Knowing savagery: Humanity in the circuits of colonial knowledge

History of the Human Sciences 32 (4):3-7 (2019)
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Abstract

How was ‘savagery’ constituted as a field of colonial knowledge? As Europe’s empires expanded, their reach was marked not only by the colonisation of new territories but by the colonisation of knowledge. Path-breaking scholarship since the 1990s has shown how European knowledge of colonised territories and peoples developed from diverse travel writings, missionary texts, and exploration narratives from the 16th century onwards (Abulafia, 2008; Armitage, 2000; De Campos Françozo, 2017; Pratt, 1992). Of prime importance in this work has been the investigation of the pre-positioning of colonised peoples within categories derived from European traditions of historical, religious, legal, and political thought as either ‘savages’ or ‘barbarians’ (Richardson, 2018; Sebastiani, 2013).

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Bruce Buchan
Griffith University

References found in this work

The Myth of the Noble Savage.Terry Jay Ellingson - 2001 - Berkeley: University of California Press.

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