The Thesis in the Roman Rhetorical Schools of the Republic

Classical Quarterly 1 (3-4):159- (1951)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Ancient rhetoric divided the questions which concerned the orator into the definite and the indefinite, quaestiones finitae and quaestiones infinitae, the former concerned with particular persons and occasions, the latter without any such reference. To take a simple example from Quintilian, ‘Should one marry?’ is a quaestio infinita, ‘Should Cato marry?’ a quaestio finita. The distinction was introduced, or at any rate first clearly formulated, by Hermagoras in the second century B.C., and became an established part of rhetorical theory. The Greek term for the indefinite, or general, question was none of the various Latin equivalents used by Cicero attained general currency, and the Greek term prevailed

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,197

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2010-12-09

Downloads
19 (#802,800)

6 months
1 (#1,477,342)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

Rhetoric in the Fourth Academy.Tobias Reinhardt - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (02):531-.
Rhetoric in the Fourth Academy.Tobias Reinhardt - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (2):531-547.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references