Results for 'visual field'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  48
    The Visual Field in Russell and Wittgenstein.Michael O'Sullivan - 2015 - Philosophical Investigations 38 (4):316-332.
    Bertrand Russell developed a conception of the nature of the visual field, and of other sensory fields, as part of his project of explaining the construction of the external world. Wittgenstein's remarks on the visual field in the Tractatus are in part a response to Russell. Wittgenstein, against Russell, analyses the visual field in terms of facts rather than objects. Further, his conception of the field is, in a distinctive sense, depsychologised.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  37
    The visual field and the visual world: a reply to Professor Boring.James J. Gibson - 1952 - Psychological Review 59 (2):149-151.
  3.  25
    Visual field articulation in the absence of spatial stimulus gradients.Carl R. Brown & J. W. Gebhard - 1948 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (2):188.
  4.  30
    Visual field position and word-recognition threshold.Willis Overton & Morton Wiener - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (2):249.
  5.  18
    Adaptation to a rotated visual field as a function of degree of optical tilt and exposure time.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (5):629.
  6. Truth and the visual field.Barry Smith - 1999 - In Jean Petitot, Francisco J. Varela, Bernard Pachoud & Jean-Michel Roy (eds.), Naturalizing Phenomenology: Issues in Contemporary Phenomenology and Cognitive Science. Stanford University Press. pp. 317-329.
    The paper uses the tools of mereotopology (the theory of parts, wholes and boundaries) to work out the implications of certain analogies between the 'ecological psychology' of J. J Gibson and the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl. It presents an ontological theory of spatial boundaries and of spatially extended entities. By reference to examples from the geographical sphere it is shown that both boundaries and extended entities fall into two broad categories: those which exist independently of our cognitive acts (for example, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  7.  28
    Visual field and the letter span.Herbert F. Crovitz & H. Richard Schiffman - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (2):218.
  8.  65
    Visual Field and Empty Space.Kristjan Laasik - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy (published online):403-411.
    In a paper titled “Seeing Empty Space,” Louise Richardson argues for the thesis that seeing empty space involves a certain “structural feature,” namely, “it [s] seeming to one as if some region of space is one in which if some visible object were there, one would see it” (SF; Richardson, 2010, p. 237). I will argue that there is a reason to question whether a structural feature such as SF is needed in order to visually experience empty space. I will (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. The Visual Field and Perception.D. W. Hamlyn & A. C. Lloyd - 1957 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 31:107-144.
  10.  26
    Visual Field Advantage: Redefined by Training?Scott A. Stone, Jared Baker, Rob Olsen, Robbin Gibb, Jon Doan, Joshua Hoetmer & Claudia L. R. Gonzalez - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  28
    Effects of the visual field upon perception of change in spatial orientation.Norman L. Corah - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):598.
  12. Sensorimotor expectations and the visual field.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2018 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 17):3991-4006.
    Sensorimotor expectations concern how visual experience covaries with bodily movement. Sensorimotor theorists argue from such expectations to the conclusion that the phenomenology of vision is constitutively embodied: objects within the visual field are experienced as 3-D because sensorimotor expectations partially constitute our experience of such objects. Critics argue that there are two ways to block the above inference: to explain how we visually experience objects as 3-D, one may appeal to such non-bodily factors as expectations about movements (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  13.  27
    Effective visual field size necessary for vertical reading during Japanese text processing.Naoyuki Osaka & Koichi Oda - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (4):345-347.
  14.  16
    Transposing Gestalt Phenomena from Visual Fields to Practical and Interactional Work: Garfinkel’s and Sacks’ Social Praxeology.Michael Eisenmann Lynch - 2022 - Philosophia Scientiae:95-122.
    In lectures and writings in the decades following the publication of Studies in Ethnomethodology [1967], Harold Garfinkel, the founder of ethnomethodology, developed what he called a “misreading” of the phenomenological writings of Aron Gurwitsch, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and others. Garfinkel’s “misreading” included a selective and creative treatment of themes that Gurwitsch drew from Gestalt psychology, such as figure-ground, Gestalt contexture, and the phenomenal field. Rather than identifying these themes with visual perception demonstrated with picture-puzzles (for example, of animals hidden (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  50
    Does visual-field specialization really have implications for coordinated visual-motor behavior?Richard A. Abrams - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):542-543.
  16.  12
    Typical visual-field locations facilitate access to awareness for everyday objects.Daniel Kaiser & Radoslaw M. Cichy - 2018 - Cognition 180 (C):118-122.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  13
    Visual field asymmetries in object individuation.Irina M. Harris, Cara Wong & Sally Andrews - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 37:194-206.
  18. Three varieties of visual field.Austen Clark - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):477-95.
    The goal of this paper is to challenge the rather insouciant attitude that many investigators seem to adopt when they go about describing the items and events in their " visual fields". There are at least three distinct categories of interpretation of what these reports might mean, and only under one of those categories do those reports have anything resembling an observational character. The others demand substantive revisions in one's beliefs about what one sees. The ur-concept of a " (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  19.  39
    Dissociating the effects of attention and contingency awareness on evaluative conditioning effects in the visual paradigm.Andy P. Field & Annette C. Moore - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (2):217-243.
    Two experiments are described that investigate the effects of attention in moderating evaluative conditioning (EC) effects in a picture‐picture paradigm in which previously discovered experimental artifacts (e.g., Field & Davey, 1999 Field, AP, and Davey, GCL, (1999). Reevaluating evaluative conditioning: A nonassociative explanation of conditioning effects in the visual evaluative conditioning paradigm, Journal of Experimental Psychology. Animal Behavior Processes 25 ((1999)), pp. 211–224.[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]) were overcome by counterbalancing conditioned stimuli (CSs) and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  20.  31
    Elimination of visual field effects by use of a single report technique: Evidence for order-of-report artifact.Marylin C. Smith & Susan Ramunas - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):23.
  21. Peripheral visual field size necessary for visual search during Japanese text reading: effect of working memory.M. Osaka & N. Osaka - 1996 - In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview Pub. Co. pp. 75-76.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  13
    Working memory modulates the anger superiority effect in central and peripheral visual fields.Xiang Li, Zhen Lin, Yufei Chen & Mingliang Gong - 2023 - Cognition and Emotion 37 (2):271-283.
    Angry faces have been shown to be detected more efficiently in a crowd of distractors compared to happy faces, known as the anger superiority effect (ASE). The present study investigated whether the ASE could be modified by top-down manipulation of working memory (WM), in central and peripheral visual fields. In central vision, participants held a colour in WM for a final memory test while simultaneously performing a visual search task that required them to determine whether a face showed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  8
    Self-Perception and the Relation to Actual Driving Abilities for Individuals With Visual Field Loss.Jan Andersson, Tomas Bro & Timo Lajunen - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    BackgroundIn Sweden, individuals with visual field loss have their driving license withdrawn. The literature clearly indicates that individuals with VFL are unsafe drivers on a group level. However, many drivers with VFL can be safe on an individual level. The literature also suggests that self-perception, beliefs, and insights of one’s own capabilities are related to driving performance. This study had three aims: To investigate self-perceived driving capability ratings for individuals with VFL; to compare these ratings between groups with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  7
    The Gibsonian visual field.Edwin G. Boring - 1952 - Psychological Review 59 (3):246-247.
  25.  16
    The upper visual field advantage for face-processing: A product of endogenous attentional bias?Quek Genevieve & Finkbeiner Matthew - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  26.  19
    Effects of visual field of presentation and stimulus characteristics on visual discrimination learning.Patricia Y. LeFebvre & Sunnan K. Kubose - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (1):13-15.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  14
    The left visual field attentional advantage: No evidence of different speeds of processing across visual hemifields.Miguel A. García-Pérez & Rocío Alcalá-Quintana - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 37 (C):16-26.
  28.  27
    Transient increase of intact visual field size by high-frequency narrow-band stimulation.Mark A. Elliott, Doerthe Seifert, Dorothe A. Poggel & Hans Strasburger - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:45-55.
  29.  41
    Studies in space orientation. III. Perception of the upright in the absence of a visual field.H. A. Witkin & S. E. Asch - 1948 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):603.
  30.  37
    Studies in space orientation: I. Perception of the upright with displaced visual fields.S. E. Asch & H. A. Witkin - 1948 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):325.
  31. Symposium: The Visual Field and Perception.D. W. Hamlyn & A. C. Lloyd - 1957 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 31:107-144.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  7
    Scotomas and the visual field.Adam Morton - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):456.
  33.  6
    Analysing real-world visual search tasks helps explain what the functional visual field is, and what its neural mechanisms are.John Campion - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40:e133.
    Rejecting information-processing-based theory permits the merging of a top-down analysis of visual search tasks with a bottom-up analysis of brain structure and function. This reveals the true nature of the functional visual field and its precise role in the conduct of visual search tasks. The merits of such analyses over the traditional methods of the authors are described.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. There are no visual fields (and no minds either).Mark Johnston - 2011 - Analytic Philosophy 52 (4):231-242.
  35.  17
    The basis of the flicker in the visual field surrounding the test-object.S. H. Bartley - 1936 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):342.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  16
    Unexplained Progressive Visual Field Loss in the Presence of Normal Retinotopic Maps.Christina Moutsiana, Radwa Soliman, Lee de Wit, Merle James-Galton, Martin I. Sereno, Gordon T. Plant & D. Samuel Schwarzkopf - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  23
    There’s something in your eye: ethical implications of augmented visual field devices.Marty J. Wolf, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Keith W. Miller - 2016 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 14 (3):214-230.
    Purpose This paper aims to explore the ethical and social impact of augmented visual field devices, identifying issues that AVFDs share with existing devices and suggesting new ethical and social issues that arise with the adoption of AVFDs. Design/methodology/approach This essay incorporates both a philosophical and an ethical analysis approach. It is based on Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, philosophical notions of transparency and presence and human values including psychological well-being, physical well-being, privacy, deception, informed consent, ownership and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  48
    Forma (estructura) y fenomenología en Ortega. Un análisis del “campo visual” en el entorno de las Meditaciones / (Form (structure) and Phenomenology in Ortega. An analysis of “visual field” in the surroundings in the 'Meditations [on Quixote]'.Jesús González Fisac - 2011 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 36 (1):117-137.
    Los estudios sobre la fenomenología de Ortega apenas han atendido al víncunlo entre forma o estructura y campo del fenómeno. Ortega ha insistido en la formalidad del ámbito de aparición de los fenómenos, que ha vinculado con su radicalidad. La forma del ámbito emerge dentro del campo como un juego de diferencias, de la que el par superficie/ profundidad es el fundamental. En este trabajo vamos a mostrar que la formalidad del ámbito tiene un ejemplo señalado en los análisis del (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  18
    A response instruction by visual-field interaction: S-R compatibility effect or?Bill Cotton, Ovid J. L. Tzeng & Curtis Hardyck - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (6):475-477.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  12
    On Simultaneous Masking in the Visual Field.Giovanni Bruno Vicario - 2003 - Global Philosophy 13 (3-4):399-432.
    The concept of simultaneous masking in visual field is discussed, in the light of classical examples, of the various kinds of the phenomenon, of a modal completion, of the figure/ground phenomenon, of ambiguous and reversible figures, of mimicry and camouflage and eventually of the complexity of the stimulus. There is some reference to masking in auditory field. The “reality” of the masked configuration is discussed, drawing the conclusion that it is perceptually unreal. The fact that the masking (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  64
    The vertical-horizontal illusion and the visual field.Theodor M. Künnapas - 1957 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (6):405.
  42.  15
    Peripheral lower visual fields: A neglected factor?Naoyuki Osaka - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):555-555.
  43.  25
    Relation of the narrowing of the visual field with an increase in distance to manifest anxiety.Harald-Edwin Schmidt - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (4):334.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  17
    Modifications of Visual Field Asymmetries for Face Categorization in Early Deaf Adults: A Study With Chimeric Faces.Marjorie Dole, David Méary & Olivier Pascalis - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  33
    Sensitivity of the observer to transformations of the visual field.Myron L. Braunstein - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (5):683.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  45
    Studies in space orientation. IV. Further experiments on perception of the upright with displaced visual fields.H. A. Witkin & S. E. Asch - 1948 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (6):762.
  47. Color, mental location, and the visual field.David M. Rosenthal - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):85-93.
    Color subjectivism is the view that color properties are mental properties of our visual sensations, perhaps identical with properties of neural states, and that nothing except visual sensations and other mental states exhibits color properties. Color phys- icalism, by contrast, holds that colors are exclusively properties of visible physical objects and processes.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  48.  38
    Effects of inversion of the visual field on human motions.Warren Rhule & Karl U. Smith - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (5):338.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  9
    Symposium: The Visual Field and Perception.D. W. Hamlyn & A. C. Lloyd - 1957 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 31 (1):107 - 144.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  25
    Directed attention and maladaptive "adaptation" to displacement of the visual field.Lance K. Canon - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (3):403.
1 — 50 / 1000