Optics of Thought: Logic and Vision in Müller, Helmholtz, and Frege

Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (4):365-378 (2000)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

The historical antecedents of Frege's treatment of binocular vision in "The thought" were the physiological writings of Johannes Mueller, Hermann von Helmholtz, and Emil du Bois-Reymond. In their research on human vision, logic was assigned an unexpected role: it was to be the means by which knowledge of a world extended in three dimensions arises from stimuli that are at best two-dimensional. An examination of this literature yields a richer understanding of Frege's insistence that a proper epistemology requires us to recognize the existence and importance of nonsensible sources of knowledge

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 94,749

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP
2010-08-24

Downloads
44 (#359,421)

6 months
5 (#879,741)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

David C. McCarty
Last affiliation: Indiana University, Bloomington

References found in this work

The Limits of our Knowledge of Nature.Emil du Bois-Reymond - 1874 - The Popular Science Monthly 5:17-32.

Add more references