Results for 'social groups'

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  1. What Are Social Groups? Their Metaphysics and How to Classify Them.Brian Epstein - 2019 - Synthese 196 (12):4899-4932.
    This paper presents a systematic approach for analyzing and explaining the nature of social groups. I argue against prominent views that attempt to unify all social groups or to divide them into simple typologies. Instead I argue that social groups are enormously diverse, but show how we can investigate their natures nonetheless. I analyze social groups from a bottom-up perspective, constructing profiles of the metaphysical features of groups of specific kinds. We (...)
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  2. The Metaphysics of Social Groups.Katherine Ritchie - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (5):310-321.
    Social groups, including racial and gender groups and teams and committees, seem to play an important role in our world. This article examines key metaphysical questions regarding groups. I examine answers to the question ‘Do groups exist?’ I argue that worries about puzzles of composition, motivations to accept methodological individualism, and a rejection of Racialism support a negative answer to the question. An affirmative answer is supported by arguments that groups are efficacious, indispensible to (...)
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  3. Social Structures and the Ontology of Social Groups.Katherine Ritchie - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 100 (2):402-424.
    Social groups—like teams, committees, gender groups, and racial groups—play a central role in our lives and in philosophical inquiry. Here I develop and motivate a structuralist ontology of social groups centered on social structures (i.e., networks of relations that are constitutively dependent on social factors). The view delivers a picture that encompasses a diverse range of social groups, while maintaining important metaphysical and normative distinctions between groups of different kinds. (...)
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  4. Social Creationism and Social Groups.Katherine Ritchie - 2018 - In Kendy Hess, Violetta Igneski & Tracy Isaacs (eds.), Collectivity: Ontology, Ethics, and Social Justice. London, UK: pp. 13-34.
    Social groups seem to be entities that are dependent on us. Given their apparent dependence, one might adopt Social Creationism—the thesis that all social groups are social objects created through (some specific types of) thoughts, intentions, agreements, habits, patterns of interaction, and practices. Here I argue that not all social groups come to be in the same way. This is due, in part, to social groups failing to share a uniform (...)
     
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  5. The Ontology of Social Groups.Amie Thomasson - 2019 - Synthese 196 (12):4829-4845.
    Two major questions have dominated work on the metaphysics of social groups: first, Are there any? And second, What are they? I will begin by arguing that the answer to the ontological question is an easy and obvious ‘yes’. We do better to turn our efforts elsewhere, addressing the question: “What are social groups?” One might worry, however, about this question on grounds that the general term ‘social group’ seems like a term of art—not a (...)
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  6. The Identity of Social Groups.Kit Fine - 2020 - Metaphysics 3 (1):81-91.
    I apply the theory of embodiment to various questions concerning the identity of social groups.
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  7.  21
    Discovering Social Groups Via Latent Structure Learning.Tatiana Lau, Hillard T. Pouncy, Samuel J. Gershman & Mina Cikara - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (12):1881-1891.
  8.  59
    Social Groups, Explanation and Ontological Holism.Paul Sheehy - 2003 - Philosophical Papers 32 (2):193-224.
    Abstract Ontological holism is the thesis that social groups are best understood as composite material particulars. At a high level of taxonomic classification groups such as mobs, tribes and nations are the same kind of thing as organisms and artefacts. This holism is opposed by ontological individualism, which maintains that in our formal and folk social scientific discourse we only really refer to individuals and the relations in which they stand. The paper begins from the claim (...)
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    Social Groups as Deleuzian Multiplicities.Paul William Hammond - 2016 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (4):452-467.
    ABSTRACT This article applies Deleuze's metaphysics of multiplicities to groups of people, arguing that organized groups can be said to have mental states in the same sense as individuals. I begin by outlining the genealogy of Deleuze's use of the concept of multiplicity, beginning with Riemann and continuing through Bergson. Deleuze's transformation of these two thinkers' ideas results in a concept of any individual as a conjunction of two types of multiplicity, one relating to its material parts and (...)
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  10.  9
    Selective Memory Retrieval in Social Groups: When Silence is Golden and When It is Not.Magdalena Abel & Karl-Heinz T. Bäuml - 2015 - Cognition 140:40-48.
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  11.  5
    Can Social Groups Be Units of Normative Concern?Chris Lyon - 2022 - Social Theory and Practice 48 (3):553-581.
    In social justice theory, it seems both important, but also potentially normatively and metaphysically suspect, to treat social groups as units of normative concern. This is also the source of much current controversy surrounding social justice politics. I argue that normative individualism is a metaethical clarification, but not necessarily a binding guide for all other normative theory or practice in the way we might assume. Supra-individual social entities can, in fact, be the irreducible subjects of (...)
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    Social Groups as Deleuzian Multiplicities.Paul William Hammond - 2016 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (4):452-467.
    The contemporary social world is one in which, in addition to interacting regularly with a variety of different individual people, we find ourselves more and more often interacting with entities that we more naturally think of as groups. Thus, in addition to my friends, my co-workers, and members of my family, I also have regular meaningful interactions with my bank, my employer, and my government. It seems correct to call corporations and similar entities groups of people rather (...)
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  13.  47
    Reframing Social Groups, Closure, and Stabilization in the Social Construction of Technology.Lee Humphreys - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (2 & 3):231 – 253.
    This paper complicates, extends, and modifies Pinch and Bijker's original social construction of technology, specifically their concepts of relevant social groups, closure, and stabilization, in order to gain insight into long-term processes of how we use and understand technology. First, this paper identifies four broad categories of relevant social groups in the social construction of technology based on stake holdings and compares them according to their activities, resources, and directionality. Second, the paper discusses the (...)
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  14.  2
    Social Group "65 Plus": Pandemic's Ethical Dilemma.М.В Еремина & А.Д Доника - 2022 - Bioethics 15 (1):46-50.
    Background: The conditions of the emergency create an unprecedented, but legitimate approach, when the rights and freedoms of the individual can be limited in the public interest. From the first days of the pandemic, a special social group of the population began to stand out, with the code name "65+". Aim: to give an ethical assessment of the attitude of society to the population group "65+", to show the contradiction between medical and bioethical approaches to the criteria for selecting (...)
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  15. Social Groups and Special Obligations.Kenneth Eric Shockley - 2002 - Dissertation, Washington University
    Members of some social groups hold other members to have special obligations in virtue of their membership. But is this justified? And if so, how? I argue that there is a deep connection between the structure of certain social groups and some special obligations. The issue, then, is to determine how one might have obligations in virtue of one's membership in a particular group. In this dissertation I argue that groups capable of collective action have, (...)
     
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  16.  4
    Social Groups in Associative Democracy.Iris Marion Young - 1992 - Politics and Society 20 (4):529-534.
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  17.  29
    Social Grouping: Perceptual Grouping of Objects by Cooperative but Not Competitive Relationships in Dynamic Chase.Jun Yin, Xiaowei Ding, Jifan Zhou, Rende Shui, Xinyu Li & Mowei Shen - 2013 - Cognition 129 (1):194-204.
  18.  28
    On the Persistence of Social Groups.John D. Greenwood - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):78-81.
    In this short discussion note, I cast doubt upon the common view that social groups persist throughout changes in their membership, by virtue of the maintenance of their structure and/or function. I offer two counterexamples, and consider two possible responses to a natural objection to them, neither of which support the view that it is a metaphysical truth that social groups persist through changes in their membership, or persist by virtue of the maintenance of their structure (...)
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  19.  28
    Mobile Social Group Sizes and Scaling Ratio.Santi Phithakkitnukoon & Ram Dantu - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (1):71-85.
    Social data mining has become an emerging area of research in information and communication technology fields. The scope of social data mining has expanded significantly in the recent years with the advance of telecommunication technologies and the rapidly increasing accessibility of computing resources and mobile devices. People increasingly engage in and rely on phone communications for both personal and business purposes. Hence, mobile phones become an indispensable part of life for many people. In this article, we perform (...) data mining on mobile social networking by presenting a simple but efficient method to define social closeness and social grouping, which are then used to identify social sizes and scaling ratio of close to “8”. We conclude that social mobile network is a subset of the face-to-face social network, and both groupings are not necessary the same, hence the scaling ratios are distinct. Mobile social data mining. (shrink)
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  20. Equality of Whom? Social Groups and Judgments of Injustice.Iris Marion Young - 2001 - Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (1):1–18.
  21. Social Groups and the Computational Conundrums of Delays, Proximity, and Loyalty.Dragos Simandan - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Even though Pietraszewski acknowledges the tentative nature of the theory and the multiple lines of adjacent research needed to flesh it out, he insists that the finite set of primitives he identified is necessary and sufficient for defining social groups in the context of conflict. In this commentary I expose three interrelated conundrums that cast doubt on this simplistic presumption.
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  22.  78
    Social Ontology: Collective Intentionality and Group Agents.Raimo Tuomela - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    This volume presents a systematic philosophical theory related to the collectivism-versus-individualism debate in the social sciences. A weak version of collectivism (the "we-mode" approach) that depends on group-based collective intentionality is developed in the book. The we-mode approach is used to account for collective intention and action, cooperation, group attitudes, social practices and institutions as well as group solidarity.
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  23.  38
    The Reality of Social Groups.Paul Sheehy - 2006 - Ashgate.
    Paul Sheehy will endorse a holist or realist thesis about groups: interrelational holism.
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  24. Social Facts, Social Groups and Social Explanation.John D. Greenwood - 2003 - Noûs 37 (1):93–112.
  25.  10
    Young, Gilbert, and Social Groups.Matthew D. Kuchem - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (4):737-763.
    In this paper I critique the concept of social groups deployed by Iris Marion Young in her well-known theory of the five faces of oppression. I contend that Young’s approach to conceptualizing social groups creates arbitrary and inconsistent categories, essentializes certain groups, and fails to take seriously the complexity of pluralism. I propose that Margaret Gilbert’s work in social metaphysics provides a more philosophically robust account of social groups that serves as a (...)
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    Social Groups of Monkeys, Apes and Men. By Chance Michael and Jolly Clifford. Pp. 224. Price £2.75. - Ethology and Society. Towards an Anthropological View. By Callan Hilary. Pp. 176. Price £2.00. - Ethology. The Biology of Behavior. By Eibl-Eibesfeldt Irenaus. Translated by Klinghammer Erich. Pp. 530. Price $10. [REVIEW]M. P. M. Richards - 1971 - Journal of Biosocial Science 3 (3):346-349.
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  27.  14
    Social Groupings at the Fair of St. Ives.Ellen Wedermeyer - 1970 - Mediaeval Studies 32 (1):27-59.
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    Social Groups Go Places: Edward O. Wilson: The Social Conquest of Earth; W. W. Norton & Co., New York, 2012, 352 Pp., US $27.95, ISBN 978-0-87140-413-8.Vidyanand Nanjundiah - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (2):236-238.
  29.  10
    Social Groups in Modern England. By Henry A. Mess, B.A., Ph.D. (London: Nelson & Sons. 1940. Pp. 168. Price 2s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW]O. de Selincourt - 1941 - Philosophy 16 (61):108-.
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  30.  17
    On the Action of Social Groups.Rolf Gruner - 1976 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 19 (1-4):443 – 454.
    This paper deals with the question of whether and when it is appropriate or inappropriate to say that a social group performs an action. After some remarks on the concept of action three kinds of groups are distinguished, i.e. assemblies, institutions, and classes. It is found that in the first two of these cases predication of action is possible: an assembly can act in that all its members act, or some of them do who are interchangeable with any (...)
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  31.  26
    Speak No Ill of the Dead: The Dead as a Social Group.Tom Kaspers, Jacob LiBrizzi, Duccio Calosi & Yoichi Kobe - 2022 - Synthese 210 (200):1-17.
    In her recent article “The Ontology of Social Groups”, Thomasson (Synthese 196:4829–4845, 2019) argues that social groups can be characterized in terms of the norms that surround them. We show that according to Thomasson’s normativity-based criterion, the dead constitute a social group, since there are widespread and well-defined social norms as to how to treat the dead, such as the norm expressed in the title (“Speak no ill of the dead”). We argue that the (...)
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  32.  55
    Markers of Social Group Membership as Probabilistic Cues in Reasoning Tasks.Gary L. Brase - 2001 - Thinking and Reasoning 7 (4):313 – 346.
    Reasoning about social groups and their associated markers was investigated as a particular case of human reasoning about cue-category relationships. Assertions that reasoning involving cues and associated categories elicits specific probabilistic assumptions are supported by the results of three experiments. This phenomenon remains intact across the use of categorical syllogisms, conditional syllogisms, and the use of social groups that vary in their perceived cohesiveness, or entitativity. Implications are discussed for various theories of reasoning, and additional aspects (...)
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  33.  16
    Equality of Whom? Social Groups and Judgments of Injustice[I Am Grate].Iris Marion Young - 2001 - Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (1):1-18.
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  34.  4
    Social Actors and Social Groups: A Return to Heterogeneity in Social Psychology.Gerard Duveen - 2008 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (4):369-374.
    For the contemporary reader of Psychoanalysis: Its Image and Its Public the analyses of communicative systems in the book provides a challenging occasion for reconsidering current social psychological thinking about the character of social groups. In Moscovici's careful delineation of the communicative systems of diffusion, propagation and propaganda through his content analysis of the French press, one can also see the description of different types of group structured through distinctive social psychological organisations. Moscovici himself suggests that (...)
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  35. Discrimination Revised: Reviewing the Relationship Between Social Groups, Disparate Treatment, and Disparate Impact.Ryan Cook - 2015 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 2 (2):219-244.
    It is usually accepted that whether or not indirect discrimination is a form of immoral discrimination, it appears to be structurally different from direct discrimination. First, it seems that either one involves the agent focusing on different things while making a decision. Second, it seems that the victim’s group membership is relevant to the outcomes of either sort of action in different ways. In virtue of these two facts, it is usually concluded that indirect discrimination is structurally different from direct (...)
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  36.  77
    Rapid Prototyping of Social Group Dynamics in Multiagent Systems.Matthias Rehm & Birgit Endrass - 2009 - AI and Society 24 (1):13-23.
    In this article we present an engineering approach for the integration of social group dynamics in the behavior modeling of multiagent systems. To this end, a toolbox was created that brings together several theories from the social sciences, each focusing on different aspects of group dynamics. Due to its modular approach, the toolbox can either be used as a central control component of an application or it can be employed temporarily to rapidly test the feasibility of the incorporated (...)
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  37.  63
    Non-Ideal Theorizing, Social Groups, and Knowledge of Oppression: A Response.Lisa H. Schwartzman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):177 - 188.
    In responding to Anderson, Tobin, and Mills, I focus on questions about non-ideal theory, normative individualism, and standpoint theory. In particular, I ask whether feminist theorizing can be "liberal" and yet not embody the problematic forms of abstraction and individualism described in "Challenging Liberalism". Ultimately, I call for methods of theorizing that illuminate and challenge oppressive social hierarchies.
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  38. Rectificatory Justice and Social Groups.Rodney C. Roberts - 1997 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    In this dissertation I argue for a theory of rectificatory justice, and apply that theory to circumstances involving two social groups generally thought to have been historically wronged, viz., Native Americans and African Americans. ;Development of a conception of rectificatory justice is begun in Chapter 1 by examining the distinction between distributive justice and rectificatory justice, and by suggesting a theory of compensation. It is argued that the notion of compensation cannot provide an adequate ground for a species (...)
     
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  39. Signals and Cues of Social Groups.Gregory A. Bryant & Constance M. Bainbridge - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    A crucial factor in how we perceive social groups involves the signals and cues emitted by them. Groups signal various properties of their constitution through coordinated behaviors across sensory modalities, influencing receivers' judgments of the group and subsequent interactions. We argue that group communication is a necessary component of a comprehensive computational theory of social groups.
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  40. The More (Social Group Memberships), the Merrier: Is This the Case for Asians?Melissa X.-L. Chang, Jolanda Jetten, Tegan Cruwys, Catherine Haslam & Nurul Praharso - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  41.  14
    Metaphysical Nature of Social Groups: The Significance of Abstract and Concrete for Identity and Persistence of Social Groups.Strahinja Đorđević & Andrea Berber - 2021 - Disputatio 13 (61):121-141.
    In this paper, we consider the relative significance of concrete and abstract features for the identity and persistence of a group. The theoretical background for our analysis is the position according to which groups are realizations of structures. Our main argument is that the relative significance of the abstract features with respect to the significance of concrete features can vary across different types of groups. The argumentation will be backed by introducing the examples in which we show that (...)
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  42. Accommodating Historically Oppressed Social Groups: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation.Bashir Bashir - 2008 - In Will Kymlicka & Bashir Bashir (eds.), The Politics of Reconciliation in Multicultural Societies. Oxford University Press. pp. 48--69.
  43.  17
    Fear Conditioning and Social Groups: Statistics, Not Genetics.Tiago V. Maia - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (7):1232-1251.
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  44.  54
    Sharing Space: The Synchronic Identity of Social Groups.Paul Sheehy - 2006 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (2):131-148.
    Taking ontological realism about social groups as the thesis that groups are composite material objects constituted by their members, this paper considers a challenge to the very possibility that groups be regarded as material entities. Ordinarily we believe that two groups can have synchronic co-extensive memberships—for example, the choir and the rugby team—while preserving their distinctive identity conditions. We also doubt that two objects of the same kind can be in the same place at the (...)
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  45.  61
    Personality, Parasites, Political Attitudes, and Cooperation: A Model of How Infection Prevalence Influences Openness and Social Group Formation.Gordon D. A. Brown, Corey L. Fincher & Lukasz Walasek - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):98-117.
    What is the origin of individual differences in ideology and personality? According to the parasite stress hypothesis, the structure of a society and the values of individuals within it are both influenced by the prevalence of infectious disease within the society's geographical region. High levels of infection threat are associated with more ethnocentric and collectivist social structures and greater adherence to social norms, as well as with socially conservative political ideology and less open but more conscientious personalities. Here (...)
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  46.  12
    How a Social Group Objectified Itself: "Cadres" in France, 1936-45.Luc Boltanski - 1984 - Social Science Information 23 (3):469-491.
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  47.  5
    Toward a Computational Theory of Social Groups: A Finite Set of Cognitive Primitives for Representing Any and All Social Groups in the Context of Conflict.David Pietraszewski - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:1-62.
    We don't yet have adequate theories of what the human mind is representing when it represents a social group. Worse still, many people think we do. This mistaken belief is a consequence of the state of play: Until now, researchers have relied on their own intuitions to link up the concept social group on the one hand and the results of particular studies or models on the other. While necessary, this reliance on intuition has been purchased at a (...)
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  48.  39
    Is the Representation About Social Groups Distinct From That of Other Concepts? A Neuropsychological Study.Piretti Luca, Carnaghi Andrea, Campanella Fabio, Ambron Elisabetta, Somacal Elena, Skrap Miran & Rumiati Raffaella - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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    Two Kinds of Commitments (and Two Kinds of Social Groups).Talbot M. Brewer - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):554–583.
    In this paper, I draw a distinction between two fundamentally different kinds of commitments by highlighting some previously unnoticed subtleties in the pragmatics of "commissive" utterances. I argue that theories which seek to model all commitments on promises, or to ground them all on voluntary consent, can account only for one sort of obligation and not for the other. Since social groups are most perspicuously categorized in terms of the sorts of commitments that bind their members together, this (...)
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  50.  5
    Social Situation, Social Behavior, Social Group.M. Smith - 1945 - Psychological Review 52 (4):224-229.
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