Results for 'women's nature'

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  1. Kant on Moral Agency and Women's Nature.Mari Mikkola - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (1):89-111.
    Some commentators have condemned Kant’s moral project from a feminist perspective based on Kant’s apparently dim view of women as being innately morally deficient. Here I will argue that although his remarks concerning women are unsettling at first glance, a more detailed and closer examination shows that Kant’s view of women is actually far more complex and less unsettling than that attributed to him by various feminist critics. My argument, then, undercuts the justification for the severe feminist critique of Kant’s (...)
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  2. Women's Nature and Role in the Ideal Polis.Susan B. Levin - 1996 - In Julie K. Ward (ed.), Feminism and Ancient Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 13--30.
     
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  3. A Marxist Theory of Women's Nature.Nancy Holmstrom - 1984 - Ethics 94 (3):456-473.
  4.  1
    The Mormon Conception of Women’s Nature and Role: A Feminist Analysis.Caroline Kline - 2014 - Feminist Theology 22 (2):186-202.
    This paper explores the ways in which women’s nature has been defined as different from men’s in Mormonism. Unlike many mainstream Christian traditions, Mormons have a positive view of the Fall and of Eve, do not embrace the doctrine of original sin, and reject dualities which assign women to lower bodily categories in opposition to men’s higher rational ones. However, women in Mormonism are subordinated to men. This subordination is due, not to a sense that men are superior to (...)
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  5.  55
    Plato on Women’s Natural Ability: Revisiting Republic V and Timaeus 41e3–44d2 and 86b1–92c3.Chelsea Harry & Polansky Ron - 2016 - Apeiron 49 (3).
    Despite the prominent argument for equal educational opportunity for women inWe examine carefully Plato’s argument for the equal nature of women in.
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  6.  65
    Plato on Women’s Nature: Reflections on the Laws.Susan B. Levin - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):81-97.
  7.  12
    Plato on Women’s Nature: Reflections on the Laws.Susan B. Levin - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):81-97.
  8.  28
    Women's Views on the Moral Status of Nature in the Context of Prenatal Screening Decisions.E. Garcia, D. R. M. Timmermans & E. van Leeuwen - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):461-465.
    Appeals to the moral authority of nature play an important role in ethical discussions about the acceptability of prenatal testing. While opponents consider testing a dangerous violation of the moral inviolable course of nature, defenders see testing as a new step in improving dominion over nature. In this study we explored the meaning of appeals to nature among pregnant women to whom a prenatal screening test was offered and the impact of these appeals on their choices (...)
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  9. Slaves, Women, and Aristotle’s Natural Teleology.Joseph Karbowski - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):323-350.
  10.  1
    Book Reviews : Bricolaging (Women's) Bodies: Kathy Davis Reshaping the Female Body: The Dilemma of Cosmetic Surgery New York and London: Routledge, 1995, 211 Pp., ISBN 0-415-90632-6. Nelly Oudshoorn Beyond the Natural Body: An Archeology of Sex Hormones New York and London: Routledge, 1994, 195 Pp., ISBN 0-415-09191-8. José Van Dyck Manufacturing Babies and Public Consent: Debating the New Reproductive Technologies. London: Macmillan, 1995, 238 Pp., ISBN 0-333-62965-5. [REVIEW]Anna M. Lovell - 1996 - European Journal of Women's Studies 3 (3):319-323.
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  11.  36
    Women’s Work, Child Care, and Helpers-at-the-Nest in a Hunter-Gatherer Society.Raymond Hames & Patricia Draper - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):319-341.
    Considerable research on helpers-at-the-nest demonstrates the positive effects of firstborn daughters on a mother’s reproductive success and the survival of her children compared with women who have firstborn sons. This research is largely restricted to agricultural settings. In the present study we ask: “Does ‘daughter first’ improve mothers’ reproductive success in a hunting and gathering context?” Through an analysis of 84 postreproductive women in this population we find that the sex of the first- or second-born child has no effect on (...)
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  12. “A Chambered Nautilus”: The Contradictory Nature of Puerto Rican Women's Role in the Social Construction of a Transnational Community.Marixsa Alicea - 1997 - Gender and Society 11 (5):597-626.
    Recent transnational migration literature does not sufficiently explore women's role in the development of transnational communities. By analyzing 30 interviews with Puerto Rican migrant and return migrant women, the author shows that women, through subsistence production, play a significant role in the social construction of transnational communities. By using a transnational perspective and placing migrant women's subsistence work and its contradictory nature at the center of her analysis, the author challenges studies that assume that maintaining ties to (...)
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  13.  19
    Women’s Fertility Across the Cycle Increases the Short-Term Attractiveness of Creative Intelligence.Martie G. Haselton & Geoffrey F. Miller - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (1):50-73.
    Male provisioning ability may have evolved as a “good dad” indicator through sexual selection, whereas male creativity may have evolved partly as a “good genes” indicator. If so, women near peak fertility (midcycle) should prefer creativity over wealth, especially in short-term mating. Forty-one normally cycling women read vignettes describing creative but poor men vs. uncreative but rich men. Women’s estimated fertility predicted their short-term (but not long-term) preference for creativity over wealth, in both their desirability ratings of individual men (r=.40, (...)
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  14.  6
    Domesticating Deathcare: The Women of the U.S. Natural Deathcare Movement.Philip R. Olson - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (2):195-215.
    This article examines the women-led natural deathcare movment in the early 21st century U.S., focusing upon the movement’s non-coincidental epistemological and gender-political similarities to the natural childbirth movement. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach and drawing upon the author’s intensive interviews with pioneers and leaders of the U.S. natural deathcare movement, as well as from the author’s own participation in the movement, this article argues that the political similarities between the countercultural natural childbirth and natural deathcare movements reveal a common cultural provocation—one (...)
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  15.  4
    Women’s Strategies in Polygynous Marriage.Monique Borgerhoff Mulder - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (1):45-70.
    Both behavioral ecological and social anthropological analyses of polygynous marriage tend to emphasize the importance of competition among men in acquisition of mates, whereas the strategic options to women both prior to and after the establishment of a marriage have been neglected. Focusing on African marriage systems that are in some senses analogous to resource-defense polygyny, I first review the evidence of reproductive costs of polygyny to women. Then I discuss why the conflict of interests between men and women over (...)
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  16. Women's Movements Around the World:: Cross-Cultural Comparisons.Diane Rothbard Margolis - 1993 - Gender and Society 7 (3):379-399.
    This article develops a framework for cross-national comparisons of contemporary women's movements. The article focuses on the international context and cross-national influences, the nature of the state, the absence or presence of other movements, the effects of conservative or liberal political environments, the effects of centralization or dispersion within the movement itself and on feminist involvement in political parties and elections. Because each of these factors shapes a particular movement, the article concludes that there cannot be one correct (...)
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  17.  1
    Women’s Perceptions of Childbirth “Choices”: Competing Discourses of Motherhood, Sexuality, and Selflessness.Tiffany Boulton & Claudia Malacrida - 2012 - Gender and Society 26 (5):748-772.
    Women in North America have many childbirth options. However, they must make these choices within a complex culture of birthing discourse characterized by competing knowledges and claims regarding the “ideal birth” as medicalized, natural, or woman centered. We interviewed 21 childless women and 22 new mothers to explore their perceptions of choice and birthing. The women’s interviews indicated that their birthing choices are reflective of tensions embedded in normative femininity; conflicting ideas relating to purity, dignity, and the messiness of birth; (...)
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  18.  70
    Women's Brains.Stephen Jay Gould - unknown
    IN THE PRELUDE to Middlemarch, George Eliot lamented the unfulfilled lives of talented women: Some have felt that these blundering lives are due to the inconvenient indefiniteness with which the Supreme Power has fashioned the natures of women: if there were one level of feminine incompetence as strict as the ability to count three and no more, the social lot of women might be treated with scientific certitude. Eliot goes on to discount the idea of innate limitation, but while she (...)
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  19.  23
    Women and Nature: The Roar Inside Her.Susan Griffin - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):225-238.
    In Woman and Nature: The Roaring Inside Her, Susan Griffin's embedding of language and culture within the natural world implicitly offers a critique of widespread assumptions, shared by many feminists, that language belongs only to the powerful and that it is inherently violent. Griffin's depiction of the process through which women come to speech is illuminated by V. N. Vološinov's work on the multiaccentuality of language and by Trinh Minh-ha's characterizations of oral traditions. Both authors stress the constant re-creation (...)
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  20.  8
    Women’s Viewpoints on Egg Freezing in Austria: An Online Q-Methodology Study.Johanna Kostenzer, Antoinette de Bont & Job van Exel - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    Background Egg freezing has emerged as a technology of assisted reproductive medicine that allows women to plan for the anticipated loss of fertility and hence to preserve the option to conceive with their own eggs. The technology is surrounded by value-conflicts and is subject to ongoing discussions. This study aims at contributing to the empirical-ethical debate by exploring women’s viewpoints on egg freezing in Austria, where egg freezing for social reasons is currently not allowed. Methods Q-methodology was used to identify (...)
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  21.  49
    Women and Natural Hierarchy in Aristotle.María Luisa Femenías - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):164 - 172.
    In this paper, I examine the frame of reference in Aristotle's Politics within which he makes claims about women and their place in his conception of politics.
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  22. Women's Military Roles Cross-Nationally: Past, Present, and Future.Mady Wechsler Segal - 1995 - Gender and Society 9 (6):757-775.
    This article outlines a theory of what affects the degree and nature of women's participation in the armed forces throughout history and across nations. Examining national security situations, military technology, military accession policies, demographic patterns, cultural values regarding gender, and structural patterns of gender roles, the article proposes a systematic theory of the conditions under which women's military roles expand and contract. The theory is then applied to analyze women's likely future role in armed forces. The (...)
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  23. Women's Organizations and Movements in the Commonwealth Caribbean: The Response to Global Economic Crisis in the 1980s.Rhoda Reddock - 1998 - Feminist Review 59 (1):57-73.
    In this paper I explore the emergence of women's organizations and feminist consciousness in the twentieth century in the English-speaking Caribbean. The global ideas concerning women's equality from the 1960s onwards clearly informed the initiatives taken by both women and states of the Caribbean. None the less, the paper illustrates, by use of examples, the interlocked nature of women's struggles with the economic, social and political issues which preoccupy the region's population. I examine in greater detail (...)
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  24. Kipsigis Women's Preferences for Wealthy Men: Evidence for Female Choice in Mammals?Monique Borcerhoff Mulder - forthcoming - Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
     
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  25.  49
    Women's Fashion: Function of Sex or Social Construction?Robert C. Trundle - 2009 - Cultura 6 (2):46-67.
    A perennial influence on the aesthetics of fashion, fostered by Plato and Aristotle, is challenged today by a prevalent social constructionism. The latter embraces an impracticable biodenial as well as an incoherent epistemic relativism, reminiscent of Greek Sophism, whereby truth-claims about good fashion may be both true and false either in the same culture at different times or at the same time in different cultures. But a normative aesthetics of Aristotle and Plato, that affirms an epistemic realism, roots women's (...)
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  26.  16
    Women’s Fashion: Function of Sex or Social Construction?Robert C. Trundle - 2009 - Cultura 6 (2):46-67.
    A perennial influence on the aesthetics of fashion, fostered by Plato and Aristotle, is challenged today by a prevalent social constructionism. The latter embraces an impracticable biodenial as well as an incoherent epistemic relativism, reminiscent of Greek Sophism, whereby truth-claims about good fashion may be both true and false either in the same culture at different times or at the same time in different cultures. But a normative aesthetics of Aristotle and Plato, that affirms an epistemic realism, roots women’s fashion (...)
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  27. Women’s Talk, Mothers’ Work: Korean Mothers’ Address Terms, Solidarity, and Power.Minju Kim - 2015 - Discourse Studies 17 (5):551-582.
    This study analyzes 400 minutes of natural conversations between Korean married women and investigates their interactions with focus on their use of address terms to index closeness. In particular, it examines the emergence of the female solidarity term caki ‘you’, and demonstrates solidarity’s entailment of power. Traditionally, Korean women with children have been addressed by reference to their children’s names even by her friends. Caki, which allows friends to directly address each other, has become a popular alternative, indicating solidarity. In (...)
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  28.  82
    Beyond Adaptive Preferences: Rethinking Women's Complicity in Their Own Subordination.Charlotte Knowles - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    An important question confronting feminist philosophers is why women are sometimes complicit in their own subordination. The dominant view holds that complicity is best understood in terms of adaptive preferences. This view assumes that agents will naturally gravitate away from subordination and towards flourishing, as long as they do not have things imposed on them that disrupt this trajectory. However, there is reason to believe that ‘impositions’ do not explain all of the ways in which complicity can arise. This paper (...)
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  29.  15
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Women’s Entrepreneurship: Towards a More Adequate Theory of “Work”.Mary Johnstone-Louis - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):569-602.
    ABSTRACT:Programs aimed at increasing women’s entrepreneurship are a rapidly proliferating class of CSR initiatives across the globe with participation by many of the world’s largest corporations. The gendered nature of this phenomenon suggests that feminist approaches to CSR may offer a particularly salient mode of their analysis. In this article, I argue that insights from feminist economics regarding the historically prevalent—but narrow and gendered—definition of work, which artificially separates production from reproduction, provide fruitful tools for theory building when conceptualizing (...)
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  30.  7
    Women’s Reaction to Opposite- and Same-Sex Infidelity in Three Cultures.Scott W. Semenyna, Francisco R. Gómez Jiménez & Paul L. Vasey - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):450-469.
    Previous research indicates that Euro-American women are more upset by imagining their male partners committing homosexual infidelities than heterosexual ones. The present studies sought to replicate these findings and extend them to two non-Western cultures wherein masculine men frequently engage in sexual interactions with feminine third-gender males. Across six studies in three cultural locales, women were asked to rate their degree of upset when imagining that their partner committed infidelity that was heterosexual in nature, as well as infidelity that (...)
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  31.  24
    Women’s Standpoints and Internalism in Sport.Michael Burke - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):39-52.
    David Fairchild explains that sport is an evocative symbolic system that demonstrates the apparently ‘natural’ division of humans into two separate and dichotomous genders, and also demonstrates the apparently ‘genetically based’ hierarchy between the genders in terms of sporting results. Additionally, this hierarchy of performance translates into a hierarchy of authority, such that men occupy the most powerful positions in coaching, administration and the sports media. The initial section of this paper will follow on from Fairchild to suggest some changes (...)
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  32.  31
    Attractiveness and Rivalry in Women’s Friendships with Women.April Bleske-Rechek & Melissa Lighthall - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (1):82-97.
    Past research suggests that young women perceive their same-sex friends as both facilitating the pursuit of desirable mates and competing for access to desirable mates. We propose that similar levels of physical attractiveness between young adult female friends might be one explanation for the opposing forces in their friendships. Forty-six female friendship pairs completed questionnaires about themselves, their friend, and their friendship; in addition, each woman’s picture was rated by a set of nine naive judges. Friends were similar in both (...)
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  33.  10
    Women's Work as Political Art: Weaving and Dialectical Politics in Homer, Aristophanes, and Plato.Lisa Pace Vetter - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    This book shows that the metaphor of the quintessentially feminine art of weaving in Homer's Odyssey, Aristophanes' Lysistrata, and Plato's Statesman and Phaedo conveys complex and inclusive teachings about human nature and political life that address the concerns of women more effectively than commonly believed.
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  34.  1
    Mexican Women's Pelves and Obstetrical Procedures: Interventions with Forceps in Late 19th-Century Medicine.Paul Kersey & Laura Cházaro - 2005 - Feminist Review 79 (1):100-115.
    This essay is an inquiry into the socio-cultural history of the use of forceps in 19th-century Mexico. It argues that the knowledge and practices that the use of such instruments implied were related to complex and controversial issues of the time regarding gender, race and national identity. In my study of operations involving forceps, I found that the adoption of medical instruments depended not only upon their supposedly greater operative efficiency but also upon the political and medical meanings attributed to (...)
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  35.  43
    Body Shape and Women’s Attractiveness.Devendra Singh - 1993 - Human Nature 4 (3):297-321.
    This paper examines the role of body fat distribution as measured by waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) on the judgment of women’s physical attractiveness. It presents evidence that WHR is correlated with a woman’s reproductive endocrinological status and long-term health risk. Three studies were conducted to investigate whether humans have perceptual and cognitive mechanisms to utilize the WHR to infer attributes of women’s health, youthfulness, attractiveness, and reproductive capacity. College-age as well as older subjects of both sexes rank female figures with normal (...)
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  36.  5
    Women’s Strategies in Polygynous Marriage.Monique Borgerhoff Mulder - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (1):45-70.
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  37.  5
    International Women’s Day 2019: In Conversation with Harriet Wistrich.Harriet Samuels - 2019 - Feminist Legal Studies 27 (3):311-331.
    This reflection item provides an edited account of human rights lawyer Harriet Wistrich’s conversation with Manvir Grewal, Visiting Lecturer and Ph.D. student, and Harriet Samuels, Reader in Law at the University of Westminster. It summarises the exchange which focused on Harriet Wistrich’s career trajectory and the many public interest law cases that she has brought on behalf her clients, mainly women, in both domestic and international forums. It also includes a condensed version of the question and answer session with the (...)
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  38.  20
    We Are Not Born Submissive: How Patriarchy Shapes Women's Lives.Manon Garcia - 2021 - Princeton, NJ, USA: Princeton University Press.
    What role do women play in the perpetuation of patriarchy? On the one hand, popular media urges women to be independent, outspoken, and career-minded. Yet, this same media glorifies a specific, sometimes voluntary, female submissiveness as a source of satisfaction. In philosophy, even less has been said on why women submit to men and the discussion has been equally contradictory—submission has traditionally been considered a vice or pathology, but female submission has been valorized as innate to women’s nature. Is (...)
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  39.  41
    Women's Writing and the Early Modern Genre Wars.Karen Green - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):499-515.
    This paper explores two phases of the early modern genre wars. The first was fought by Marie de Gournay, in her “Preface” to Montaigne's Essays, on behalf of her adoptive father and in defense of his naked and masculine prose. The second was fought half a century later by Nicholas Boileau in opposition to Gournay's feminizing successor, Madeleine de Scudéry. In this debate Gournay's position is egalitarian, whereas Scudéry's approximates to a feminism of difference. It is claimed that both female (...)
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  40. Aristotle on Character, Women, and Natural Slaves.Lok Hoe - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (2).
    This article discusses Aristotle’s notion of character, and how it should be presented in a play, such as a tragic drama. In Poetics 1450a 24, Aristotle entertains the possibility of a tragedy without character, and commentators have argued about whether a tragic drama can really unfold without characters of its agents being manifested; and whether Aristotle really meant a tragic drama that is completely devoid of character, or simply one that contains personalities that are considered to be stereotyped or wooden. (...)
     
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  41.  4
    Women's Deities in the Religions of the Abrahamic Tradition.N. I. Nedzelska - 2001 - Ukrainian Religious Studies 19:15-23.
    It is not objectionable in modern science that the woman was deified earlier than her husband, and the sacred books of religions of the Abrahamic tradition capture the next stage of society's development: the transition to a new way of farming and the rule of man in all spheres of life. Judaism and Islam did not recognize the cult of the goddesses and always struggled with it. For the Jews, Yahweh was both a patron of women. In Judaism, a woman (...)
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  42. Mendelssohnian Enlightenment and Women’s Contributions to Philosophy in the Late Eighteenth Century.Corey W. Dyck - manuscript
    When attempting to capture the concept of enlightenment that underlies and motivates philosophical (and political and scientific) developments in the 18th century, historians of philosophy frequently rely upon a needlessly but intentionally exclusive account. This, namely, is the conception of enlightenment first proposed by Kant in his famous essay of 1784, which takes enlightenment to consist in the “emergence from the self-imposed state of minority” and which is only possible for a “public” to attain as a result of the public (...)
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  43.  14
    Stigmatizing Women's Aggressive Behavior: Who Does It Benefit and Why?Marc A. Johnston & Charles B. Crawford - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):226-227.
    Why is female violence a taboo? We suggest that both men and women actively contribute to the creation of this stigma. Men may benefit because nonaggressive women may make better mothers and be more faithful and fertile. Females may benefit by downplaying their aggressive nature because they will be perceived as more valuable mates and because they will be more accepted within female social groups.
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  44.  33
    Beyond Adaptive Preferences: Rethinking Women's Complicity in Their Own Subordination.Charlotte Knowles - forthcoming - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy.
    An important question confronting feminist philosophers is why women are sometimes complicit in their own subordination. The dominant view holds that complicity is best understood in terms of adaptive preferences. This view assumes that agents will naturally gravitate away from subordination and towards flourishing, as long as they do not have things imposed on them that disrupt this trajectory. However, there is reason to believe that ‘impositions’ do not explain all of the ways in which complicity can arise. This paper (...)
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  45.  32
    Islamo-Arabic Culture and Women’s Law: An Introduction to the Sociology of Women’s Law in Islam.Abbas Mehregan - 2016 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):405-424.
    The present paper addresses the mutual relationship between society and law in shaping women’s law in Islam from the perspective of the sociology of law. It analyzes the role of pre-Islamic social, political, and economic structures in the Arabian Peninsula in modeling women’s law and highlights some customary laws which were rejected or revived and integrated in Islamic jurisprudence. In this regard, the paper reviews issues such as polygyny, rights to inheritance, marriage, the process of testimony and acceptable forms of (...)
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  46.  87
    The Speculum of Ignorance: The Women's Health Movement and Epistemologies of Ignorance.Nancy Tuana - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):1-19.
    This essay aims to clarify the value of developing systematic studies of ignorance as a component of any robust theory of knowledge. The author employs feminist efforts to recover and create knowledge of women's bodies in the contemporary women's health movement as a case study for cataloging different types of ignorance and shedding light on the nature of their production. She also helps us understand the ways resistance movements can be a helpful site for understanding how to (...)
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  47.  10
    Women’s Auto/Biography and Dissociative Identity Disorder: Implications for Mental Health Practice.Kendal Tomlinson & Charley Baker - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (3):365-387.
    Dissociative Identity Disorder is an uncommon disorder that has long been associated with exposure to traumatic stressors exceeding manageable levels commonly encompassing physical, psychological and sexual abuse in childhood that is prolonged and severe in nature. In DID, dissociation continues after the traumatic experience and produces a disruption in identity where distinct personality states develop. These personalities are accompanied by variations in behaviour, emotions, memory, perception and cognition. The use of literature in psychiatry can enrich comprehension over the subjective (...)
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  48. Reclaiming the Lives and Experiences of Pioneering Women in Mathematics: Eva Kaufholz-Soldat and Nicola M. R. Oswald (Eds): Against All Odds: Women’s Ways to Mathematical Research Since 1800. Cham: Springer Nature, 2020, Xxi+319pp, €135.19, £109.99, $159.99 HB. [REVIEW]K. G. Valente - 2021 - Metascience 30 (3):499-502.
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  49.  1
    Trading On Heterosexuality: College Women's Gender Strategies and Homophobia.Laura Hamilton - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (2):145-172.
    In this study, the author uses ethnographic and interview data from a women's floor in a university residence hall to examine how some heterosexual women's gender strategies contribute to their homophobia. The author describes a prevailing heterosexual erotic market on campus—the Greek party scene—and the status hierarchy linked to it. Within this hierarchy, heterosexual women assign lesbians low rank because of their assumed disinterest in the erotic market and perceived inability to acquire men's erotic attention. Active partiers invest (...)
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  50. Dallas and Critical Spectatorship, and a Manuscript in Progress, Aristotle on Essence and Human Nature. Cynthia A. Freeland is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Women's Studies at the University of Houston. She has Published Widely on Topics in Ancient Philosophy and Aesthetics, is The. [REVIEW]Matt Hills, Deborah Knight & George McKnight - 2003 - In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press. pp. 291.
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