Results for 'reproduction'

1000+ found
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  1.  14
    Women and new reproductive.New Reproductive - 1992 - In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. pp. 695--167.
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  2. Reproductive genome editing interventions are therapeutic, sometimes.César Palacios-González - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (6):557-562.
    In this paper I argue that some human reproductive genome editing interventions can be therapeutic in nature, and thus that it is false that all such interventions just create healthy individuals. I do this by showing that the conditions established by a therapy definition are met by certain reproductive genome editing interventions. I then defend this position against two objections: (a) reproductive genome editing interventions do not attain one of the two conditions for something to be a therapy, and (b) (...)
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  3. Reproductive freedom, self-regulation, and the government of impairment in utero.Shelley Tremain - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):35-53.
    : This article critically examines the constitution of impairment in prenatal testing and screening practices and various discourses that surround these technologies. While technologies to test and screen prenatally are claimed to enhance women's capacity to be self-determining, make informed reproductive choices, and, in effect, wrest control of their bodies from a patriarchal medical establishment, I contend that this emerging relation between pregnant women and reproductive technologies is a new strategy of a form of power that began to emerge in (...)
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  4.  2
    Disclosing Reproductive Genetic Carrier Status: What about the Donor?Dorian Accoe - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (7):126-128.
    In their recent article, Dive, Holmes, and Newson (2023) argue that genetic information should be reported in accordance with the aims of reproductive genetic carrier screening (RGCS). Referring to...
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  5. Reproductive Embryo Editing: Attending to Justice.Inmaculada De Melo-Martín - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (4):26-33.
    The use of genome embryo editing tools in reproduction is often touted as a way to ensure the birth of healthy and genetically related children. Many would agree that this is a worthy goal. The purpose of this paper is to argue that, if we are concerned with justice, accepting such goal as morally appropriate commits one to rejecting the development of embryo editing for reproductive purposes. This is so because safer and more effective means exist that can allow (...)
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  6. Reproduction in Education, Society and Culture.Pierre Bourdieu, Professor Pierre Bourdieu & Jean-Claude Passeron - 1990 - SAGE Publications.
    The authors develop an analysis of education. They show how education carries an essentially arbitrary cultural scheme which is actually based on power. More widely, the reproduction of culture through education is shown to play a key part in the reproduction of the whole social system.
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  7. Can reproductive genetic manipulation save lives?G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (3):381-386.
    It has recently been argued that reproductive genetic manipulation technologies like mitochondrial replacement and germline CRISPR modifications cannot be said to save anyone’s life because, counterfactually, no one would suffer more or die sooner absent the intervention. The present article argues that, on the contrary, reproductive genetic manipulations may be life-saving (and, from this, have therapeutic value) under an appropriate population health perspective. As such, popular reports of reproductive genetic manipulations potentially saving lives or preventing disease are not necessarily mistaken, (...)
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  8.  58
    Reproductive tourism and the Quest for global gender justice.Anne Donchin - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (7):323-332.
    Reproductive tourism is a manifestation of a larger, more inclusive trend toward globalization of capitalist cultural and material economies. This paper discusses the development of cross-border assisted reproduction within the globalized economy, transnational and local structural processes that influence the trade, social relations intersecting it, and implications for the healthcare systems affected. I focus on prevailing gender structures embedded in the cross-border trade and their intersection with other social and economic structures that reflect and impact globalization. I apply a (...)
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  9. Reproductive technology: A critical analysis of theological responses in christianity and Islam.Mohd Shuhaimi Bin Ishak & Sayed Sikandar Shah Haneef - 2014 - Zygon 49 (2):396-413.
    Reproductive medical technology has revolutionized the natural order of human procreation. Accordingly, some have celebrated its advent as a new and liberating determinant of kinship at the global level and advocate it as a right to reproductive health while others have frowned upon it as a vehicle for “guiltless exchange of sexual fluid” and commodification of human gametes. Religious voices from both Christianity and Islam range from unthinking adoption to restrictive use. While utilizing this technology to enable the married couple (...)
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  10.  80
    Reproductive Violence and Settler Statecraft.Elena Ruíz, Nora Berenstain & Nerli Paredes-Ruvalcaba - forthcoming - In Sanaullah Khan & Elliott Schwebach (eds.), Global Histories of Trauma: Globalization, Displacement and Psychiatry. Routledge. pp. 150-173.
    Gender-based forms of administrative violence, such as reproductive violence, are the result of systems designed to enact population-level harms through the production and forcible imposition of colonial systems of gender. Settler statecraft has long relied on the strategic promotion of sexual and reproductive violence. Patterns of reproductive violence adapt and change to align with the enduring goals and evolving needs of settler colonial occupation, dispossession, and containment. The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to end the constitutional right to abortion in (...)
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  11.  52
    Queer reproduction revisited and why race, class and citizenship still matters: A response to Cristina Richie.Doris Leibetseder - 2017 - Bioethics 32 (2):138-144.
    In the dialogue between Timothy F. Murphy and Cristina Richie about queer bioethics and queer reproduction in this journal, significant points of the emergent and extremely important discussions on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer bioethics are raised. Richie specifies correctly that queer bioethics can either complement or contradict LGBT bioethics and the queer standpoint against heteroconformity and heterofuturity is decisive here. As the field of queer bioethics is such a recent and essential part of consideration for bioethics and (...)
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  12.  25
    Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law.Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla - 2003 - Oxford, GB: Clarendon Press.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. This is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept of reproductive health, which though internationally endorsed, is still contested. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics. They integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They analyse 15 cases from different countries (...)
  13. Does Reproductive Justice Demand Insurance Coverage for IVF? Reflections on the Work of Anne Donchin.Carolyn McLeod - 2017 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (2):133-143.
    This paper comes out of a panel honoring the work of Anne Donchin (1940-2014), which took place at the 2016 Congress of the International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (FAB) in Edinburgh. My general aim is to highlight the contributions Anne made to feminist bioethics, and to feminist reproductive ethics in particular. My more specific aim, however, is to have a kind of conversation with Anne, through her work, about whether reproductive justice could demand insurance coverage for in vitro (...)
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  14.  55
    Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.Malene Tanderup, Sunita Reddy, Tulsi Patel & Birgitte Bruun Nielsen - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):491-501.
    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research (...)
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  15.  18
    Reproductive Timing and Climate Change.Olle Torpman - 2021 - Philosophies 6 (2):47.
    It has been argued that the most impactful choice an individual could make, with respect to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, is to have fewer children. This paper brings up a related aspect of individuals’ reproductive choices that has been neglected in the climate ethics literature: the timing aspect. It is argued that, from a climate change perspective, it does not matter only how many children people bring into existence, but also when they are brought into existence. The reason is that (...)
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  16.  60
    Postnatal reproductive autonomy: Promoting relational autonomy and self-trust in new parents.Sara Goering - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (1):9-19.
    New parents suddenly come face to face with myriad issues that demand careful attention but appear in a context unlikely to provide opportunities for extended or clear-headed critical reflection, whether at home with a new baby or in the neonatal intensive care unit. As such, their capacity for autonomy may be compromised. Attending to new parental autonomy as an extension of reproductive autonomy, and as a complicated phenomenon in its own right rather than simply as a matter to be balanced (...)
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  17.  12
    Reproduction Expanded: Multifenerational and Multilineal Units of Evoultion.Maureen A. O’Malley - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):835-847.
    Reproduction is central to biology and evolution. Standard concepts of reproduction are drawn from animals. Nonstandard examples of reproduction can be found in unicellular eukaryotes that distribute their reproductive strategies across multiple generations, and in mutualistic systems that combine different modes of reproduction across multiple lineages. Examining multigenerational and multilineal reproducers and how they align fitness has implications for conceptualizing units of evolution.
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  18.  75
    Reproductive CRISPR does not cure disease.Tina Rulli - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1072-1082.
    Given recent advancements in CRISPR‐Cas9 powered genetic modification of gametes and embryos, both popular media and scientific articles are hailing CRISPR’s life‐saving, curative potential for people with serious monogenic diseases. But claims that CRISPR modification of gametes or embryos, a form of germline engineering, has therapeutic value are deeply mistaken. This article explains why reproductive uses of CRISPR, and germline engineering more generally, do not treat or save lives that would otherwise have a genetic disease. Reproductive uses of CRISPR create (...)
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  19.  47
    Reproduction and the central project of evolutionary theory.Evelyn Fox Keller - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):383-396.
    In much of the discourse of evolutionary theory, reproduction is treated as an autonomous function of the individual organism — even in discussions of sexually reproducing organisms. In this paper, I examine some of the functions and consequences of such manifestly peculiar language. In particular, I suggest that it provides crucial support for the central project of evolutionary theory — namely that of locating causal efficacy in intrinsic properties of the individual organism. Furthermore, I argue that the language of (...)
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  20.  23
    Ethics, Reproduction, and Genetic Control.Ruth F. Chadwick (ed.) - 1992 - Routledge.
    In this revised edition with a new preface from the editor, leading scientists explain the nature and goals of `test tube' reproduction and genetic engineering, and their eugenic implications. In contrast to the Warnock report, the extended commentary considers the issues in the context of a social ethic rather than the individualist viewpoint.
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  21.  2
    Artificial reproduction? Tabita Rezaire’s Sugar Walls Teardom and AI “liveness”.Sara Morais dos Santos Bruss - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-9.
    Much more than their machinic reality, current iterations of AI rely on imagined divisions of human and non-human properties and skills that have genealogical ties to colonization. For this reason, research efforts have recently been made to historicize these imaginaries, connecting them to colonial ideals that delegate black and brown colonized people into the realm of the non-human. Atanasoski and Vora (Surrogate humanity. Race, robots and the politics of technological futures, Duke, Durham and London, 2019) have called this a “surrogate (...)
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  22.  99
    Artificial Reproduction, Blood Relatedness, and Human Identity.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2006 - The Monist 89 (4):548-566.
    The article discusses questions on the significance of blood relatedness in the context of identity arguments about artificial reproduction (AR). Kinship, origins, and biological connections are significant to human beings. The author explains that family relationships bear on the identity of human beings. Moreover, she emphasizes that once these principles are neglected, it is possible to create people in ways that threaten significant human bonds and alienate people who are naturally related spelling loss, confusion and grief for them.
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  23.  61
    Reproductive autonomous choice – A cherished illusion? Reproductive autonomy examined in the context of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.Kristin Zeiler - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):175-183.
    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of (...)
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  24.  42
    Reproduction in Complex Life Cycles: Toward a Developmental Reaction Norms Perspective.James Griesemer - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):803-815.
    Biological reproduction is a material process of intertwined, recursive propagule generation and development, assuming that development produces simple life cycles. Most organisms, however, have more or less complex life cycles. Here, I attempt to reconcile recent articulations of a reproducer account with traditional approaches to complex life cycles by generalizing genetic demarcation criteria for life cycle generations in terms of the “scaffolded” development of hybrid reproducers. I argue that scaffolding provides a general method for identifying developmental bottlenecks and suggests (...)
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  25.  5
    “Reproductive Negligence”: A Necessary and Sufficient Remedy?Rachel L. Zacharias - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (5):44-45.
    This book review essay discusses Birth Rights and Wrongs: How Medicine and Technology Are Remaking Reproduction and the Law (2019), by Dov Fox.
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  26.  3
    Reproductive timing. New forms and ambivalences of the temporal optimisation of reproduction and their ethical challenges.Vera King, Pia Lodtka, Isabella Marcinski-Michel, Julia Schreiber & Claudia Wiesemann - 2023 - Ethik in der Medizin 35 (1):43-56.
    Definition of the problem The article addresses the relationship between reproduction, time and the good life. Services offered by reproductive medicine and conceptions of the good life in time influence each other reciprocally. This interaction is characterised by implicit and explicit normative settings and expectations of appropriate temporality. Arguments We first discuss the significance of time for the life course and for parenthood from a sociological and social psychological perspective. Reproductive medicine can increase the options for becoming a parent (...)
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  27.  1
    Ethics, Reproduction, and Genetic Control.Ruth F. Chadwick (ed.) - 1987 - Routledge.
    In this revised edition with a new preface from the editor, leading scientists explain the nature and goals of `test tube' reproduction and genetic engineering, and their eugenic implications. In contrast to the Warnock report, the extended commentary considers the issues in the context of a social ethic rather than the individualist viewpoint.
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  28.  41
    Assisted Reproduction and Distributive Justice.Vida Panitch - 2013 - Bioethics 29 (2):108-117.
    The Canadian province of Quebec recently amended its Health Insurance Act to cover the costs of In Vitro Fertilization . The province of Ontario recently de-insured IVF. Both provinces cited cost-effectiveness as their grounds, but the question as to whether a public health insurance system ought to cover IVF raises the deeper question of how we should understand reproduction at the social level, and whether its costs should be a matter of individual or collective responsibility. In this article I (...)
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  29.  10
    Imagining Reproduction in Science and History.Roger Pierson & Raymond Stephanson - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):1-9.
    Reproduction is at the core of many aspects of human existence. It is intrinsic in our biology and in the broad social constructs in which we all reside. The introduction to this special issue is designed to reflect on some of the differences between the humanities/arts and the sciences on the subject of Reproduction now and in the past. The intellectual/cultural distance between humanists and reproductive biologists is vast, yet communication between the Two Cultures has much to offer (...)
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  30.  21
    Reproductive Rights without Resources or Recourse.Kimberly Mutcherson - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (s3):S12-S18.
    The U.S. Supreme Court declared procreation to be a fundamental right in the early twentieth century in a case involving Oklahoma's Habitual Criminal Sterilization Act, an act that permitted unconsented sterilization of individuals convicted of certain crimes. The right that the Court articulated in that case is a negative right: it requires that the government not place unjustified roadblocks in the way of people seeking to procreate, but it does not require the government to take positive steps to help people (...)
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  31.  33
    Reproductive tourism as moral pluralism in motion.G. Pennings - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):337-341.
    Reproductive tourism is the travelling by candidate service recipients from one institution, jurisdiction, or country where treatment is not available to another institution, jurisdiction, or country where they can obtain the kind of medically assisted reproduction they desire. The more widespread this phenomenon, the louder the call for international measures to stop these movements. Three possible solutions are discussed: internal moral pluralism, coerced conformity, and international harmonisation. The position is defended that allowing reproductive tourism is a form of tolerance (...)
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  32. Human reproductive cloning: A conflict of liberties.Joyce C. Havstad - 2008 - Bioethics 24 (2):71-77.
    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds (...)
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  33.  68
    Reproductive ectogenesis: The third era of human reproduction and some moral consequences.Stellan Welin - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):615-626.
    In a well known story Derek Parfit describes a disconnection between two entities that normally (in real life) travel together through space and time, namely your personal identity consisting of both mind and body. Realising the possibility of separation, even if it might never happen in real life, new questions arise that cast doubt on old solutions. In human reproduction, in real life, at present the fetus spends approximately nine months inside the pregnant woman. But, we might envisage other (...)
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  34.  36
    Reproductive justice: Non‐interference or non‐domination?Himani Bhakuni - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):93-98.
    The reproductive justice movement started by black women’s rights activists made its way into the academic literature as an intersectional approach to women’s reproductive autonomy. While there are many scholars who now employ the term ‘reproductive justice’ in their research, few have taken up the task of explaining what ‘justice’ entails in reproductive justice. In this paper I take up part of this work and attempt to clarify the relevant kind of freedom an adequate theory of reproductive justice would postulate. (...)
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  35.  23
    Reproductive Gifts and Gift Giving: The Altruistic Woman.Janice G. Raymond - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (6):7-11.
    Reproductive gift relationships must be seen in their totality, not just as helping someone have a child. Noncommercial surrogacy cannot be treated as a mere act of altruism—any valorizing of altruistic surrogacy and reproductive gift‐giving must be assessed within the wider context of women's political inequality.
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  36.  17
    Human Reproduction: Principles, Practices, Policies.Christine Overall - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    Who owns frozen human embryos? Are "surrogate motherhood" arrangements dangerous for women? Should access to in vitro fertilization be limited or increased? With the development of complex reproductive technologies and the ensuing controversies in reproductive ethics, there is an urgent need for more careful examination of moral principles, current practices, and social policies pertaining to reproduction. The issues examined in this collection of nine papers focusing of the Canadian experience include abortion, the cryopreservation of embryos, the selective termination of (...)
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  37. Reproductive politics, biopolitics and auto-immunity: From Foucault to Esposito. [REVIEW]Penelope Deutscher - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):217-226.
    The contingent cultural, epistemological and ontological status of biology is highlighted by changes in attitudes towards reproductive politics in the history of feminist movements. Consider, for example, the American, British, and numerous European instances of feminist sympathy for eugenics at the turn of the century. This amounted to a specific formation of the role, in late nineteenth and early twentieth century feminisms, of concepts of biological risk and defence, which were transformed into the justificatory language of rights claims. In this (...)
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  38.  11
    Reproductive carrier screening: responding to the eugenics critique.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (12):1060-1067.
    Reproductive genetic carrier screening (RCS), when offered to anyone regardless of their family history or ancestry, has been subject to the critique that it is a form of eugenics. Eugenics describes a range of practices that seek to use the science of heredity to improve the genetic composition of a population group. The term is associated with a range of unethical programmes that were taken up in various countries during the 20th century. Contemporary practice in medical genetics has, understandably, distanced (...)
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  39.  97
    Reproductive autonomy, the non-identity problem, and the non-person problem.Russell Disilvestro - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (1):59-67.
    The Non-Identity Problem is the problem of explaining the apparent wrongness of a decision that does not harm people, especially since some of the people affected by the decision would not exist at all were it not for the decision. One approach to this problem, in the context of reproductive decisions, is to focus on wronging, rather than harming, one's offspring. But a Non-Person Problem emerges for any view that claims (1) that only persons can be wronged and (2) that (...)
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  40.  14
    Reproductive technologies are not the cure for social problems.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (2):85-86.
    Giulia Cavaliere disagrees with claims that ectogenesis will increase equality and freedom for women, arguing that they often ignore social context and consequently fail to recognise that ectogenesis may not benefit women or it may only benefit a small subset of already privileged women. In this commentary, I will contextualise her argument within the broader cultural milieu to highlight the pattern of reproductive advancements and technologies, such as egg freezing and birth control, being presented as the panacea for women’s inequality. (...)
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  41. New Reproductive Technologies are Morally Problematic.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2000 - In James Torr (ed.), Medical Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
    A short article examining the problems of the fertility industry, commodifying human life and allowing unaccountable third parties to create children in ways that undermine their identity by way of donor conception, human cloning and artificial reproductive techniques.
     
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  42.  5
    Reproduction of the species publicator codex.Richard Abel - 1990 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 1 (1):22-26.
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  43.  55
    Reproductive tourism in argentina: Clinic accreditation and its implications for consumers, health professionals and policy makers.Elise Smith, Jason Behrmann, Carolina Martin & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):59-69.
    A subcategory of medical tourism, reproductive tourism has been the subject of much public and policy debate in recent years. Specific concerns include: the exploitation of individuals and communities, access to needed health care services, fair allocation of limited resources, and the quality and safety of services provided by private clinics. To date, the focus of attention has been on the thriving medical and reproductive tourism sectors in Asia and Eastern Europe; there has been much less consideration given to more (...)
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  44.  19
    Assisted Reproduction: A Comparative Review of IVF Policies in Two Pro-Natalist Countries. [REVIEW]Ekaterina Balabanova & Frida Simonstein - 2010 - Health Care Analysis 18 (2):188-202.
    Policies on reproduction have become an increasingly important tool for governments seeking to meet the so-called demographic ‘challenge’ created by the combination of low fertility and lengthening life expectancies. However, the tension between the state and the market in health care is present in all countries around the world due to the scare resources available and the understandable importance of the health issues. The field of assisted reproduction, as part of the health care system, is affected by this (...)
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  45.  95
    Reproductive biocrossings: Indian egg donors and surrogates in the globalized fertility market.Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):25-51.
    A growing number of infertile couples and other individuals desiring children are seeking to fulfill their desire for parenthood transnationally through the use of donor gametes and a surrogate. The number of “fertility tourists” from developed countries to low-income countries is growing phenomenally. Indian women, too, are participating as producers in these “biocrossings,” turning India into the surrogacy outsourcing capital of the world in the globalized bioeconomy of assisted reproduction. I argue for a ban on commercial egg donation and (...)
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  46.  11
    Reproductive Freedom and the Paradigmatic Character of Plato's "Republic".Thanassis Samaras - 2020 - AKROPOLIS: Journal of Hellenic Studies 4:36-49.
    In the Republic, the paradigmatic character of Plato’s best city appears incompatible with the use of deception in the procreative practices of the Auxiliaries and Guardians. I argue that this incongruity, as well as the exact provisions of Plato’s reproduction festival, are explained by three facts: his commitment to eugenics, his insistence on the abolition of the typical Greek household and his belief that there are serious limitations to the type of knowledge that Auxiliaries can achieve.
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  47.  29
    Assisted reproduction technologies and reproductive justice in the production of parenthood and origin: Uses and meanings of the co‐produced gestation and the surrogacy in Brazil.Aureliano Lopes da Silva Junior, Mônica Fortuna Pontes & Anna Paula Uziel - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):122-137.
    This article examines the construction of parenthood, drawing on Brazilian cisgender, heterosexual, and homosexual couples' experiences in using assisted reproduction technologies (ART), particularly the surrogacy. For that purpose, we interviewed: 1) a lesbian woman who had her daughter through her partner's pregnancy, using ART with anonymous donor semen; 2) a gay man who, together with his partner, used a surrogacy service under contract via a specialised offshore agency; 3) a woman who was a surrogate, in Brazil, for her sister-in-law (...)
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  48.  92
    Reproductive cloning in humans and therapeutic cloning in primates: is the ethical debate catching up with the recent scientific advances?S. Camporesi & L. Bortolotti - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e15-e15.
    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved so (...)
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  49.  90
    Reproductive Autonomy as Self-Making: Procreative Liberty and the Practice of Ethical Subjectivity.Catherine Mills - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):639-656.
    In this article, I consider recent debates on the notion of procreative liberty, to argue that reproductive freedom can be understood as a form of positive freedom—that is, the freedom to make oneself according to various ethical and aesthetic principles or values. To make this argument, I draw on Michel Foucault’s later work on ethics. Both adopting and adapting Foucault’s notion of ethics as a practice of the self and of liberty, I argue that reproductive autonomy requires enactment to gain (...)
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    Race, Reproduction, and Biopolitics: A Review Essay.Christopher Mayes - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):99-107.
    This review essay critically examines Catherine Mills’s Biopolitics and Camisha Russell’s The Assisted Reproduction of Race. Although distinct works, the centrality of race and reproduction provides a point of connection and an opening into reframing contemporary debates within bioethics and biopolitics. In reviewing these books together I hope to show how biopolitical theory and critical philosophy of race can be useful in looking at bioethical problems from a new perspective that open up different kinds of analyses, especially around (...)
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