Results for 'sense of social responsibilities'

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  1.  19
    Corporate Social Responsibility in Colombia: Making Sense of Social Strategies.Adam Lindgreen, José-Rodrigo Córdoba, François Maon & José María Mendoza - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S2):229 - 242.
    As corporate social responsibility (CSR) grows increasingly well known and accepted worldwide, organizations attempt to make sense of their social strategies bridge the gap between their current situation and what their stakeholders expect of them. If social strategies represent a potential stepping stone to more sophisticated forms of CSR, then research must investigate the strategies that organizations have adopted. After defining a framework for classifying and analyzing organizations' social strategies, this article considers empirical evidence from (...)
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  2.  31
    Conceptualizing the Dynamics of Social Responsibility: Evidence from a Case Study of Estonia.Ruth Alas & Külliki Tafel - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):371-385.
    During the last decade and a half, Estonia has concentrated predominantly on economic development in its narrowest sense. Currently, the emphasis is gradually moving towards a broader approach, including an increasingly social agenda. The research question here concerns the awareness of corporate social responsibility among Estonian owners and managers. Empirical research in Estonia indicates that there has been a shift towards recognizing the importance of social responsibility, but this primarily concerns the “lower layers” of social (...)
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  3.  70
    Making Sense of Corporate Social Responsibility.Jacqueline Cramer, Jan Jonker & Angela van der Heijden - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):215 - 222.
    This paper provides preliminary insights into the process of sense-making and developing meaning with regard to corporate social responsibility (CSR) within 18 Dutch companies. It is based upon a research project carried out within the framework of the Dutch National Research Programme on CSR. The paper questions how change agents promoting CSR within these companies made sense of the meaning of CSR. How did they use language (and other instruments) to stimulate and underpin the contextual essence of (...)
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  4. Making sense of scientists’ responsibilities at the interface of science and society: Commentary on “six domains of research ethics”.Vivian Weil - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):223-227.
    As Kenneth Pimple points out, scientists’ responsibilities to the larger society have received less attention than ethical issues internal to the practice of science. Yet scientists and specialists who study science have begun to provide analyses of the foundations and scope of scientsts’ responsibilities to society. An account of contributions from Kristen Shrader-Frechette, Melanie Leitner, Ullica Segerstråle, John Ahearne, Helen Longino, and Carl Cranor offers work on scientists’ social responsibilities upon which to build.
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  5.  4
    Making Sense of Corporate Social Responsibility and Work.Ami N. Seivwright & Kerrie L. Unsworth - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  6.  32
    Making sense of corporate social responsibility in international business: Experiences from shell.Esther M. J. Schouten & Joop Remmé - 2006 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 15 (4):365–379.
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  7.  16
    Making sense of corporate social responsibility in international business: experiences from Shell.Esther M. J. Schouten & Joop Remmé - 2006 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (4):365-379.
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  8.  3
    The College Students’ Sense of Responsibility for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.Qing Zhang, Congchong Liu, Zehao Wang & Zimo Yang - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between positive psychological quality and college students’ sense of responsibility for innovation and entrepreneurship from the perspective of positive psychology, explore the cultivation model that can effectively improve college students’ sense of responsibility for innovation and entrepreneurship, and promote their success in entrepreneurship. In this study, a total of 1,500 college students were selected for questionnaire survey. ANOVA was used to analyze the differences of innovation and entrepreneurship (...) in demographic variables; factor analysis models were used to explore the factors that influence college students’ sense of responsibility for innovation and entrepreneurship; and Spearsman correlation and linear regression were used to analyze the relationship between college students’ positive quality and innovation and entrepreneurship. The results showed that the average scores of individual responsibility, team responsibility and social responsibility were 3.290, 3.624 and 3.720, respectively; individual responsibility differed significantly at the grade level; group responsibilities and social responsibilities were significantly different at the grade and gender levels; the linear fitting between benevolence, super-excellence, bravery, restraint, and wisdom with team responsibilities all reached significant levels, among which the wisdom coefficient was the highest; the linear fitting between syngroup, excellence, bravery, modesty and wisdom with social responsibility reached a significant level, among which the wisdom coefficient was the highest; the linear fitting between syngroup, excellence, bravery, modesty and wisdom with personal responsibility reached a significant level, among which the coefficient of excellence was the highest. This indicated that positive psychological qualities such as syngroup, excellence, modesty, benevolence, super-excellence, bravery, restraint, and wisdom were the influencing factors of college students’ sense of responsibility for innovation and entrepreneurship. Among them, the role of wisdom is the most noteworthy in predicting social and group responsibilities, and super-excellent is the most significant predictor for individual responsibility. (shrink)
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  9.  28
    Social Responsibility and Social Security: The Foundation of Caja de Pensiones para la Vejez y de Ahorros.Antonio Argandoña, Carlos M. Moreno & Joan M. Solà - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S3):319 - 332.
    The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is not new. Many entrepreneurs created and developed companies along the time, with a strong sense of ethical and social responsibility. This article presents an example of how CSR was conceived and put into practice when Caja de Pensiones para la Vejez y de Ahorros was created in Barcelona in 1905, following the life and ideas of its founder, Francesc Moragas, a lawyer with a deep commitment for social action (...)
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  10.  2
    No (sociological) excuses for not going green: How do environmental activists make sense of social inequalities and relate to the working class?Hadrien Malier - 2021 - European Journal of Social Theory 24 (3):411-430.
    Some environmental activists occasionally use the argument that poverty is ‘no excuse’ for not going green and denounce discourses putting forward social conditions as unduly exculpatory. Employing participant observation among middle-class activists mobilising to diffuse environmental lifestyles in socially diverse suburbs near Paris, the article explores their relation to the working class and examines the consequences of their endeavours on local class relations. It describes the tension between their goal of mainstreaming environmental reflexivity and the stubborn existence of material (...)
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  11.  13
    Give Me a Chance! Sense of Opportunity Inequality Affects Brain Responses to Outcome Evaluation in a Social Competitive Context: An Event-Related Potential Study.Changquan Long, Qian Sun, Shiwei Jia, Peng Li & Antao Chen - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  12.  3
    Social responsibility and subjective well-being of volunteers for COVID-19: The mediating role of job involvement.Chao Wu, Sizhe Cheng, Yinjuan Zhang, Jiaran Yan, Chunyan He, Zhen Sa, Jing Wu, Yawei Lin, Chunni Heng, Xiangni Su & Hongjuan Lang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    AimOur study aimed to investigate the effect of social responsibility on the subjective well-being of volunteers for COVID-19 and to examine the mediating role of job involvement in this relationship.BackgroundNowadays, more and more people join volunteer service activities. As we all know, volunteer work contributes to society without any return. Volunteers often have a strong sense of social responsibility and reap subjective well-being in their dedication. Although research shows that social responsibility will drive them to participate (...)
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  13.  56
    The Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility: Techniques of Neutralization, Stakeholder Management and Political CSR. [REVIEW]Gary Fooks, Anna Gilmore, Jeff Collin, Chris Holden & Kelley Lee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):283-299.
    Since scholarly interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has primarily focused on the synergies between social and economic performance, our understanding of how (and the conditions under which) companies use CSR to produce policy outcomes that work against public welfare has remained comparatively underdeveloped. In particular, little is known about how corporate decision-makers privately reconcile the conflicts between public and private interests, even though this is likely to be relevant to understanding the limitations of CSR as a means (...)
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  14.  17
    Sense and sensibility: Testing an attention‐based view of organizational responses to social issues.Luciana Carvalho de Mesquita Ferreira - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):443-456.
    According to attention-based theories, to explain organizational attention is to explain organizational behavior. In our study, we test the model of situated attention and firm behavior by examining the effects of attention structures and allocation of attention on organizational outcomes. We hypothesize a positive relationship between attention structures and the allocation of organizational attention that, in turn, has an effect on financial performance. Using a unique data set composed of indicators of social responsibility published by 338 Brazilian organizations between (...)
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  15. Social Responsibility in French Engineering Education: A Historical and Sociological Analysis.Christelle Didier & Antoine Derouet - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1577-1588.
    In France, some institutions seem to call for the engineer’s sense of social responsibility. However, this call is scarcely heard. Still, engineering students have been given the opportunity to gain a general education through courses in literature, law, economics, since the nineteenth century. But, such courses have long been offered only in the top ranked engineering schools. In this paper, we intend to show that the wish to increase engineering students’ social responsibility is an old concern. We (...)
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  16. An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility at Credit Line: A Narrative Approach.Michael Humphreys & Andrew D. Brown - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):403-418.
    This article presents the results of an inductive, interpretive case study. We have adopted a narrative approach to the analysis of organizational processes in order to explore how individuals in a financial institution dealt with relatively novel issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The narratives that we reconstruct, which we label 'idealism and altruism', 'economics and expedience' and 'ignorance and cynicism' illustrate how people in the specific organizational context of a bank ('Credit Line') sought to cope with an attempt (...)
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  17.  11
    Molding the nascent corporate social responsibility agenda in Singapore: of pragmatism, soft regulation, and the economic imperative. [REVIEW]Eugene K. B. Tan - 2013 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):185-204.
    This paper seeks to examine the putative growth of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Singapore. A key impetus for the nascent CSR movement in twenty-first century Singapore is the economic imperative. As a trade-dependent industrializing economy, the economic development drive coupled with the need for international expansion has made it necessary for Singapore businesses to be cognizant of the growing CSR movement in the western, industrialized world. The government supports the CSR endeavour with an instrumental bent, where CSR ideas (...)
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  18. A sense of identity: Prolegomena to a social theory of personal identity.John D. GreenwooD - 1994 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (1):25–46.
    A philosophical account of personal identity - in terms of the maintenance of fundamental beliefs, principles and commitments by spatiotemporally continuous particulars - is sketched, an account which is able to incorporate a social and relational conception of personal identity, and thus serve as the basis for a social psychological theory of personal identity - in terms of the pursuit of identity projects’within social collectives. Some implications of this theory are developed, concerning the relation between identity and (...)
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  19.  10
    Managerial Compensation and Firm Value in the Presence of Socially Responsible Investors.Pierre Chaigneau - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):747-768.
    Shareholders with standard monetary preferences will give a manager incentives to increase firm profits, which can be achieved with equity grants. When shareholders are socially responsible, in the sense that they also value corporate social performance, it is not clear which incentives the manager should receive. Yet, in a standard principal–agent model, we show that the optimal contract is surprisingly simple: it consists in giving equity holdings to the manager. This is notably because the stock price will incorporate (...)
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  20.  17
    Scientists’ Ethical Obligations and Social Responsibility for Nanotechnology Research.Elizabeth A. Corley, Youngjae Kim & Dietram A. Scheufele - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):111-132.
    Scientists’ sense of social responsibility is particularly relevant for emerging technologies. Since a regulatory vacuum can sometimes occur in the early stages of these technologies, individual scientists’ social responsibility might be one of the most significant checks on the risks and negative consequences of this scientific research. In this article, we analyze data from a 2011 mail survey of leading U.S. nanoscientists to explore their perceptions the regarding social and ethical responsibilities for their nanotechnology research. (...)
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  21.  17
    Sense and sensitivity: The roles of organisation and stakeholders in managing corporate social responsibility.Alberic Pater & Karlijn van Lierop - 2006 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 15 (4):339–351.
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  22.  41
    Social Media for Socially Responsible Firms: Analysis of Fortune 500’s Twitter Profiles and their CSR/CSIR Ratings.Kiljae Lee, Won-Yong Oh & Namhyeok Kim - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):791-806.
    The instrumental benefits of firm’s CSR activities are contingent upon the stakeholders’ awareness and favorable attribution. While social media creates an important momentum for firms to cultivate favorable awareness by establishing a powerful framework of stakeholder relationships, the opportunities are not distributed evenly for all firms. In this paper, we investigate the impact of CSR credentials on the effectiveness of social media as a stakeholder-relationship management platform. The analysis of Fortune 500 companies in the Twitter sphere reveals that (...)
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  23.  8
    Sense and sensitivity: the roles of organisation and stakeholders in managing corporate social responsibility.Alberic Pater & Karlijn van Lierop - 2006 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (4):339-351.
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  24.  37
    The Institutionalization of Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting.Archie B. Carroll, Ann K. Buchholtz & Kareem M. Shabana - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (8):1107-1135.
    This article presents a three-stage model of how isomorphic mechanisms have shaped corporate social responsibility reporting practices over time. In the first stage, defensive reporting, companies fail to meet stakeholder expectations due to a deficiency in firm performance. In this stage, the decision to report is driven by coercive isomorphism as firms sense pressure to close the expectational gap. In the second stage, proactive reporting, knowledge of CSR reporting spreads and the practice of CSR reporting becomes normatively sanctioned. (...)
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  25.  16
    Community service, social responsibility and educational performance in rural China's middle schools: evidence from a case study of northwest China.Renfu Luo, Yaojiang Shi, Linxiu Zhang, Chengfang Liu, Li Hongbin, Scott Rozelle & Brian Sharbono - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (2):181-202.
    The main goal of this paper is to analyse the effect of high school scholarships tied to community service on the development of secondary school students in Northwest China. Using data from three rounds of surveys of thousands of students in 298 classes in 75 high schools in Shaanxi province, the paper documents the implementation of the Compassionate Heart Scholars Program and evaluates the effect of the programme on the educational performance, self‐esteem, self‐efficacy and social responsibility of the participants. (...)
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  26.  1
    Women's sense of responsibility for the care of old people:: “But who else is going to do it?”.Jane Aronson - 1992 - Gender and Society 6 (1):8-29.
    Drawing on a qualitative study of women who cared for their elderly mothers, this article explores women's experiences of feeling responsible for elderly relatives. The minimal provision of public services for old people and the relative absence of brothers and husbands from family caregiving emerge as material constraints shaping women's sense of obligation. This is affirmed by ideologies and assumptions about women's association with caring and family ties that permeate subjects' accounts of their situations. Translating their sense of (...)
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  27.  3
    Identity work of corporate social responsibility consultants: Managing discursively the tensions between profit and social responsibility.Luc Brès, Jean-Pascal Gond & Djahanchah P. Ghadiri - 2015 - Discourse and Communication 9 (6):593-624.
    Critical evaluations of the current movement of corporate social responsibility commodification have neglected an important question: How do CSR professionals manage the tensions resulting from the search for both profit and social responsibility? This article addresses this question by analyzing the discourse of CSR consultants with the aim of understanding how they deal with such tensions through identity work. Our findings suggest that people who claim, or who are ascribed, paradoxical professional identities may engage in ‘paradoxical identity mitigation’ (...)
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  28. The changing role of governments in corporate social responsibility: Drivers and responses.Laura Albareda, Josep M. Lozano, Antonio Tencati, Atle Midttun & Francesco Perrini - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (4):347-363.
    The aim of this article is to contribute to understanding the changing role of government in promoting corporate social responsibility (CSR). Over the last decade, governments have joined other stakeholders in assuming a relevant role as drivers of CSR, working together with intergovernmental organizations and recognizing that public policies are key in encouraging a greater sense of CSR. This paper focuses on the analysis of the new strategies adopted by governments in order to promote, and encourage businesses to (...)
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  29. Perceived corporate social responsibility and pro-environmental behaviour: Insights from business schools of Peshawar, Pakistan.Sana Tariq, Mohammad Sohail Yunis, Shandana Shoaib, Fahad Abdullah & Shah Wali Khan - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Corporate Social Responsibility and environmental sustainability have become urgent concerns for contemporary businesses. This study focuses on the interplay between corporate social responsibility perceptions and pro-environmental behaviour in response to experts’ call for research on the micro-foundations of corporate social responsibility. In addition, it reveals the mechanism underpinning how perceived CSR shapes pro-environmental behaviour in an understudied developing context. Empirically, a qualitative multiple-case research design is utilised by selecting three business schools from Peshawar, Pakistan. Fourteen semi-structured interviews (...)
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  30.  19
    Antecedents of Environmentally and Socially Responsible Sustainable Consumer Behavior.Maja Hosta & Vesna Zabkar - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (2):273-293.
    Responsible sustainable consumer behavior involves a complex pattern of environmental and social issues, in line with the view of sustainability as a construct with both environmental and social pillar. So far, environmental dimension was far more researched than social dimension. In this article, we investigate the antecedents of both environmentally and socially RSCB and willingness to behave in environmentally/socially responsible way. We include measures of concern, perceived consumer control/effectiveness, personal/social norms and ethical ideologies/obligation to better explain (...)
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  31.  3
    Manifestations of corporate social responsibility as sensemaking and sensegiving in a hydrocarbon industry.Nathan Andrews - 2021 - Business and Society Review 126 (2):211-234.
    There is a large body of literature that examines different dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Africa, with many focusing on the false promises of these corporate initiatives. Contrary to simplistic claims of CSR being merely window-dressing, however, this paper reveals that although several rhetorical proclamations underpin the idea, such statements are often given instrumental meaning through diverse mechanisms (e.g., interpretation of cues toward the proactive (re)construction of identity, (inter)subjective discourses on social legitimacy, and acts of “issue (...)
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  32.  4
    The role of Corporate Social Responsibility in Organisational Identity Communication, Co-Creation and Orientation.Mohamed Karim Sorour, Mark Boadu & Teerooven Soobaroyen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):89-108.
    Corporate social responsibility research has mainly focused on understanding the antecedents and outcomes of CSR adoption. Yet, little is known about the organisational process of ‘CSR engagement’ and how this would affect organisational identity. We mobilise Basu and Palazzo’s cognitive and linguistic notions of sense-making and Brickson’s organisational identity orientation to frame how rural community banks in Ghana engage with CSR. Drawing from semi-structured interviews with RCB directors, managers and other stakeholders, we conceive of the CSR engagement process (...)
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  33.  10
    Gap : Social Responsibility Campaign or Window Dressing?Michelle Amazeen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):167-182.
    This study interrogates the Gap campaign from a political economic perspective to determine whether it goes beyond merely touting the virtuous line of social responsibility. Critics cite the irony of capitalist-based solutions that perpetuate the inequities they are trying to address. Others suggest the aid generated is problematic in and of itself because it keeps Africa from becoming self-sufficient. This research contends the purpose of the Gap’s participation is genuine, going beyond window dressing and the surface level benefit of (...)
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  34.  27
    Social responsibility in the marketplace: asymmetric information in food labelling.Richard Pearce - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (1):26-36.
    This paper takes as its focus the adoption by the Co‐operative Wholesale Society of what appears to be a socially responsible stance on food labelling practice and policy through the publication of a public report and a proposed code of practice.The central issue in the debate surrounding labelling is the question of ‘asymmetric information’. In order to function, markets need perfect information. The existence of asymmetric information gives rise to ‘market failure’ which prevents the ‘free market’ from functioning according to (...)
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  35. Making sense of collective moral obligations: A comparison of existing approaches.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2018 - In Kendy Hess, Violetta Igneski & Tracy Lynn Isaacs (eds.), Collectivity: Ontology, Ethics, and Social Justice. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 109-132.
    We can often achieve together what we could not have achieved on our own. Many times these outcomes and actions will be morally valuable; sometimes they may be of substantial moral value. However, when can we be under an obligation to perform some morally valuable action together with others, or to jointly produce a morally significant outcome? Can there be collective moral obligations, and if so, under what circumstances do we acquire them? These are questions to which philosophers are increasingly (...)
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  36.  13
    Educating for Empathy and Action: The Impact of Study Abroad on Individual Social Responsibility and Global Citizenship.Meredith Church & Martin Meznar - 2012 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:298-308.
    Global citizenship is a positive outcome often associated with participation in study abroad. One essential building block of global citizenship is a sense of empathy toward those of other cultures. This paper proposes a study of variables that may increase intercultural empathy and global citizenship due to a study abroad experience. Proposed variables contributing to intercultural empathy include integration with the host culture, program duration, the economic and cultural distance of the host country, and the incorporation of guided reflection (...)
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  37. Making Sense of the Sense of Duty: A Humean Theory of Moral Motivation.Lorraine Besser-Jones - 2003 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Utilitarian and deontological moral theories are often accused of failing to develop a convincing account of an agent's moral psychology, and so failing to provide an adequate theory of moral motivation that sustains their conception of morality as involving generally overriding moral duties. As a result of this apparent conflict between an agent's psychology and the demands of morality, many suggest making dramatic revisions to our conception of morality. I argue here that a more promising response is to examine where (...)
     
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  38.  51
    The role of solidarity in social responsibility for health.Massimo Reichlin - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):365-370.
    The Article focuses on the concept of social solidarity, as it is used in the Report of the International Bioethics Committee On Social Responsibility and Health. It is argued that solidarity plays a major role in supporting the whole framework of social responsibility, as presented by the IBC. Moreover, solidarity is not limited to members of particular groups, but potentially extended to all human beings on the basis of their inherent dignity; this sense of human solidarity (...)
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  39.  66
    On the relationship of hope and gratitude to corporate social responsibility.Lynne M. Andersson, Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):401-409.
    A longitudinal study of 308 white -collar U.S. employees revealed that feelings of hope and gratitude increase concern for corporate social responsibility. In particular, employees with stronger hope and gratitude were found to have a greater sense of responsibility toward employee and societal issues; interestingly, employee hope and gratitude did not affect sense of responsibility toward economic and safety/quality issues. These findings offer an extension of research by Giacalone, Paul, and Jurkiewicz.
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  40.  32
    Coming Out of the Investors’ Cave?: Making Sense of Responsible Investing in Europe in the New Millennium.Harry Hummels - 2012 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (2):331-348.
    Responsible Investing is on the rise. In ten years time, what started as an ideologically motivated practice by often religiously inspired investors has become amainstream activity. Through the Principles for Responsible Investing a large group of institutional investors representing tens of trillions of dollars have become involved in and transformed the practice. A major change refers to a change in definition and the disappearance of ethics, which was replaced by a focus on governance. However, society is not taking unethical investments (...)
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  41.  18
    Gap (RED): Social Responsibility Campaign or Window Dressing? [REVIEW]Michelle Amazeen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):167 - 182.
    This study interrogates the Gap (RED) campaign from a political economic perspective to determine whether it goes beyond merely touting the virtuous line of social responsibility. Critics cite the irony of capitalist-based solutions that perpetuate the inequities they are trying to address. Others suggest the aid generated is problematic in and of itself because it keeps Africa from becoming self-sufficient. This research contends the purpose of the Gap's participation is genuine, going beyond window dressing and the surface level benefit (...)
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  42.  55
    Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility in Corporate Governance: A Stakeholder Systems Approach.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):77-86.
    Current research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) illustrates the growing sense of discord surrounding the ‘business of doing good’ (Dobers and Springett, Corp Soc Responsib Environ Manage 17(2):63–69, 2010). Central to these concerns is that CSR risks becoming an over-simplified and peripheral part of corporate strategy. Rather than transforming the dominant corporate discourse, it is argued that CSR and related concepts are limited to “emancipatory rhetoric…defined by narrow business interests and serve to curtail interests of external stakeholders.” (Banerjee, (...)
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  43. Philosophic Communities of Inquiry: The Search for and Finding of Meaning as the Basis for Developing a Sense of Responsibility.Arie Kizel - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):87 - 103.
    The attempt to define meaning arouses numerous questions, such as whether life can be meaningful without actions devoted to a central purpose or whether the latter guarantee a meaningful life. Communities of inquiry are relevant in this context because they create relationships within and between people and the environment. The more they address relations—social, cognitive, emotional, etc.—that tie-in with the children’s world even if not in a concrete fashion, the more they enable young people to search for and find (...)
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  44.  8
    On having a sense of responsibility.Eugene A. Troxell - 1994 - Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):5-28.
  45.  21
    Setting Boundaries for Corporate Social Responsibility: Firm–NGO Relationship as Discursive Legitimation Struggle. [REVIEW]Maria Joutsenvirta - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):57-75.
    This article extends our understanding of the firm–nongovernmental organization relationship by emphasizing the role of language in shaping organizational behavior. It focuses on discursive and rhetorical activity through which firms and NGOs jointly – and not always consciously – define boundaries for socially acceptable corporate behavior. It explores the discursive legitimation struggles of a leading Finnish forest industry company StoraEnso and Greenpeace during 1985–2001 and examines how these struggles participated in the definition and institutionalization of corporate social responsibility. I (...)
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  46.  60
    A Neo-Kantian Foundation of Corporate Social Responsibility.Wim Dubbink & Luc van Liedekerke - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):117 - 136.
    'Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is conceptualized in many ways. We argue that one cannot be indifferent about the issue of its conceptualization. In terms of methodology, our position is that any conceptual discussion must embed CSR in political theory. With regard to substance, we link up with the discussion on whether CSR must be defined on the basis of a tripartite or a quadripartite division of business responsibilities. We share A. B. Carroll's intuition that a quadripartite division is (...)
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  47. Aesthetic sense and social cognition: a story from the Early Stone Age.Gregory Currie & Xuanqi Zhu - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Human aesthetic practices show a sensitivity to the ways that the appearance of an artefact manifests skills and other qualities of the maker. We investigate a possible origin for this kind of sensibility, locating it in the need for co-ordination of skill-transmission in the Acheulean stone tool culture. We argue that our narrative supports the idea that Acheulian agents were aesthetic agents. In line with this we offer what may seem an absurd comparison: between the Acheulian and the Quattrocento. In (...)
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  48.  8
    The Moral Complexity of Agriculture: A Challenge for Corporate Social Responsibility.Evelien M. de Olde & Vladislav Valentinov - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (3):413-430.
    Over the past decades, the modernization of agriculture in the Western world has contributed not only to a rapid increase in food production but also to environmental and societal concerns over issues such as greenhouse gas emissions, soil quality and biodiversity loss. Many of these concerns, for example those related to animal welfare or labor conditions, are stuck in controversies and apparently deadlocked debates. As a result we observe a paradox in which a wide range of corporate social responsibility (...)
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  49.  7
    Science and social responsibility.Carl F. Butts - 1948 - Philosophy of Science 15 (2):100-103.
    Today a failure of the physical sciences accompanies a failure of the social sciences; and the failure of both consists in part in this: in the lack of a fully-developed and implemented sense of social responsibility. Both have denied guilt for their shortcomings in this respect: advancing rationalizations to the effect that social reform is not the task of science; that objectivity suffers if such motivations are allowed to become involved; and that science makes its most (...)
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  50.  68
    Construction of owner–manager identity in corporate social responsibility discourse.Merja Lähdesmäki - 2012 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 21 (2):168-182.
    This article examines the different discursive resources on which small business owner–managers draw when understanding their sense of self in relation to corporate social responsibility. In the small business context, identity provides a justifiable framework to study corporate social responsibility, as decisions regarding socially responsible activities are mainly taken by managers and stem from their sense of who they are in the world. On the basis of 25 thematic interviews with owner–managers, two broad discursive resources were (...)
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