“He Offered Himself”: Sacrifice in Hebrews

Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 57 (3):251-265 (2003)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

As both priest and victim, Christ offered himself through sacrificial actions involving death, entry into the heavenly sanctuary, and cleansing by blood. Hebrews highlights the soteriological, psychological, and social benefits of this sacrifice

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 74,247

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Nietzsche and the Eternal Return of Sacrifice.K. D. - 2003 - Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):167-185.
Sacrifice In Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Paolo Diego Bubbio - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):1-19.
Kant’s Sacrificial Turns.Paolo Diego Bubbio - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):97-115.
Sacrifice Imagined: Violence, Atonement, and the Sacred.Douglas Hedley - 2011 - Continuum International Publishing Group.
Without the Least Tremor. Romero - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):241-248.
Anti-Judaism in Hebrews?Clark M. Williamson - 2003 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 57 (3):266-279.
Did Jesus Consider His Death to Be an Atoning Sacrifice?Daniel J. Antwi - 1991 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 45 (1):17-28.
Preferentism and Self‐Sacrifice.Chris Heathwood - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (1):18-38.
The Scriptural World Of Hebrews.Luke Timothy Johnson - 2003 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 57 (3):237-250.

Analytics

Added to PP
2013-11-24

Downloads
14 (#724,932)

6 months
1 (#415,205)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references