Results for 'surveillance'

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  1. Transparency is Surveillance.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    In her BBC Reith Lectures on Trust, Onora O’Neill offers a short, but biting, criticism of transparency. People think that trust and transparency go together but in reality, says O'Neill, they are deeply opposed. Transparency forces people to conceal their actual reasons for action and invent different ones for public consumption. Transparency forces deception. I work out the details of her argument and worsen her conclusion. I focus on public transparency – that is, transparency to the public over expert domains. (...)
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  2. Just Surveillance? Towards a Normative Theory of Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2014 - Surveillance and Society 12 (1):142-153.
    Despite recent growth in surveillance capabilities there has been little discussion regarding the ethics of surveillance. Much of the research that has been carried out has tended to lack a coherent structure or fails to address key concerns. I argue that the just war tradition should be used as an ethical framework which is applicable to surveillance, providing the questions which should be asked of any surveillance operation. In this manner, when considering whether to employ (...), one should take into account the reason for the surveillance, the authority of the surveillant, whether or not there has been a declaration of intent, whether surveillance is an act of last resort, what is the likelihood of success of the operation and whether surveillance is a proportionate response. Once underway, the methods of surveillance should be proportionate to the occasion and seek to target appropriate people while limiting surveillance of those deemed inappropriate. By drawing on the just war tradition, ethical questions regarding surveillance can draw on a long and considered discourse while gaining a framework which, I argue, raises all the key concerns and misses none. (shrink)
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  3.  60
    Mass Surveillance: A Private Affair?Kevin Macnish - 2020 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 7 (1):9-27.
    Mass surveillance is a more real threat now than at any time in history. Digital communications and automated systems allow for the collection and processing of private information at a scale never seen before. Many argue that mass surveillance entails a significant loss of privacy. Others dispute that there is a loss of privacy if the information is only encountered by automated systems.This paper argues that automated mass surveillance does not involve a significant loss of privacy. Through (...)
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  4. Government Surveillance and Why Defining Privacy Matters in a Post‐Snowden World.Kevin Macnish - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy (2).
    There is a long-running debate as to whether privacy is a matter of control or access. This has become more important following revelations made by Edward Snowden in 2013 regarding the collection of vast swathes of data from the Internet by signals intelligence agencies such as NSA and GCHQ. The nature of this collection is such that if the control account is correct then there has been a significant invasion of people's privacy. If, though, the access account is correct then (...)
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  5. Surveillance Capitalism: A Marx-Inspired Account.Nikhil Venkatesh - 2021 - Philosophy 96 (3):359-385..
    Some of the world's most powerful corporations practise what Shoshana Zuboff (2015; 2019) calls ‘surveillance capitalism’. The core of their business is harvesting, analysing and selling data about the people who use their products. In Zuboff's view, the first corporation to engage in surveillance capitalism was Google, followed by Facebook; recently, firms such as Microsoft and Amazon have pivoted towards such a model. In this paper, I suggest that Karl Marx's analysis of the relations between industrial capitalists and (...)
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  6.  13
    Surveillance, Snowden, and Big Data: Capacities, Consequences, Critique.David Lyon - 2014 - Big Data and Society 1 (2).
    The Snowden revelations about National Security Agency surveillance, starting in 2013, along with the ambiguous complicity of internet companies and the international controversies that followed provide a perfect segue into contemporary conundrums of surveillance and Big Data. Attention has shifted from late C20th information technologies and networks to a C21st focus on data, currently crystallized in “Big Data.” Big Data intensifies certain surveillance trends associated with information technology and networks, and is thus implicated in fresh but fluid (...)
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  7.  32
    Surveillance, Freedom and the Republic.J. Matthew Hoye & Jeffrey Monaghan - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory 17 (3):343-363.
    Arbitrary state and corporate powers are helping to turn the Internet into a global surveillance dragnet. Responses to this novel form of power have been tepid and ineffective. Liberal critiques of surveillance are constrained by their focus on privacy, security and the underlying presupposition that freedom consists only of freedom from interference. By contrast, Foucauldian critiques rejecting liberalism have been well rewarded analytically, but have proven incapable of addressing normative questions regarding the relationship between surveillance and freedom. (...)
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  8.  53
    Surveillance, Privacy and the Ethics of Vehicle Safety Communication Technologies.M. Zimmer - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (4):201-210.
    Recent advances in wireless technologies have led to the development of intelligent, in-vehicle safety applications designed to share information about the actions of nearby vehicles, potential road hazards, and ultimately predict dangerous scenarios or imminent collisions. These vehicle safety communication (VSC) technologies rely on the creation of autonomous, self-organizing, wireless communication networks connecting vehicles with roadside infrastructure and with each other. As the technical standards and communication protocols for VSC technologies are still being developed, certain ethical implications of these new (...)
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  9.  4
    Surveillance, Data and Embodiment: On the Work of Being Watched.Gavin J. D. Smith - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (2):108-139.
    Today’s bodies are akin to ‘walking sensor platforms’. Bodies either host, or are the subjects of, an array of sensing devices that act to convert bodily movements, actions and dynamics into circulative data. This article proposes the notions of ‘disembodied exhaust’ and ‘embodied exhaustion’ to conceptualise processes of bodily sensorisation and datafication. As the material body interfaces with networked sensor technologies and sensing infrastructures, it emits disembodied exhaust: gaseous flows of personal information that establish a representational data-proxy. It is this (...)
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  10.  14
    Pandemic Surveillance and Racialized Subpopulations: Mitigating Vulnerabilities in COVID-19 Apps.Tereza Hendl, Ryoa Chung & Verina Wild - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):829-834.
    Debates about effective responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have emphasized the paramount importance of digital tracing technology in suppressing the disease. So far, discussions about the ethics of this technology have focused on privacy concerns, efficacy, and uptake. However, important issues regarding power imbalances and vulnerability also warrant attention. As demonstrated in other forms of digital surveillance, vulnerable subpopulations pay a higher price for surveillance measures. There is reason to worry that some types of COVID-19 technology might lead (...)
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  11.  43
    Telecare, Surveillance, and the Welfare State.Tom Sorell & Heather Draper - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):36-44.
    In Europe, telecare is the use of remote monitoring technology to enable vulnerable people to live independently in their own homes. The technology includes electronic tags and sensors that transmit information about the user's location and patterns of behavior in the user's home to an external hub, where it can trigger an intervention in an emergency. Telecare users in the United Kingdom sometimes report their unease about being monitored by a ?Big Brother,? and the same kind of electronic tags that (...)
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  12. Indiscriminate Mass Surveillance and the Public Sphere.Titus Stahl - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (1):33-39.
    Recent disclosures suggest that many governments apply indiscriminate mass surveillance technologies that allow them to capture and store a massive amount of communications data belonging to citizens and non-citizens alike. This article argues that traditional liberal critiques of government surveillance that center on an individual right to privacy cannot completely capture the harm that is caused by such surveillance because they ignore its distinctive political dimension. As a complement to standard liberal approaches to privacy, the article develops (...)
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  13.  24
    Surveillance Technologies, Wrongful Criminalisation, and the Presumption of Innocence.Katerina Hadjimatheou - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (1):39-54.
    The potential of surveillance practices to undermine the presumption of innocence is a growing concern amongst critics of surveillance. This paper attempts to assess the impact of surveillance on the presumption of innocence. It defends an account of the presumption of innocence as a protection against wrongful criminalisation against alternatives, and considers both the ways in which surveillance might undermine that protection and the—hitherto overlooked—ways in which it might promote it. It draws on empirical work on (...)
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  14.  21
    Surveillance, Self and Smartphones: Tracking Practices in the Nightlife.Tjerk Timan & Anders Albrechtslund - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (3):853-870.
    This paper is the result of the EMERGING ICT FOR CITIZEN VEILLANCE-workshop organized by the JRC, Ispra, Italy, March 2014. The aim of this paper is to explore how the subject participates in surveillance situations with a particular focus on how users experience everyday tracking technologies and practices. Its theoretical points of departure stem from Surveillance Studies in general and notions of participatory surveillance and empowering exhibitionism :199–215, 2004) in particular. We apply these theoretical notions on smartphones (...)
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  15.  33
    Surveillance Ethics.Kevin Macnish - 2011 - In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    An introduction to the ethical issues of surveillance in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16.  22
    Internet Surveillance After Snowden.Christian Fuchs & Daniel Trottier - 2017 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 15 (4):412-444.
    Purpose This paper aims to present results of a study that focused on the question of how computer and data experts think about Internet and social media surveillance after Edward Snowden’s revelations about the existence of mass-surveillance systems of the Internet such as Prism, XKeyscore and Tempora. Computer and data experts’ views are of particular relevance because they are confronted day by day with questions about the processing of personal data, privacy and data protection. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted (...)
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  17.  18
    The Ethics of Surveillance: An Introduction.Kevin Macnish - 2017 - Routledge.
    _The Ethics of Surveillance: An Introduction_ systematically and comprehensively examines the ethical issues surrounding the concept of surveillance. Addressing important questions such as: Is it ever acceptable to spy on one's allies? To what degree should the state be able to intrude into its citizens' private lives in the name of security? Can corporate espionage ever be justified? What are the ethical issues surrounding big data? How far should a journalist go in pursuing information? Is it reasonable to (...)
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  18.  5
    Surveillance at Workplace and at Home.Riikka Vuokko - 2008 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 6 (1):60-75.
    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to explore how surveillance facilitates new power relationships.Design/methodology/approachThis longitudinal qualitative study is predicated on observations of the home care workers interacting with their managers and clients. The emerging picture was complemented with interviews of the participants. The home care workers were chosen as being crucial in the construction of new everyday relationships, and their interpretations were given most value in presenting how surveillance and monitoring relationships are constructed as embedded mundane practices and (...)
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  19.  6
    Surveillance and Embodiment: Dispositifs of Capture.Gavin J. D. Smith & Martin French - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (2):3-27.
    This article provides an introduction to a special issue of Body & Society that explores the surveillance--embodiment nexus. It accentuates both the prevalence and consequence of bodies being increasingly converted into ‘objects of information’ by surveillance technologies and systems. We begin by regarding the normalcy of body monitoring in contemporary life, illustrating how a plurality of biometric scanners operate to intermediate the physical surfaces and subjective depths of bodies in accordance with various concerns. We focus on everyday experiences (...)
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  20. Liquid Surveillance.[author unknown] - 2013
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  21.  36
    Syndromic Surveillance and Patients as Victims and Vectors.Leslie P. Francis, Margaret P. Battin, Jay Jacobson & Charles Smith - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):187-195.
    Syndromic surveillance uses new ways of gathering data to identify possible disease outbreaks. Because syndromic surveillance can be implemented to detect patterns before diseases are even identified, it poses novel problems for informed consent, patient privacy and confidentiality, and risks of stigmatization. This paper analyzes these ethical issues from the viewpoint of the patient as victim and vector. It concludes by pointing out that the new International Health Regulations fail to take full account of the ethical challenges raised (...)
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  22.  30
    Surveillance in Ubiquitous Network Societies: Normative Conflicts Related to the Consumer in-Store Supermarket Experience in the Context of the Internet of Things.Jenifer Sunrise Winter - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (1):27-41.
    The Internet of Things is an emerging global infrastructure that employs wireless sensors to collect, store, and exchange data. Increasingly, applications for marketing and advertising have been articulated as a means to enhance the consumer shopping experience, in addition to improving efficiency. However, privacy advocates have challenged the mass aggregation of personally-identifiable information in databases and geotracking, the use of location-based services to identify one’s precise location over time. This paper employs the framework of contextual integrity related to privacy developed (...)
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  23.  4
    Surveillance, Privacy and the Making of the Modern Subject: Habeas What Kind of Corpus?Charlotte Epstein - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (2):28-57.
    In this article I consider how our experiences of bodily privacy are changing in the contemporary surveillance society. I use biometric technologies as a lens for tracking the changing relationships between the body and privacy. Adopting a broader genealogical perspective, I retrace the role of the body in the constitution of the modern liberal political subject. I consider two different understandings of the subject, the Foucauldian political subject, and the Lacanian psychoanalytic subject. The psychoanalytic perspective serves to appraise the (...)
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  24. The Concepts of Surveillance and Sousveillance: A Critical Analysis.Frej Klem Thomsen - 2019 - Social Science Information 58 (4):701-713.
    The concept of surveillance has recently been complemented by the concept of sousveillance. Neither term, however, has been rigorously defined, and it is particularly unclear how to understand and delimit sousveillance. This article sketches a generic definition of surveillance and proceeds to explore various ways in which we might define sousveillance, including power differentials, surreptitiousness, control, reciprocity, and moral valence. It argues that for each of these ways of defining it, sousveillance either fails to be distinct from (...) or to provide a generally useful concept. As such, the article concludes that academics should avoid the neologism, and simply clarify what sense of surveillance is at stake when necessary. (shrink)
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  25. Surveillance Cues Enhance Moral Condemnation.Pierrick Bourrat, Nicolas Baumard & Ryan McKay - 2011 - Evolutionary Psychology 9 (2):193-199.
    Humans pay close attention to the reputational consequences of their actions. Recent experiments indicate that even very subtle cues that one is being observed can affect cooperative behaviors. Expressing our opinions about the morality of certain acts is a key means of advertising our cooperative dispositions. Here, we investigated how subtle cues of being watched would affect moral judgments. We predicted that participants exposed to such cues would affirm their endorsement of prevailing moral norms by expressing greater disapproval of moral (...)
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  26. Convict Surveillance and Reform in Theory and Practice.Matthew Allen - 2022 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 21.
    Thanks to Michel Foucault, Jeremy Bentham's panopticon has become the iconic modern prison. But Foucault and most of his readers neglect the fact that a significant proportion of Bentham's panoptical writings were concerned with critically contrasting his ideal prison with the reality of penal transportation to New South Wales. Among his many criticisms, Bentham focussed particular attention on the problem of convict reform, arguing that surveillance was necessary to ensure genuine reformation, and that such surveillance was impossible in (...)
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  27.  16
    Digital Surveillance in a Pandemic Response: What Bioethics Ought to Learn From Indigenous Perspectives.Tereza Hendl & Tiara Roxanne - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (3):305-312.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 3, Page 305-312, March 2022.
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  28.  15
    Surveillance Medicine in the DigitalEra: Lessons From Addiction Treatment.Adrian Carter, Michael Savic & Cynthia Forlini - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):58-60.
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  29.  12
    Surveillance, Governmentality and Moving the Goalposts: The Influence of Ofsted on the Work of Schools in a Post-Panoptic Era.Jane Perryman, Meg Maguire, Annette Braun & Stephen Ball - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (2):145-163.
  30.  59
    Does Surveillance Make Us Morally Better?Emrys Westacott - 2010 - Philosophy Now 79:6-9.
    The article examines how surveillance may on the one hand discourage us from doing wrong while at the same time making us less moral in another sense, since it encourages us to avoid wrongdoing purely out of self-interest.
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  31.  7
    Surveillance and Control of Asymptomatic Carriers of Drug‐Resistant Bacteria.Euzebiusz Jamrozik & Michael J. Selgelid - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):766-775.
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  32.  22
    Surveillance, Security, and AI as Technological Acceptance.Yong Jin Park & S. Mo Jones-Jang - forthcoming - AI and Society.
    Public consumption of artificial intelligence technologies has been rarely investigated from the perspective of data surveillance and security. We show that the technology acceptance model, when properly modified with security and surveillance fears about AI, builds an insight on how individuals begin to use, accept, or evaluate AI and its automated decisions. We conducted two studies, and found positive roles of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness. AI security concern, however, negatively affected PEOU and PU, resulting in (...)
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  33.  23
    Surveillance and the Eye of God.David Lyon - 2014 - Studies in Christian Ethics 27 (1):21-32.
    Surveillance is sometimes spoken of as a God’s eye view of the world. This idea is explored in relation to the ‘objective gaze’ of disengaged reason in the Enlightenment and its technologically-reinforced modes in the twenty-first century. The rise of the eye-centred viewpoint is coincident with the ‘great disembedding’ of individuals from the social. This in turn also prompted the self-disciplines of modernity, which are now key aspects of the power-base of modern institutions. A crucial moment in this shift (...)
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  34.  7
    Surveillance Studies: Perspektiven Eines Forschungsfeldes.Nils Zurawski (ed.) - 2007 - Budrich.
    Am Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts sind die gesellschaftlichen Konsequenzen neuer Formen der Sammlung, Verwendung und Vernetzung von Daten zur Überwachung und Beeinflussung von Menschen und Gruppen noch nicht vollends absehbar. Mit den Surveillance Studies können die Bedingungen und Diskurse von Sicherheit, Überwachung und Kontrolle im Rahmen einer interdisziplinären Forschungsinitiative analysiert werden. Verschiedene Pespektiven werden hier einführend dargestellt. Beiträge aus der Rechtswissenschaft, der Kriminologie, der Geographie, Soziologie und Kunstgeschichte zeigen, welche unterschiedlichen Perspektiven es gibt, um die komplexen und folgenreichen Zusammenhänge (...)
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  35. Living by Algorithm: Smart Surveillance and the Society of Control.Sean Erwin - 2015 - Humanities and Technology Review 34:28-69.
    Foucault’s disciplinary society and his notion of panopticism are often invoked in discussions regarding electronic surveillance. Against this use of Foucault, I argue that contemporary trends in surveillance technology abstract human bodies from their territorial settings, separating them into a series of discrete flows through what Deleuze will term, the surveillant assemblage. The surveillant assemblage and its product, the socially sorted body, aim less at molding, punishing and controlling the body and more at triggering events of in- and (...)
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  36.  5
    Municipal Surveillance Regulation and Algorithmic Accountability.P. M. Krafft, Michael Katell & Meg Young - 2019 - Big Data and Society 6 (2).
    A wave of recent scholarship has warned about the potential for discriminatory harms of algorithmic systems, spurring an interest in algorithmic accountability and regulation. Meanwhile, parallel concerns about surveillance practices have already led to multiple successful regulatory efforts of surveillance technologies—many of which have algorithmic components. Here, we examine municipal surveillance regulation as offering lessons for algorithmic oversight. Taking the 2017 Seattle Surveillance Ordinance as our primary case study and surveying efforts across five other cities, we (...)
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  37. Urban Surveillance: The Hidden Costs of Disneyland.Timothy Stanley - 2006 - International Journal of the Humanities 3 (8):117-24.
    Urban centers are being transformed into consumer tourist playgrounds made possible by dense networks of surveillance. The safety and entertainment however, come at an unseen price. One of the historical roots of surveillance can be connected to the modern information base of tracking individuals for economic and political reasons. Though its antecedents can be traced via Foucault's account of panoptic discipline which walled in society's outcasts for rehabilitation, the following essay explores the shift to the urban panopticism of (...)
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  38.  43
    Too Much Info: Data Surveillance and Reasons to Favor the Control Account of the Right to Privacy.Jakob Thrane Mainz & Rasmus Uhrenfeldt - 2021 - Res Publica 27 (2):287-302.
    In this paper, we argue that there is at least a pro tanto reason to favor the control account of the right to privacy over the access account of the right to privacy. This conclusion is of interest due to its relevance for contemporary discussions related to surveillance policies. We discuss several ways in which the two accounts of the right to privacy can be improved significantly by making minor adjustments to their respective definitions. We then test the improved (...)
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  39.  23
    Trust in Surveillance: A Reply to Etzioni.Glen Whelan - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):15-19.
    Etzioni has recently proposed that the success of Internet enabled commerce is surprising due to what I label the “trust in strangers” problem. In here responding to Etzioni, I argue that the “trust in strangers” problem effectively dissolves once it is recognized that current manifestations of Internet commerce are not associated with high levels of anonymity, but rather, with high levels of surveillance. In doing so, I first outline how data capitalism and security considerations have contributed to Internet (...) being close to ubiquitous. Following this, I differentiate between three types of surveillance—i.e. top-down, bottom-up, networked—that many people who digitally connect rely upon. In concluding, I emphasize my basic argument. Namely, that it is “trust in surveillance”, rather than “trust in strangers”, that supports current manifestations of commerce online. (shrink)
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  40.  29
    Out of Proportion? On Surveillance and the Proportionality Requirement.Kira Vrist Rønn & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (1):181-199.
    In this article, we critically scrutinize the principle of proportionality when used in the context of security and government surveillance. We argue that McMahan’s distinction from just warfare between narrow proportionality and wide proportionality can generally apply to the context of surveillance. We argue that narrow proportionality applies more or less directly to cases in which the surveilled is liable and that the wide proportionality principle applies to cases characterized by ‘collateral intrusion’. We argue, however, that a more (...)
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  41.  12
    Government Surveillance, Privacy, and Legitimacy.Peter Königs - 2022 - Philosophy and Technology 35 (1):1-22.
    The recent decades have seen established liberal democracies expand their surveillance capacities on a massive scale. This article explores what is problematic about government surveillance by democracies. It proceeds by distinguishing three potential sources of concern: the concern that governments diminish citizens’ privacy by collecting their data, the concern that they diminish their privacy by accessing their data, and the concern that the collected data may be used for objectionable purposes. Discussing the meaning and value of privacy, the (...)
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  42.  4
    The Ethics of Surveillance: An Introduction.Kevin Macnish - 2017 - London: Routledge.
    The Ethics of Surveillance: An Introduction systematically and comprehensively examines the ethical issues surrounding the concept of surveillance. Addressing important questions such as: Is it ever acceptable to spy on one's allies? To what degree should the state be able to intrude into its citizens' private lives in the name of security? Can corporate espionage ever be justified? What are the ethical issues surrounding big data? How far should a journalist go in pursuing information? Is it reasonable to (...)
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  43.  14
    Communicable Disease Surveillance Ethics in the Age of Big Data and New Technology.Gwendolyn L. Gilbert, Chris Degeling & Jane Johnson - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (2):173-187.
    Surveillance is essential for communicable disease prevention and control. Traditional notification of demographic and clinical information, about individuals with selected infectious diseases, allows appropriate public health action and is protected by public health and privacy legislation, but is slow and insensitive. Big data–based electronic surveillance, by commercial bodies and government agencies, which draws on a plethora of internet- and mobile device–based sources, has been widely accepted, if not universally welcomed. Similar anonymous digital sources also contain syndromic information, which (...)
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  44.  19
    Surveillance and Digital Health.Nicole Martinez-Martin & Danton Char - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):67-68.
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  45.  28
    Surveillance in Employment: The Case of Teleworking. [REVIEW]N. Ben Fairweather - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):39 - 49.
    This paper looks at various ways teleworking can be linked to surveillance in employment, making recommendations about how telework can be made more acceptable. Technological methods can allow managers to monitor the actions of teleworkers as closely as they could monitor "on site" workers, and in more detail than the same managers could traditionally. Such technological methods of surveillance or monitoring have been associated with low employee morale. For an employer to ensure health and safety may require inspections (...)
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  46.  66
    Rethinking Surveillance and Control. Beyond the 'Security Vs. Privacy' Debate.Elisa Orrù, Maria Grazia Porcedda & Sebastian Weydner-Volkmann (eds.) - 2017 - Baden-Baden: Nomos.
    This book is based on the premise that the trade-off between privacy and security is both unsound and con-ceals important aspects of surveillance and control. Accordingly, the authors analyse the symbiotic relati-onship between liberty and security, and the emptiness of both concepts when considered in isolation. They explore and contextualise different notions of risk, surveillance practices and the value of the rights to pri-vate life and data protection. Thereby, they show that surveillance and control neither necessarily attain (...)
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  47.  29
    Surveillance and Persuasion.Michael Nagenborg - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (1):43-49.
    This paper is as much about surveillance as about persuasive technologies (PTs). With regard to PTs it raises the question about the ethical limits of persuasion. It will be argued that even some forms of self-imposed persuasive soft surveillance technologies may be considered unethical. Therefore, the ethical evaluation of surveillance technologies should not be limited to privacy issues. While it will also be argued that PTs may become instrumental in pre-commitment strategies, it will also be demonstrated that (...)
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  48.  16
    Surveillance Capitalism or Information Republic?Alexander Williams & Paul Raekstad - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
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  49.  1
    Surveillance Following Snowden: A Major Challenge in Spain.Andrew A. Adams, Mario Arias-Oliva, Ana María Lara Palma & Kiyoshi Murata - 2017 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 15 (3):265-282.
    Purpose This study aims to analyse the impacts of Edward Snowden’s revelations in Spain focusing on issues of privacy and state surveillance. This research takes into consideration the Spanish context from a multidimensional perspective: social, cultural, legal and political. Design/methodology/approach The paper reviews the Spanish privacy and state surveillance situation. Responses to a questionnaire were collected from 207 university students studying at Universitat Rovira i Virgili or Burgos University. The quantitative responses to the survey were statistically analysed as (...)
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    P2P Surveillance in the Global Village.Jeremy Weissman - 2019 - Ethics and Information Technology 21 (1):29-47.
    New ubiquitous information and communication technologies, in particular recording-enabled smart devices and social media programs, are giving rise to a profound new power for ordinary people to monitor and track each other on a global scale. Along with this growing capacity to monitor one another is a new capacity to explicitly and publicly judge one another—to rate, rank, comment on, shame and humiliate each other through the net. Drawing upon warnings from Kierkegaard and Mill on the power of public opinion (...)
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