How Ethical Systems Change: Tolerable Suffering and Assisted Dying

Routledge (2011)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Medical advances prolong life. They also sometimes prolong suffering. Should we protect life or alleviate suffering? This dilemma formed the foundation for a powerful right-to-die movement and a counterbalancing concern over an emerging culture of death. What are the qualities of a life worth living? Where are the boundaries of tolerable suffering? This book is based on a hugely popular undergraduate course taught at the University of Texas, and is ideal for those interested in the social construction of social worth, social problems, and social movements. This book is part of a larger text, Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?, http://www.routledge.com/9780415892476/

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 76,101

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Five words for assisted dying.Iain Brassington - 2008 - Law and Philosophy 27 (5):415 - 444.
The medicalization of dying.Michael M. Burgess - 1993 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):269-279.
Assisted suicide, suffering and the meaning of a life.Miles Little - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (3):287-298.
Ending Life, Morality, and Meaning.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):559-574.
The suicide tourist trap: Compromise across boundaries. [REVIEW]Richard Huxtable - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):327-336.

Analytics

Added to PP
2011-10-25

Downloads
0

6 months
0

Historical graph of downloads

Sorry, there are not enough data points to plot this chart.
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references