Results for 'selfish gene'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  33
    The Theory of the Selfish Gene Applied to the Human Population.Richard Startup - 2021 - Advances in Anthropology 11 (3):179-200.
    In a study drawing from both evolutionary biology and the social sciences, evidence and argument is assembled in support of the comprehensive appli- cation of selfish gene theory to the human population. With a focus on genes giving rise to characteristically-human cooperation (“cooperative genes”) in- volving language and theory of mind, one may situate a whole range of pat- terned behaviour—including celibacy and even slavery—otherwise seeming to present insuperable difficulties. Crucially, the behaviour which tends to propa- gate the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  55
    Selfish Genes and Social Darwinism.Mary Midgley - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):365.
    Exchanging views in Philosophy with a two-year time-lag is getting rather like conversation with the Andromeda Nebula. I am distressed that my reply to Messrs Mackie and Dawkins, explaining what made me write so crossly about The Selfish Gene , has been so long delayed. Mr Mackie's sudden death in December 1981 adds a further dimension to this distress.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  38
    The Selfish Gene Revisited: Reconciliation of Williams-–Dawkins and Conventional Definitions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):246-255.
    Sightings of the revolutionary comet that appeared in the skies of evolutionary biology in 1976—the selfish gene—date back to the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became generally recognized that genes were located on chromosomes and compete with each other in a manner consistent with the later appellation “selfish.” Chromosomes were seen as disruptable by the apparently random “cut and paste” process known as recombination. However, each gene was only a small part of its chromosome. On (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  26
    The Selfish Gene Revisited: Reconciliation of Williams-Dawkins and Conventional Definitions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):246-255.
    Sightings of the revolutionary comet that appeared in the skies of evolutionary biology in 1976—the selfish gene—date back to the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became generally recognized that genes were located on chromosomes and compete with each other in a manner consistent with the later appellation “selfish.” Chromosomes were seen as disruptable by the apparently random “cut and paste” process known as recombination. However, each gene was only a small part of its chromosome. On (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. The Selfish Gene as a Philosophical Essay.Daniel Dennett - unknown
    One critic complained that my argument was ‘philosophical’, as though that was sufficient condemnation. Philosophical or not, the fact is that neither he nor anybody else has found any flaw in what I said. And ‘in principle’ arguments such as mine, far from being irrelevant to the real world, can be more powerful than arguments based on particular factual research. My reasoning, if it is correct, tells us something important about life everywhere in the universe. Laboratory and field research can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Selfish Genes and Christian Ethics.Neil Messer - 2009 - Ars Disputandi 9:1566-5399.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  54
    How Selfish Genes Shape Moral Passions.Randolph M. Nesse - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    Genes are ‘selfish’ in that they make organisms whose behaviours are shaped, necessarily, to benefit their genes. But altruism and selfishness as we usually think of them have little to do with ‘evolutionary altruism’ and ‘evolutionary selfishness', and the use of these phrases has given rise to much confusion. The most pernicious is the false conclusion that individual altruism is impossible unless it has been shaped by group selection. In fact, human altruism and morality are shaped by genes because (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  67
    In Defence of Selfish Genes.Richard Dawkins - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (218):556.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  9.  4
    Selfish Genes and Ingroup Altruism.Allan Gibbard - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):706-707.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  42
    28. The Selfish Gene.Richard Dawkins - 2016 - In Bernard Williams (ed.), Essays and Reviews: 1959-2002. Princeton University Press. pp. 140-142.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Book Review: Neil Messer, Selfish Genes and Christian Ethics: Theological and Ethical Reflections on Evolutionary Biology (London: SCM Press, 2007). Viii + 280 Pp. £19.99 (Pb), ISBN 978—0—334—02996—0. [REVIEW]Christopher Southgate - 2008 - Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (1):142-145.
  12. Deficiencies in the" Selfish Genes" View of Ethics: A Critique of the Evolutionary Account.Miguel Endara - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (3):517-530.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Designoids, Extended Phenotypes, and Selfish Genes.Matteo Mameli - manuscript
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  14
    Deficiencies in the “Selfish Genes” View of Ethics.Miguel Miguel Endara - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (3):517-530.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  16
    The Story of The Selfish Gene.Michael Rodgers - 2017 - Logos 28 (2):44-55.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  19
    Mutual Aid and Selfish Genes.Janna L. Thompson - 1984 - Metaphilosophy 15 (3-4):270-281.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. From Gaia to Selfish Genes.Connie Barlow & Jan Sapp - 1994 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  1
    From Darwin to Derrida: Selfish Genes, Social Selves, and the Meanings of Life.Stanley Shostak - forthcoming - The European Legacy:1-4.
    David Haig’s From Darwin to Derrida scrutinizes a wide range of historical and contemporary issues embedded in the theory and practice of genetics—from genes to multilevel selection, from prokaryot...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  3
    The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene.Mary Midgley - 2010 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  38
    Religion's Role in Human Evolution: The Missing Link Between Ape-Man's Selfish Genes and Civilized Altruism.Ralph Wendell Burhoe - 1979 - Zygon 14 (2):135-162.
  21.  53
    The Gregarious Metaphor Of The Selfish Gene.Colin Grant - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (4):431.
    Science establishes facts; the arts create imaginary possibilities; theology speculates. Although this characterization might receive wide endorsement, highly creative and literary developments in contemporary science suggest otherwise. The intriguing gene's-eye view of life promoted by sociobiology, and especially in Richard Dawkins' ‘biography’ of the selfish gene, represents a highly literate and imaginative account of reality that not only shatters the science/arts stereotype but even suggests that ultimately science involves views of reality of theological proportions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  21
    You Can Take the Ethics Out of Altruism but You Can't Take the Altruism Out of EthicsThe Selfish Gene[REVIEW]Gunther S. Stent & Richard Dawkins - 1977 - Hastings Center Report 7 (6):33.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. The Selfish Environment Meets the Selfish Gene: Coevolution and Inheritance of RNA and DNA Pools.Anthony P. Monaco - 2022 - Bioessays 44 (2):2100239.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  21
    The Selfish Goal Meets the Selfish Gene.Steven L. Neuberg & Mark Schaller - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):153-154.
  25.  19
    Mary Midgley , The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene . Reviewed By.Jeffery Nicholas - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (3):205-210.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  16
    The Validity of Dawkins's Selfish Gene Theory and the Role of the Unconscious in Decision Making.Tobias A. Mattei - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):148-149.
  27.  46
    I. The Loving Parent Meets the Selfish Gene.J. Patrick Gray & Linda Wolfe - 1980 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):233 – 242.
    In a recent Inquiry article Louis Pascal argues that the problem of massive starvation in the modern world is the result of a genetically-based human propensity to produce as many offspring as possible, regardless of ecological conditions. In this paper biological and anthropological objections to Pascal's thesis are discussed as well as the conclusions he draws from it. It is suggested that natural selection has produced humans who are flexible in their reproductive behavior in order to cope with rapidly changing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  33
    The Biology of Human Action. By Vernon Reynolds. Pp. Xv + 269. Price £6.20 ; £2.95 . - Growing Points in Ethology. Edited by P. P. G. Bateson and R. A. Hinde. Pp. Viii + 548. Price £10.00. - The Selfish Gene. By Richard Dawkins. Pp. Xi + 224. Price £2.95. [REVIEW]M. P. M. Richards - 1977 - Journal of Biosocial Science 9 (3):373-377.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  11
    Publishing and the Advancement of Science: From Selfish Genes to Galileo’s Finger Michael Rodgers London: Imperial College Press, 2013 ISBN 978-1783263714 194 Pages, Hb, Pb, and Ebook Price £19.00. [REVIEW]Peter Evans - 2015 - Logos 26 (3):63-64.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  4
    The Bridge to Humanity: How Affect Hunger Trumps the Selfish Gene. Walter Goldschmidt. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Xii + 164 Pp. [REVIEW]Benjamin N. Colby - 2010 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (1):1-4.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  2
    The Bridge to Humanity: How Affect Hunger Trumps the Selfish Gene. Walter Goldschmidt. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Xii + 164 Pp. [REVIEW]Benjamin N. Colby - 2010 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (1):1-4.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  1
    David Haig, "From Darwin to Derrida: Selfish Genes, Social Selves, and the Meanings of Life.".Evan Clarke - 2021 - Philosophy in Review 41 (3):188-190.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Why Genes Are Not Selfish and People Are Nice: A Challenge to the Dangerous Ideas That Dominate Our Lives.Colin Tudge - 2013 - Floris Books.
    A remarkable and thought-provoking book challenging Darwinian assumptions and a message of hope for those who believe we're doomed to self-destruction.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Yes, Genes Can Be Selfish.Mark Henderson - unknown
    To mark the 30th anniversary of Richard Dawkins’s book, OUP is to issue a collection of essays about his work. Here, professor of psychology at Harvard University, wonders if Dawkins’s big idea has not gone far enough..
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  8
    Are Genes "Selfish"?Richard Dawkins & Gunther Stent - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (4):4.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  38
    The Genial Gene: Deconstructing Darwinian Selfishness. [REVIEW]Barry Allen - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (3):559-559.
    Darwin had a hypothesis about descent with modification, and a Spencerian view of the evolution as selfish conflict. Biology remains marked by the dualism today. Many, inside the discipline and out, suppose that taking an evolutionary perspective just is to seek the secret selfishness that “explains” a successful form of life. Nowhere is this view of evolution more entrenched than in the theory specialists call Sexual Selection, a theory on the evolution of everything that differentiates the sexes. Darwin thought (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Beyond the “Selfish Mitochondrion” Theory of Uniparental Inheritance.Arunas Radzvilavicius - manuscript
    Selfishgene theories have offered invaluable insight into eukaryotic genome evolution, but they can also be misleading. The “selfish mitochondrion” hypothesis, developed in the 90s explained uniparental organelle inheritance as a mechanism of conflict resolution, improving cooperation between genetically distinct compartments of the cell. But modern population genetic models provided a more general explanation for uniparental inheritance based on mutational variance redistribution, modulating the efficiency of both purifying and adaptive selection. Nevertheless, “selfish” conflict theories still dominate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  56
    The Genial Gene: Deconstructing Darwinian Selfishness. By Joan Roughgarden.Charles F. Smith - 2010 - Zygon 45 (1):284-285.
  39. Gene-Juggling.Mary Midgley - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (210):439.
    Genes cannot be selfish or unselfish, any more than atoms can be jealous, elephants abstract or biscuits teleological. This should not need mentioning, but Richard Dawkins's book The Selfish Gene has succeeded in confusing a number of people about it, including Mr J. L. Mackie. What Mackie welcomes in Dawkins is a new, biological-looking kind of support for philosophic egoism. If this support came from Dawkins's producing important new facts, or good new interpretations of old facts, about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  40. Sex and Sensibility: The Role of Social Selection: Roughgarden, Joan: The Genial Gene: Deconstructing Darwinian Selfishness. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009, Ix+261pp, $40.00 HB, $18.95 PB.Erika L. Milam, Roberta L. Millstein, Angela Potochnik & Joan E. Roughgarden - 2011 - Metascience 20 (2):253-277.
    Sex and sensibility: The role of social selection Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9464-6 Authors Erika L. Milam, Department of History, University of Maryland, 2115 Francis Scott Key Hall, College Park, MD 20742, USA Roberta L. Millstein, Department of Philosophy, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA Angela Potochnik, Department of Philosophy, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210374, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA Joan E. Roughgarden, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA Journal Metascience Online (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  41. Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History.Holmes Rolston - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There is also (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  42.  50
    Genes: A Philosophical Inquiry.Gordon Graham - 2002 - Routledge.
    'It's all in the genes'. Is this true, and if so, _what_ is all in the genes? _Genes: A Philosophical Inquiry_ is a crystal clear and highly informative guide to a debate none of us can afford to ignore. Beginning with a much-needed overview of the relationship between science and technology, Gordon Graham lucidly explains and assesses the most important and controversial aspects of the genes debate: Darwinian theory and its critics, the idea of the 'selfish' gene, evolutionary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  15
    Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History.Holmes Rolston, Iii - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There is also (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  5
    The Selfish Meme: A Critical Reassessment.Kate Distin - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Culture is a unique and fascinating aspect of the human species. How did it emerge and how does it develop? Richard Dawkins suggested culture evolves and that memes are cultural replicators, subject to variation and selection in the same way as genes are in the biological world. Thus human culture is the product of a mindless evolutionary algorithm. Does this imply, as some have argued, that we are mere meme machines and that the conscious self is an illusion? This highly (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  45. Does Altruism Exist?: Culture, Genes, and the Welfare of Others.David Sloan Wilson - 2015 - Yale University Press.
    _A powerful treatise that demonstrates the existence of altruism in nature, with surprising implications for human society_ Does altruism exist? Or is human nature entirely selfish? In this eloquent and accessible book, famed biologist David Sloan Wilson provides new answers to this age-old question based on the latest developments in evolutionary science. From an evolutionary viewpoint, Wilson argues, altruism is inextricably linked to the functional organization of groups. “Groups that work” undeniably exist in nature and human society, although special (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46.  5
    Does Altruism Exist?: Culture, Genes, and the Welfare of Others.David Sloan Wilson - 2015 - Yale University Press.
    _A powerful treatise that demonstrates the existence of altruism in nature, with surprising implications for human society_ Does altruism exist? Or is human nature entirely selfish? In this eloquent and accessible book, famed biologist David Sloan Wilson provides new answers to this age-old question based on the latest developments in evolutionary science. From an evolutionary viewpoint, Wilson argues, altruism is inextricably linked to the functional organization of groups. “Groups that work” undeniably exist in nature and human society, although special (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47. Evolution, Genes, and Behavior.Ian Tattersall - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):657-666.
  48.  29
    What is the Gene Trying to Do?Warren J. Ewens - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):155-176.
    The aim of this paper is to offer a new biological interpretation of Fisher’s ‘Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection’ and from this to consider optimality properties of gene frequency changes. These matters are of continuing interest to biologists and philosophers alike. In particular, the extent to which biological evolution can be calculated from the ‘gene’s-eye’ point of view is also discussed. In this sense, the paper bears indirectly on the concepts of the unit of selection and of the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  49.  27
    The Selfish Meme & the Selfless ATMA.Sangeetha Menon - 2002 - Sophia 41 (1):83-88.
    Abstract The word ‘meme’ was first used by Richard Dawkins (Dawkins, 1976)1 in the sense of a replicator to introduce the idea of cultural transmission through the process of imitation, just as genes are responsible for the evolution of organisms. Following Dawkins several writers came forth to have a closer look at ‘meme’. The consensus was that this was a fascinating way of explaining cultural evolution and transmission; that meme is the basic unit of (cultural) information whose existence influences events (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  11
    Selfish, Altruistic, or Groupish? Natural Selection and Human Moralities.Ian Vine - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    Sober and Wilson's enthusiasm for a multi-level perspective in evolutionary biology leads to conceptualizations which appropriate all sources of bio-altruistic traits as products of ‘group’ selection. The key biological issue is whether genes enhancing one sub-population's viability in competition with others can thrive, despite inducing some members to lose fitness in intra-group terms. The case for such selection amongst primates remains unproven. Flexible social loyalties required prior evolution of subjective self-definition and self-identification with others. But normative readiness for truly group-serving (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000