Synthese 108 (3):361-377 (1996)

Authors
Jack Copeland
University of Canterbury
Abstract
It is not widely realised that Turing was probably the first person to consider building computing machines out of simple, neuron-like elements connected together into networks in a largely random manner. Turing called his networks unorganised machines. By the application of what he described as appropriate interference, mimicking education an unorganised machine can be trained to perform any task that a Turing machine can carry out, provided the number of neurons is sufficient. Turing proposed simulating both the behaviour of the network and the training process by means of a computer program. We outline Turing's connectionist project of 1948.
Keywords Computation  Computer  Connectionism  Metaphysics  Turing, A
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DOI 10.1007/BF00413694
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References found in this work BETA

Computing Machinery and Intelligence.Alan M. Turing - 1950 - Mind 59 (October):433-60.
On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the N Tscheidungsproblem.Alan Turing - 1936 - Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society 42 (1):230-265.
A Logical Calculus of the Ideas Immanent in Nervous Activity.Warren S. McCulloch & Walter Pitts - 1943 - The Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 5 (4):115-133.

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Triviality Arguments Against Functionalism.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (2):273 - 295.

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