Christian Discourses; the Crisis and a Crisis in the Life of an ActressWithout Authority [Book Review]

Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):951-953 (1999)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Among the interlacing series of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous and acknowledged works published during his lifetime, the various sets of Christian discourses occupy a decisive place. These two volumes in particular share a close thematic relationship extending to the very topics written on—for example, the lessons taught by the birds of the air and the lilies of the field, or the right dispositions for receiving holy communion. Readers acquainted only with Kierkegaard’s more widely-read books, like Sickness unto Death, Philosophical Fragments, and Either/or, would do well to read his explicitly Christian writings if they wish to gain a better sense of the proper context and foundations of his thought. Looking back over his works in 1849, he discerned a progression “from ‘the poet,’ from the esthetic—from the philosopher, from the speculative—to the intimation of the most inward interpretation of the essentially Christian”.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 94,726

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Works of Love, Discourses, and Other Writings.M. Jamie Ferreira - 2008-10-17 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), Kierkegaard. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 122–147.
Kierkegaard as religious thinker.David Jay Gouwens - 1996 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
The Essential Kierkegaard.SørenHG Kierkegaard - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
Kierkegaard's Fragments and Postscript. [REVIEW]John W. Elrod - 1984 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (1):120-121.

Analytics

Added to PP
2019-06-10

Downloads
6 (#1,509,445)

6 months
2 (#1,486,765)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references