from beginning to end: the human soul is primordially erotic and the well-cultivated erotic soul can best remember and return to its origins, its lifelong erotic desire.
Keywords Love  Erotica Philosophy  Philosophy, Ancient  PHILOSOPHY / History & Surveys / Ancient & Classical
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Reprint years 2014
Buy this book $29.00 new   Amazon page
Call number B398.L9.G58 2012
ISBN(s) 9781107024113   9781107423572   9781139534536   1107024110   1107423570
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Plato. [REVIEW]Dominic Scott - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (2):170-180.
Socrates' Lesson to Hippothales in Plato's Lysis.Matthew D. Walker - 2020 - Classical Philology 115 (3):551-566.
Anagogic Love Between Neoplatonic Philosophers and Their Disciples in Late Antiquity.Donka Markus - 2016 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 10 (1):1-39.

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