Results for 'word-word'

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  1. Horizons of the Word: Words and Tools in Perception and Action.Hayden Kee - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (5):905-932.
    In this paper I develop a novel account of the phenomenality of language by focusing on characteristics of perceived speech. I explore the extent to which the spoken word can be said to have a horizonal structure similar to that of spatiotemporal objects: our perception of each is informed by habitual associations and expectations formed through past experiences of the object or word and other associated objects and experiences. Specifically, the horizonal structure of speech in use can fruitfully (...)
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  2.  22
    The WordWord” and the Concept “Word.” Three Solutions to Grelling’s Paradox.Jari Palomäki - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):143-149.
    In this paper three different solutions to Grelling’s paradox, also called the heterological paradox, are given. Firstly, after given the original formulation of the paradox by Grelling and Nelson in 1908, a solution to this paradox offered by Frank Plumpton Ramsey in 1925 is presented. His solution is based on the different meanings of the word “meaning.” Secondly, Grelling himself advocated the solution proposed by Uuno Saarnio in 1937. Saarnio’s solution is based on the exact definitions of the concept (...)
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  3.  1
    Word, Words, Words: Ellul and the Mediocritization of Language.Frederick Foltz & Franz Foltz - 2012 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 32 (3):222-230.
    The authors explore how technique via propaganda has replaced the word with images creating a mass society and limiting the ability of people to act as individuals. They begin by looking at how words affect human society and how they have changed over time. They explore how technology has altered the meaning of words in order to create a more efficient world. Words become disconnected from time and space through the use of timeless images. The institutions of society support (...)
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  4.  3
    Plastic Words: Words Without Meaning.J. M. van der Laan - 2001 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 21 (5):349-353.
    Taking as its point of departure the works of Jacques Ellul, Sven Birkerts, George Steiner, Uwe Poerksen, and others, this article explores the status of language in a technicized civilization. It is argued that language has devolved under the impact of technology, particularly in the dimension of values and ethics. This diagnosis points to the way from which a possible cure may emerge.
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  5. Word and Object.Willard van Orman Quine - 1960 - Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.
    In the course of the discussion, Professor Quine pinpoints the difficulties involved in translation, brings to light the anomalies and conflicts implicit in our ...
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  6.  9
    Picture This! Words Versus Images in Wittgenstein's Nachlass Herbert Hrachovec.Words Versus Images In Wittgenstein'S. - 2004 - In Tamás Demeter (ed.), Essays on Wittgenstein and Austrian Philosophy: In Honour of J.C. Nyíri. Rodopi. pp. 197.
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  7.  4
    The Fluid Word: Word Processing and Its Mental Habits.Phil Mullins - 1988 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 63 (4):413-428.
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  8. Living Words: Meaning Underdetermination and the Dynamic Lexicon.Peter Ludlow - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Peter Ludlow shows how word meanings are much more dynamic than we might have supposed, and explores how they are modulated even during everyday conversation. The resulting view is radical, and has far-reaching consequences for our political and legal discourse, and for enduring puzzles in the foundations of semantics, epistemology, and logic.
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  9. Word and Object.Willard Van Orman Quine - 1960 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 17 (2):278-279.
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  10.  62
    Words and the World: Predictive Coding and the Language-Perception-Cognition Interface.Gary Lupyan & Andy Clark - 2015 - Current Directions in Psychological Science 24 (4):279-284.
    Can what we know change what we see? Does language affect cognition and perception? The last few years have seen increased attention to these seemingly disparate questions, but with little theoretical advance. We argue that substantial clarity can be gained by considering these questions through the lens of predictive processing, a framework in which mental representations—from the perceptual to the cognitive—reflect an interplay between downward-flowing predictions and upward-flowing sensory signals. This framework provides a parsimonious account of how what we know (...)
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  11. Code Words in Political Discourse.Justin Khoo - 2017 - Philosophical Topics 45 (2):33-64.
    I argue that code words like “inner city” do not semantically encode hidden or implicit meanings, and offer an account of how they nonetheless manage to bring about the surprising effects discussed in Mendelberg 2001, White 2007, and Stanley 2015.
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  12.  20
    Word Meanings Evolve to Selectively Preserve Distinctions on Salient Dimensions.Catriona Silvey, Simon Kirby & Kenny Smith - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (1):212-226.
    Words refer to objects in the world, but this correspondence is not one-to-one: Each word has a range of referents that share features on some dimensions but differ on others. This property of language is called underspecification. Parts of the lexicon have characteristic patterns of underspecification; for example, artifact nouns tend to specify shape, but not color, whereas substance nouns specify material but not shape. These regularities in the lexicon enable learners to generalize new words appropriately. How does the (...)
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  13.  14
    Words, Thoughts, and Theories.Alison Gopnik - 1997 - MIT Press.
    Recently, the theory theory has led to much interesting research. However, this is the first book to look at the theory in extensive detail and to systematically contrast it with other theories.
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  14.  75
    Word and Object.Willard Van Orman Quine, Patricia Smith Churchland & Dagfinn Føllesdal - 1960 - Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.
    Willard Van Orman Quine begins this influential work by declaring, "Language is asocial art.
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  15. On Words.John Hawthorne & Ernest Lepore - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (9):447-485.
    Under what conditions are two utterances utterances of the same word? What are words? That these questions have not received much attention is rather surprising: after all, philosophers and linguists frequently appeal to considerations about word and sentence identity in connection with a variety of puzzles and problems that are foundational to the very subject matter of philosophy of language and linguistics.1 Kaplan’s attention to words is thus to be applauded. And there is no doubt that his discussion (...)
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  16.  71
    Words and Thoughts: Subsentences, Ellipsis, and the Philosophy of Language.Robert Stainton - 2006 - Published in the United States by Oxford University Press.
    It is a near truism of philosophy of language that sentences are prior to words--that they are the only things that fundamentally have meaning. Robert's Stainton's study interrogates this idea, drawing on a wide body of evidence to argue that speakers can and do use mere words, not sentences, to communicate complex thoughts.
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  17. Magic Words: How Language Augments Human Computation.Andy Clark - 1998 - In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 162-183.
    Of course, words aren’t magic. Neither are sextants, compasses, maps, slide rules and all the other paraphenelia which have accreted around the basic biological brains of homo sapiens. In the case of these other tools and props, however, it is transparently clear that they function so as to either carry out or to facilitate computational operations important to various human projects. The slide rule transforms complex mathematical problems (ones that would baffle or tax the unaided subject) into simple tasks of (...)
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  18.  94
    Word and Object.Henry W. Johnstone - 1961 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (1):115-116.
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  19.  78
    Words, Species, and Kinds.J. T. M. Miller - 2021 - Metaphysics 4 (1):18–31.
    It has been widely argued that words are analogous to species such that words, like species, are natural kinds. In this paper, I consider the metaphysics of word-kinds. After arguing against an essentialist approach, I argue that word-kinds are homeostatic property clusters, in line with the dominant approach to other biological and psychological kinds.
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  20.  58
    Unruly Words: A Study of Vague Language.Diana Raffman - 2013 - Oxford, England: Oup Usa.
    In Unruly Words, Diana Raffman advances a new theory of vagueness which, unlike previous accounts, is genuinely semantic while preserving bivalence. According to this new approach, called the multiple range theory, vagueness consists essentially in a term's being applicable in multiple arbitrarily different, but equally competent, ways, even when contextual factors are fixed.
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  21. Slurring Words.Luvell Anderson & Ernie Lepore - 2013 - Noûs 47 (1):25-48.
  22. Every Word is a Name: Autonymy and Quotation in Augustine.Tamer Nawar - 2021 - Mind 130 (518):595-616.
    Augustine famously claims every word is a name. Some readers take Augustine to thereby maintain a purely referentialist semantic account according to which every word is a referential expression whose meaning is its extension. Other readers think that Augustine is no referentialist and is merely claiming that every word has some meaning. In this paper, I clarify Augustine’s arguments to the effect that every word is a name and argue that ‘every word is a name’ (...)
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  23.  1
    Word Order Universals.John A. Hawkins - 1983 - Academic Press.
  24. Words and Rules.Steven Pinker - manuscript
    The vast expressive power of language is made possible by two principles: the arbitrary soundmeaning pairing underlying words, and the discrete combinatorial system underlying grammar. These principles implicate distinct cognitive mechanisms: associative memory and symbolmanipulating rules. The distinction may be seen in the difference between regular inflection (e.g., walk-walked), which is productive and open-ended and hence implicates a rule, and irregular inflection (e.g., come-came, which is idiosyncratic and closed and hence implicates individually memorized words. Nonetheless, two very different theories have (...)
     
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  25.  22
    Just Words: Intentions, Tolerance and Lexical Selection.Una Stojnić - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    We all make mistakes in pronunciation and spelling, but a common view is that there are limits beyond which a mistaken pronunciation or spelling becomes too dramatic to be recognized as of a particular word at all. These considerations have bolstered a family of accounts that invoke speaker intentions and standards for tolerance as determinants of which word, if any, an utterance tokens. I argue this is a mistake. Neither intentions nor standards of tolerance are necessary or sufficient (...)
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  26.  67
    Words and Life.Hilary Putnam - 1994 - Harvard University Press.
    Hilary Putnam has been convinced for some time that the present situation in philosophy calls for revitalization and renewal; in this latest book he shows us ...
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  27.  10
    When Words Are Called For: A Defense of Ordinary Language Philosophy.Avner Baz - 2012 - Harvard University Press.
    The basic conflict: an initial characterization -- The main arguments against ordinary language philosophy -- Must philosophers rely on intuitions? -- Contextualism and the burden of knowledge -- Contextualism, anti-contextualism, and knowing as being in a position to give assurance -- Conclusion: skepticism and the dialectic of (semantically pure) "knowledge" -- Epilogue: ordinary language philosophy, Kant, and the roots of antinomial thinking.
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  28. Words, Thoughts, and Theories.Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 1999 - Mind 108 (430):395-398.
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  29.  1
    Using Words and Things: Language and Philosophy of Technology.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    This book offers a systematic framework for thinking about the relationship between language and technology and an argument for interweaving thinking about technology with thinking about language. The main claim of philosophy of technology—that technologies are not mere tools and artefacts not mere things, but crucially and significantly shape what we perceive, do, and are—is re-thought in a way that accounts for the role of language in human technological experiences and practices. Engaging with work by Wittgenstein, Heidegger, McLuhan, Searle, Ihde, (...)
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  30. Number Words as Number Names.Friederike Moltmann - 2017 - Linguistics and Philosophy 40 (4):331-345.
    This paper criticizes the view that number words in argument position retain the meaning they have on an adjectival or determiner use, as argued by Hofweber :179–225, 2005) and Moltmann :499–534, 2013a, 2013b). In particular the paper re-evaluates syntactic evidence from German given in Moltmann to that effect.
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  31. Loaded Words: On the Semantics and Pragmatics of Slurs.Kent Bach - 2018 - In David Sosa (ed.), Bad Words: Philosophical Perspectives on Slurs. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 60-76.
    There are many mean and nasty things to say about mean and nasty talk, but I don't plan on saying any of them. There's a specific problem about slurring words that I want to address. This is a semantic problem. It's not very important compared to the real-world problems presented by bigotry, racism, discrimination, and worse. It's important only to linguistics and the philosophy of language.
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  32.  43
    Words in the Brain's Language. PulvermÜ & Friedemann Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):253-279.
  33.  46
    Word Learning as Bayesian Inference.Fei Xu & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (2):245-272.
  34.  39
    Hard Words.Lila R. Gleitman, Anna Papafragou & John C. Trueswell - unknown
    How do children acquire the meaning of words? And why are words such as know harder for learners to acquire than words such as dog or jump? We suggest that the chief limiting factor in acquiring the vocabulary of natural languages consists not in overcoming conceptual difficulties with abstract word meanings but rather in mapping these meanings onto their corresponding lexical forms. This opening premise of our position, while controversial, is shared with some prior approaches. The present discussion moves (...)
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  35.  10
    Associability: A Study of the Properties of Associative Ratings and the Role of Association in Word-Word Learning.Richard Kammann - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (4p2):1.
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  36. Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas.Christopher Gauker - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    At least since Locke, philosophers and psychologists have usually held that concepts arise out of sensory perceptions, thoughts are built from concepts, and language enables speakers to convey their thoughts to hearers. Christopher Gauker holds that this tradition is mistaken about both concepts and language. The mind cannot abstract the building blocks of thoughts from perceptual representations. More generally, we have no account of the origin of concepts that grants them the requisite independence from language. Gauker's alternative is to show (...)
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  37. Bad Words: Philosophical Perspectives on Slurs.David Sosa (ed.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    What makes a word bad? On the one hand, slurs and other derogatory language appear to be meaningful - different slurs can seem to refer to different groups, for example. On the other hand, slurs can seem to be just an arbitrary tool for insulting or enabling harm. How is the meaning of a slur related to its practical uses?
     
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  38. Number Words and Reference to Numbers.Katharina Felka - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (1):261-282.
    A realist view of numbers often rests on the following thesis: statements like ‘The number of moons of Jupiter is four’ are identity statements in which the copula is flanked by singular terms whose semantic function consists in referring to a number (henceforth: Identity). On the basis of Identity the realists argue that the assertive use of such statements commits us to numbers. Recently, some anti-realists have disputed this argument. According to them, Identity is false, and, thus, we may deny (...)
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  39.  31
    Word Recognition as a Function of Retinal Locus.Mortimer Mishkin & Donald G. Forgays - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (1):43.
  40. Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation.Jay L. Garfield - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  41. Word & Object.W. V. O. Quine - 1960 - MIT Press.
     
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  42. When Words Speak Louder Than Actions: Delusion, Belief, and the Power of Assertion.David Rose, Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy (4):1-18.
    People suffering from severe monothematic delusions, such as Capgras, Fregoli, or Cotard patients, regularly assert extraordinary and unlikely things. For example, some say that their loved ones have been replaced by impostors. A popular view in philosophy and cognitive science is that such monothematic delusions aren't beliefs because they don't guide behaviour and affect in the way that beliefs do. Or, if they are beliefs, they are somehow anomalous, atypical, or marginal beliefs. We present evidence from five studies that folk (...)
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  43.  3
    Words and the Mind: How Words Capture Human Experience.Barbara Malt & Phillip M. Wolff (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The study of word meanings promises important insights into the nature of the human mind by revealing what people find to be most cognitively significant in their experience. However, as we learn more about the semantics of various languages, we are faced with an interesting problem. Different languages seem to be telling us different stories about the mind. For example, important distinctions made in one language are not necessarily made in others. What are we to make of these cross-linguistic (...)
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  44. Words and Phrases: Corpus Studies of Lexical Semantics.Michael Stubbs - 2001 - Blackwell.
    This book fills a gap in studies of meaning by providing detailed case studies of attested corpus data on the meanings of words and phrases.
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  45.  57
    What’s in a Word? Language Constructs Emotion Perception.Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):66-71.
    In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that concepts represented in language are used to create a perception of emotion from the constant ebb and flow of other people’s facial muscle movements. In this “construction hypothesis,” (cf. Gendron, Lindquist, Barsalou, & Barrett, 2012) (see also Barrett, 2006b; Barrett, Lindquist, & Gendron, 2007; Barrett, Mesquita, & Gendron, 2011), language plays a constitutive role in emotion perception because words ground the otherwise highly variable instances of an emotion category. We demonstrate that language (...)
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  46. Verbum: Word and Idea in Aquinas.Bernard J. F. Lonergan - 1967 - London: Darton, Longman & Todd.
    Presents Bernard Lonergan's five "verbum" articles that originally appeared in Theological studies. For Thomist students and scholars this "verbum" study offers a careful appraisal of the Thomist theory of knowledge as well as an introduction to the concepts found in Father Lonergan's "Insight". Since the concept of "verbum" dynamically affects the thought of Aquinas, it is necessary to grasp this concept to understand Thomist metaphysics and rational psychology. Lonergan has carefully analyzed and explicitly outlined "verbum"--An integral part of the Thomist (...)
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  47. Word and Objects.Agustín Rayo - 2002 - Noûs 36 (3):436–464.
    The aim of this essay is to show that the subject-matter of ontology is richer than one might have thought. Our route will be indirect. We will argue that there are circumstances under which standard first-order regimentation is unacceptable, and that more appropriate varieties of regimentation lead to unexpected kinds of ontological commitment.
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  48. Word, Niche and Super-Niche: How Language Makes Minds Matter More.Andy Clark - 2005 - Theoria 20 (54):255-268.
    How does language (spoken or written) impact thought? One useful way to approach this important but elusive question may be to consider language itself as a cognition-enhancing animal-built structure. To take this perspective is to view language as a kind of self-constructed cognitive niche. These self-constructed cognitive niches play, I suggest, three distinct but deeply interlocking roles in human thought and reason. Working together, these three interlocking routines radically transform the human mind, and mark a genuine discontinuity in the space (...)
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  49.  34
    Ostension: Word Learning and the Embodied Mind.Chad Engelland - 2014 - The MIT Press.
    Ostension is bodily movement that manifests our engagement with things, whether we wish it to or not. Gestures, glances, facial expressions: all betray our interest in something. Ostension enables our first word learning, providing infants with a prelinguistic way to grasp the meaning of words. Ostension is philosophically puzzling; it cuts across domains seemingly unbridgeable -- public--private, inner--outer, mind--body. In this book, Chad Engelland offers a philosophical investigation of ostension and its role in word learning by infants. Engelland (...)
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  50.  74
    Emotion Words, Regardless of Polarity, Have a Processing Advantage Over Neutral Words.Stavroula-Thaleia Kousta, David P. Vinson & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2009 - Cognition 112 (3):473-481.
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