Results for 'reproduction'

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  1.  13
    Women and New Reproductive.New Reproductive - 1992 - In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. pp. 695--167.
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  2.  70
    Reproduction in Education, Society and Culture.Pierre Bourdieu, Professor Pierre Bourdieu & Jean-Claude Passeron - 1990 - SAGE.
    The way in which the ruling ideas of a social system are related to structures of class, production and power, and how these are legitimated and perpetuated, is fundamental to the sociological project. In this second edition of this classic text, which includes a new introduction by Pierre Bourdieu, the authors develop an analysis of education (in its broadest sense, encompassing more than the process of formal education). They show how education carries an essentially arbitrary cultural scheme which is actually, (...)
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  3. Reproductive Freedom, Self-Regulation, and the Government of Impairment in Utero.Shelley Tremain - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):35-53.
    : This article critically examines the constitution of impairment in prenatal testing and screening practices and various discourses that surround these technologies. While technologies to test and screen prenatally are claimed to enhance women's capacity to be self-determining, make informed reproductive choices, and, in effect, wrest control of their bodies from a patriarchal medical establishment, I contend that this emerging relation between pregnant women and reproductive technologies is a new strategy of a form of power that began to emerge in (...)
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  4.  29
    Prussian Reproduction, Proper Function and Infertile Marriages.David B. Hershenov - 2015 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 63 (3):129-141.
    Alex Pruss argues that romantic love is a basic form of human love that is properly fulfilled in sex oriented towards reproduction. As a result, homoerotic sexual activity cannot obtain the proper consummation and therefore involves misunderstanding the other person’s nature and the possibility of union with them. Although same-sex sexual activity may feel like a consummation of romantic love, it is wrong to generate such a false experience in oneself or another. Presented is an apparent dilemma for Pruss’s (...)
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  5. Can Reproductive Genetic Manipulation Save Lives?G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (3):381-386.
    It has recently been argued that reproductive genetic manipulation technologies like mitochondrial replacement and germline CRISPR modifications cannot be said to save anyone’s life because, counterfactually, no one would suffer more or die sooner absent the intervention. The present article argues that, on the contrary, reproductive genetic manipulations may be life-saving (and, from this, have therapeutic value) under an appropriate population health perspective. As such, popular reports of reproductive genetic manipulations potentially saving lives or preventing disease are not necessarily mistaken, (...)
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  6.  17
    Intending Reproduction as One’s Primary Aim: Alexander Pruss on ‘Trying for a Baby’.Helen Watt - 2015 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 63 (3):143-154.
    May a couple have the aim of conceiving as their primary purpose in having marital relations? In this paper, I argue against the view of Alexander Pruss that it is wrong to do this since it treats human beings as fungible in their creation when their unique features are not known to their parents. I argue that Pruss cannot separate seeking reproduction as part of a marital vocation from seeking the unknown, unspecified child who is part of what makes (...)
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  7.  53
    Reproductive Tourism and the Quest for Global Gender Justice.Anne Donchin - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (7):323-332.
    Reproductive tourism is a manifestation of a larger, more inclusive trend toward globalization of capitalist cultural and material economies. This paper discusses the development of cross-border assisted reproduction within the globalized economy, transnational and local structural processes that influence the trade, social relations intersecting it, and implications for the healthcare systems affected. I focus on prevailing gender structures embedded in the cross-border trade and their intersection with other social and economic structures that reflect and impact globalization. I apply a (...)
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  8.  10
    Reproduction Expanded: Multifenerational and Multilineal Units of Evoultion.Maureen A. O’Malley - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):835-847.
    Reproduction is central to biology and evolution. Standard concepts of reproduction are drawn from animals. Nonstandard examples of reproduction can be found in unicellular eukaryotes that distribute their reproductive strategies across multiple generations, and in mutualistic systems that combine different modes of reproduction across multiple lineages. Examining multigenerational and multilineal reproducers and how they align fitness has implications for conceptualizing units of evolution.
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  9.  27
    Reproduction in Complex Life Cycles: Toward a Developmental Reaction Norms Perspective.James Griesemer - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):803-815.
    Biological reproduction is a material process of intertwined, recursive propagule generation and development, assuming that development produces simple life cycles. Most organisms, however, have more or less complex life cycles. Here, I attempt to reconcile recent articulations of a reproducer account with traditional approaches to complex life cycles by generalizing genetic demarcation criteria for life cycle generations in terms of the “scaffolded” development of hybrid reproducers. I argue that scaffolding provides a general method for identifying developmental bottlenecks and suggests (...)
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  10.  39
    Reproductive Genome Editing Interventions Are Therapeutic, Sometimes.César Palacios-González - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (6):557-562.
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  11. Reproductive Embryo Editing: Attending to Justice.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    The use of genome embryo editing tools in reproduction is often touted as a way to ensure the birth of healthy and genetically related children. Many would agree that this is a worthy goal. The purpose of this paper is to argue that, if we are concerned with justice, accepting such goal as morally appropriate commits one to rejecting the development of embryo editing for reproductive purposes. This is so because safer and more effective means exist that can allow (...)
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  12. Does Reproductive Justice Demand Insurance Coverage for IVF? Reflections on the Work of Anne Donchin.Carolyn McLeod - 2017 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (2):133-143.
    This paper comes out of a panel honoring the work of Anne Donchin (1940-2014), which took place at the 2016 Congress of the International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (FAB) in Edinburgh. My general aim is to highlight the contributions Anne made to feminist bioethics, and to feminist reproductive ethics in particular. My more specific aim, however, is to have a kind of conversation with Anne, through her work, about whether reproductive justice could demand insurance coverage for in vitro (...)
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  13.  51
    Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.Malene Tanderup, Sunita Reddy, Tulsi Patel & Birgitte Bruun Nielsen - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):491-501.
    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research (...)
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  14.  56
    Postnatal Reproductive Autonomy: Promoting Relational Autonomy and Self-Trust in New Parents.Sara Goering - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):9-19.
    New parents suddenly come face to face with myriad issues that demand careful attention but appear in a context unlikely to provide opportunities for extended or clear-headed critical reflection, whether at home with a new baby or in the neonatal intensive care unit. As such, their capacity for autonomy may be compromised. Attending to new parental autonomy as an extension of reproductive autonomy, and as a complicated phenomenon in its own right rather than simply as a matter to be balanced (...)
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  15. Self-Trust and Reproductive Autonomy.Carolyn McLeod - 2002 - MIT Press.
    The power of new medical technologies, the cultural authority of physicians, and the gendered power dynamics of many patient-physician relationships can all inhibit women's reproductive freedom. Often these factors interfere with women's ability to trust themselves to choose and act in ways that are consistent with their own goals and values. In this book Carolyn McLeod introduces to the reproductive ethics literature the idea that in reproductive health care women's self-trust can be undermined in ways that threaten their autonomy. Understanding (...)
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  16.  35
    Ethics and Human Reproduction: A Feminist Analysis.Christine Overall - 1987 - Allen & Unwin.
    This book should be essential reading for anyone interested in the new reproductive technologies, biomedical ethics, and women's health.
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  17.  60
    Reproductive Autonomous Choice – A Cherished Illusion? Reproductive Autonomy Examined in the Context of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis.Kristin Zeiler - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):175-183.
    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of (...)
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  18.  91
    Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics.Catherine Mills - 2011 - Springer.
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents to ‘choose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to these challenges by proposing a new framework for thinking about the ethics of reproduction that emphasizes the ways that social norms affect decisions about who is born. The book provides clear and thorough discussions of some of the dominant problems in reproductive ethics - human enhancement and the notion of the normal, reproductive (...)
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  19.  8
    Reproductive Technologies Are Not the Cure for Social Problems.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (2):85-86.
    Giulia Cavaliere disagrees with claims that ectogenesis will increase equality and freedom for women, arguing that they often ignore social context and consequently fail to recognise that ectogenesis may not benefit women or it may only benefit a small subset of already privileged women. In this commentary, I will contextualise her argument within the broader cultural milieu to highlight the pattern of reproductive advancements and technologies, such as egg freezing and birth control, being presented as the panacea for women’s inequality. (...)
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  20.  94
    Reproductive Biocrossings: Indian Egg Donors and Surrogates in the Globalized Fertility Market.Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):25-51.
    In November–December 2006, a four-part documentary, A Child against All Odds, aired on BBC television, presented by a renowned British infertility specialist, physician Robert Winston. The series portrayed the reproductive journeys of several couples who apparently had very low chances of biologically conceiving their own children. The series had all the ingredients of a medical thriller, with individuals, couples, and reproductive body parts (their own and donors’) crossing national boundaries and traveling thousands of miles in what Marcia Inhorn (2002) calls (...)
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  21.  45
    Cultural and Reproductive Success in Industrial Societies: Testing the Relationship at the Proximate and Ultimate Levels.Daniel Pérusse - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):267-283.
    In most social species, position in the male social hierarchy and reproductive success are positively correlated; in humans, however, this relationship is less clear, with studies of traditional societies yielding mixed results. In the most economically advanced human populations, the adaptiveness of status vanishes altogether; social status and fertility are uncorrelated. These findings have been interpreted to suggest that evolutionary principles may not be appropriate for the explanation of human behavior, especially in modern environments. The present study tests the adaptiveness (...)
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  22.  10
    Human Reproduction: Principles, Practices, Policies.Christine Overall - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    Who owns frozen human embryos? Are "surrogate motherhood" arrangements dangerous for women? Should access to in vitro fertilization be limited or increased? With the development of complex reproductive technologies and the ensuing controversies in reproductive ethics, there is an urgent need for more careful examination of moral principles, current practices, and social policies pertaining to reproduction. The issues examined in this collection of nine papers focusing of the Canadian experience include abortion, the cryopreservation of embryos, the selective termination of (...)
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  23.  7
    From Reproductive Work to Regenerative Labour: The Female Body and the Stem Cell Industries.Melinda Cooper & Catherine Waldby - 2010 - Feminist Theory 11 (1):3-22.
    The identification and valorization of unacknowledged, feminized forms of economic productivity has been an important task for feminist theory. In this article, we expand and rethink existing definitions of labour, in order to recognize the essential economic role women play in the stem cell and regenerative medicine industries, new fields of biomedical research that are rapidly expanding throughout the world. Women constitute the primary tissue donors in the new stem cell industries, which require high volumes of human embryos, oöcytes, foetal (...)
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  24.  84
    Reproductive Autonomy as Self-Making: Procreative Liberty and the Practice of Ethical Subjectivity.Catherine Mills - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):639-656.
    In this article, I consider recent debates on the notion of procreative liberty, to argue that reproductive freedom can be understood as a form of positive freedom—that is, the freedom to make oneself according to various ethical and aesthetic principles or values. To make this argument, I draw on Michel Foucault’s later work on ethics. Both adopting and adapting Foucault’s notion of ethics as a practice of the self and of liberty, I argue that reproductive autonomy requires enactment to gain (...)
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  25.  60
    Reproductive CRISPR Does Not Cure Disease.Tina Rulli - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1072-1082.
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  26. Stocking the Genetic Supermarket: Reproductive Genetic Technologies and Collective Action Problems.Chris Gyngell & Thomas Douglas - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (4):241-250.
    Reproductive genetic technologies allow parents to decide whether their future children will have or lack certain genetic predispositions. A popular model that has been proposed for regulating access to RGTs is the ‘genetic supermarket’. In the genetic supermarket, parents are free to make decisions about which genes to select for their children with little state interference. One possible consequence of the genetic supermarket is that collective action problems will arise: if rational individuals use the genetic supermarket in isolation from one (...)
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  27.  66
    Reproductive Ectogenesis: The Third Era of Human Reproduction and Some Moral Consequences.Stellan Welin - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):615-626.
    In a well known story Derek Parfit describes a disconnection between two entities that normally (in real life) travel together through space and time, namely your personal identity consisting of both mind and body. Realising the possibility of separation, even if it might never happen in real life, new questions arise that cast doubt on old solutions. In human reproduction, in real life, at present the fetus spends approximately nine months inside the pregnant woman. But, we might envisage other (...)
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  28.  95
    Artificial Reproduction, Blood Relatedness, and Human Identity.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2006 - The Monist 89 (4):548-566.
    The article discusses questions on the significance of blood relatedness in the context of identity arguments about artificial reproduction (AR). Kinship, origins, and biological connections are significant to human beings. The author explains that family relationships bear on the identity of human beings. Moreover, she emphasizes that once these principles are neglected, it is possible to create people in ways that threaten significant human bonds and alienate people who are naturally related spelling loss, confusion and grief for them.
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  29.  11
    Race, Reproduction, and Biopolitics: A Review Essay.Christopher Mayes - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):99-107.
    This review essay critically examines Catherine Mills’s Biopolitics and Camisha Russell’s The Assisted Reproduction of Race. Although distinct works, the centrality of race and reproduction provides a point of connection and an opening into reframing contemporary debates within bioethics and biopolitics. In reviewing these books together I hope to show how biopolitical theory and critical philosophy of race can be useful in looking at bioethical problems from a new perspective that open up different kinds of analyses, especially around (...)
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  30.  92
    Reproductive Autonomy, the Non-Identity Problem, and the Non-Person Problem.Russell Disilvestro - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):59-67.
    The Non-Identity Problem is the problem of explaining the apparent wrongness of a decision that does not harm people, especially since some of the people affected by the decision would not exist at all were it not for the decision. One approach to this problem, in the context of reproductive decisions, is to focus on wronging, rather than harming, one's offspring. But a Non-Person Problem emerges for any view that claims (1) that only persons can be wronged and (2) that (...)
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  31.  51
    Reproductive Tourism in Argentina: Clinic Accreditation and its Implications for Consumers, Health Professionals and Policy Makers.Elise Smith, Jason Behrmann, Carolina Martin & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2010 - Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):59-69.
    A subcategory of medical tourism, reproductive tourism has been the subject of much public and policy debate in recent years. Specific concerns include: the exploitation of individuals and communities, access to needed health care services, fair allocation of limited resources, and the quality and safety of services provided by private clinics. To date, the focus of attention has been on the thriving medical and reproductive tourism sectors in Asia and Eastern Europe; there has been much less consideration given to more (...)
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  32.  69
    Reproductive ‘Surrogacy’ and Parental Licensing.Christine Overall - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (5):353-361.
    A serious moral weakness of reproductive ‘surrogacy’ is that it can be harmful to the children who are created. This article presents a proposal for mitigating this weakness. Currently, the practice of commercial ‘surrogacy’ operates only in the interests of the adults involved , not in the interests of the child who is created. Whether ‘surrogacy’ is seen as the purchase of a baby, the purchase of parental rights, or the purchase of reproductive labor, all three views share the same (...)
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  33.  47
    Reproduction and the Central Project of Evolutionary Theory.Evelyn Fox Keller - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):383-396.
    In much of the discourse of evolutionary theory, reproduction is treated as an autonomous function of the individual organism — even in discussions of sexually reproducing organisms. In this paper, I examine some of the functions and consequences of such manifestly peculiar language. In particular, I suggest that it provides crucial support for the central project of evolutionary theory — namely that of locating causal efficacy in intrinsic properties of the individual organism. Furthermore, I argue that the language of (...)
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  34.  20
    Reproductive Outsourcing: An Empirical Ethics Account of Cross-Border Reproductive Care in Canada.Vincent Couture, Régen Drouin, Jean-Marie Moutquin, Patricia Monnier & Chantal Bouffard - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):41-47.
    Cross-border reproductive care can be defined as the movement from one jurisdiction to another for medically assisted reproduction. CBRC raises many ethical concerns that have been addressed extensively. However, the conclusions are still based on scarce evidence even considering the global scale of CBRC. Empirical ethics appears as a way to foster this ethical reflection on CBRC while attuning it with the experiences of its main actors. To better understand the ‘in and out’ situation of CBRC in Canada, we (...)
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  35.  37
    Assisted Reproduction and Distributive Justice.Vida Panitch - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (2):108-117.
    The Canadian province of Quebec recently amended its Health Insurance Act to cover the costs of In Vitro Fertilization . The province of Ontario recently de-insured IVF. Both provinces cited cost-effectiveness as their grounds, but the question as to whether a public health insurance system ought to cover IVF raises the deeper question of how we should understand reproduction at the social level, and whether its costs should be a matter of individual or collective responsibility. In this article I (...)
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  36. Reproductive Politics, Biopolitics and Auto-Immunity: From Foucault to Esposito. [REVIEW]Penelope Deutscher - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):217-226.
    The contingent cultural, epistemological and ontological status of biology is highlighted by changes in attitudes towards reproductive politics in the history of feminist movements. Consider, for example, the American, British, and numerous European instances of feminist sympathy for eugenics at the turn of the century. This amounted to a specific formation of the role, in late nineteenth and early twentieth century feminisms, of concepts of biological risk and defence, which were transformed into the justificatory language of rights claims. In this (...)
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  37.  52
    Genome Editing and Assisted Reproduction: Curing Embryos, Society or Prospective Parents?Giulia Cavaliere - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):215-225.
    This paper explores the ethics of introducing genome-editing technologies as a new reproductive option. In particular, it focuses on whether genome editing can be considered a morally valuable alternative to preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Two arguments against the use of genome editing in reproduction are analysed, namely safety concerns and germline modification. These arguments are then contrasted with arguments in favour of genome editing, in particular with the argument of the child’s welfare and the argument of parental reproductive autonomy. In (...)
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  38. Reproduction, Partiality, and the Non-Identity Problem.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2009 - In M. A. Roberts & D. T. Wasserman (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer Verlag. pp. 231--248.
    Much work in contemporary bioethics defends a broadly liberal view of human reproduction. I shall take this view to comprise (but not to be exhausted by) the following four claims.1 First, it is permissible both to reproduce and not to reproduce, either by traditional means or by means of assisted reproductive techniques such as IVF and genetic screening. Second, it is permissible either to reproduce or to adopt or otherwise foster an existing child to which one is not biologically (...)
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  39.  6
    Reproductive Technologies, Care Crisis and Inter-Generational Relations in North India: Towards a Local Ethics of Care.Paro Mishra - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):91-109.
    This paper reflects on the social consequences of biotechnological control of population for values and ethics of care within the family household in rural north India. Based on long-term ethnographic research, it illustrates the manner in which social practices intermingle with reproductive choices and new reproductive technologies, leading to a systematic elimination of female foetuses, and thus, imbalanced sex ratios. This technological fashioning of populations, the paper argues, has far-reaching consequences for the institutions of family, marriage and kinship in north (...)
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  40.  32
    Reproductive Tourism as Moral Pluralism in Motion.G. Pennings - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):337-341.
    Reproductive tourism is the travelling by candidate service recipients from one institution, jurisdiction, or country where treatment is not available to another institution, jurisdiction, or country where they can obtain the kind of medically assisted reproduction they desire. The more widespread this phenomenon, the louder the call for international measures to stop these movements. Three possible solutions are discussed: internal moral pluralism, coerced conformity, and international harmonisation. The position is defended that allowing reproductive tourism is a form of tolerance (...)
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  41.  6
    Conscience in Reproductive Health Care: Prioritizing Patient Interests.Carolyn McLeod - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Conscience in Reproductive Health Care responds to the growing worldwide trend of health care professionals conscientiously refusing to provide abortions and similar reproductive health services in countries where these services are legal and professionally accepted. Carolyn McLeod argues that conscientious objectors in health care should prioritize the interests of patients in receiving care over their own interest in acting on their conscience. She defends this "prioritizing approach" to conscientious objection over the more popular "compromise approach" without downplaying the importance of (...)
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  42. Reproductive Cloning, Genetic Engineering and the Autonomy of the Child: The Moral Agent and the Open Future.Matteo Mameli - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):87-93.
    Some authors have argued that the human use of reproductive cloning and genetic engineering should be prohibited because these biotechnologies would undermine the autonomy of the resulting child. In this paper, two versions of this view are discussed. According to the first version, the autonomy of cloned and genetically engineered people would be undermined because knowledge of the method by which these people have been conceived would make them unable to assume full responsibility for their actions. According to the second (...)
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  43. Human Reproductive Cloning: A Conflict of Liberties.Joyce C. Havstad - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (2):71-77.
    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds (...)
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  44.  2
    Reproduction, Race, and Gender in Philosophy and the Early Life Sciences.Susanne Lettow (ed.) - 2014 - State University of New York Press.
  45.  11
    Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law.Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla - 2003 - Clarendon Press.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. This is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept of reproductive health, which though internationally endorsed, is still contested. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics. They integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They analyse 15 cases from different countries (...)
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  46.  19
    Resources, Reproduction, and Mate Competition in Human Populations.Mark V. Flinn - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):305-307.
  47. Reproductive Entanglements: Body, State, and Culture in the Dys/Regulation of Child-Bearing.Rayna Rapp - 2011 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (3):693-718.
    Although conventionally tracked in the "overdeveloped world" , assistive reproductive technologies are now available in many parts of the globe. This review essay reports on qualitative social science research on techniques such as In Vitro Fertilization, egg purchase, gestational surrogacy, and sex selection across national boundaries. It highlights the disruptions and recuperations of gender and generational relations; religious and legislative regulation; and the opportunities as well as oppressions that the commercialization of the reproductive body entail.
     
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  48. New Reproductive Technologies and Disembodiment.Carla Lam - unknown
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  49. La Reproduction Éléments Pour Une Théorie du Système D'Enseignement.Pierre Bourdieu & Jean Claude Passeron - 1970 - Minuit.
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  50.  41
    Reproductive Choice, Enhancement, and the Moral Continuum Argument.E. Malmqvist - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (1):41-54.
    It is often argued that it does not matter morally whether biomedical interventions treat or prevent diseases or enhance nondisease traits; what matters is whether and how much they promote well-being. Therapy and enhancement both promote well-being, the argument goes, so they are not morally distinct but instead continuous. I provide three reasons why this argument should be rejected when it is applied to choices concerning the genetic makeup of future people. First, it rests on too simple a conception of (...)
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