Results for 'representation'

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  1. Focus in discourse: Alternative semantics vs. a representational approach in sdrt.Semantics Vs A. Representational - 2004 - In J.M. Larrazabal & L.A Perez Miranda (eds.), Language, Knowledge, and Representation. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 51.
     
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  2. Interpretation in Science and in the Arts.Art as Representation - 1993 - In George Levine (ed.), Realism and Representation. University of Wisconsin Press.
     
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  3. Elisabetta ladavas and Alessandro farne.Representations Of Space & Near Specific Body Parts - 2004 - In Charles Spence & Jon Driver (eds.), Crossmodal Space and Crossmodal Attention. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Scientific representation: Against similarity and isomorphism.Mauricio Suárez - 2003 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (3):225-244.
    I argue against theories that attempt to reduce scientific representation to similarity or isomorphism. These reductive theories aim to radically naturalize the notion of representation, since they treat scientist's purposes and intentions as non-essential to representation. I distinguish between the means and the constituents of representation, and I argue that similarity and isomorphism are common but not universal means of representation. I then present four other arguments to show that similarity and isomorphism are not the (...)
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  5.  47
    Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective.B. C. van Fraassen - 2010 - Analysis 70 (3):511-514.
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  6.  54
    The meaning of representation in animal memory.H. L. Roitblat - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):353-372.
    A representation is a remnant of previous experience that allows that experience to affect later behavior. This paper develops a metatheoretical view of representation and applies it to issues concerning representation in animals. To describe a representational system one must specify the following: thedomainor range of situations in the represented world to which the system applies; thecontentor set of features encoded and preserved by the system; thecodeor transformational rules relating features of the representation to the corresponding (...)
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  7. Predictive Processing and the Representation Wars.Daniel Williams - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (1):141-172.
    Clark has recently suggested that predictive processing advances a theory of neural function with the resources to put an ecumenical end to the “representation wars” of recent cognitive science. In this paper I defend and develop this suggestion. First, I broaden the representation wars to include three foundational challenges to representational cognitive science. Second, I articulate three features of predictive processing’s account of internal representation that distinguish it from more orthodox representationalist frameworks. Specifically, I argue that it (...)
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  8. Buata MALELA.Comme Représentation Et Mode de Proximité & Avec Soi-Même Et le Monde - 2007 - Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme 116:85.
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  9.  51
    Representation and Reality.Robert Stalnaker - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):359.
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  10. Representation in Scientific Practice.Ronald N. Giere, Michael Lynch & Steve Woolgar - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):113-120.
  11. Deflationary representation, inference, and practice.Mauricio Suárez - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 49 (C):36-47.
    This paper defends the deflationary character of two recent views regarding scientific representation, namely RIG Hughes’ DDI model and the inferential conception. It is first argued that these views’ deflationism is akin to the homonymous position in discussions regarding the nature of truth. There, we are invited to consider the platitudes that the predicate “true” obeys at the level of practice, disregarding any deeper, or more substantive, account of its nature. More generally, for any concept X, a deflationary approach (...)
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  12.  19
    Event representation in Pavlovian conditioning: Image and action.Peter C. Holland - 1990 - Cognition 37 (1-2):105-131.
  13.  40
    Non-symbolic compositional representation and its neuronal foundation: towards an emulative semantics.M. Werning - 2012 - In Markus Werning, Wolfram Hinzen & Edouard Machery (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Compositionality. Oxford University Press.
    This article proposes a neurobiologically motivated theory of meaning as internal representation that holds on to the principle of compositionality, but negates the principle of semantic constituency. The approach builds on neurobiological findings regarding topologically structured cortical feature maps and the mechanism of object-related binding by neuronal synchronization. It incorporates the Gestalt principles of psychology and is implemented by recurrent neural networks. The semantics to be developed is structurally analogous to some variant of model-theoretical semantics. The semantics to be (...)
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  14.  9
    Peirce's twenty-eight classes of signs and the philosophy of representation: rhetoric, interpretation and hexadic semiosis.Tony Jappy - 2017 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing PIc.
    The Philosophy of Representation -- The Transition -- The Sign-Systems of 1908 -- Rhetorical Concerns -- Interpretation, Worldviews and the Object.
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  15. Cognition Without Neural Representation: Dynamics of a Complex System.Inês Hipólito - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This paper proposes an account of neurocognitive activity without leveraging the notion of neural representation. Neural representation is a concept that results from assuming that the properties of the models used in computational cognitive neuroscience must literally exist the system being modelled. Computational models are important tools to test a theory about how the collected data has been generated. While the usefulness of computational models is unquestionable, it does not follow that neurocognitive activity should literally entail the properties (...)
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  16. Historical Representation.F. R. Ankersmit - 1988 - History and Theory 27 (3):205-228.
    The vocabulary of representation is better suited to an understanding of historiography than the vocabularies of description and interpretation. Since both art and historiography represent the world, they are closer to science than are criticism and the history of art because the interpretation of meaning is the specialty of the latter two fields. Historiography is less secure in its attempt to represent the world than art is; historiography is more artificial, more an expression of cultural codes than art itself. (...)
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  17.  19
    subset of Treisman and DeSchepper's (1996) experiments.Can Object Representations Be - 2012 - In Jeremy Wolfe & Lynn Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. pp. 253.
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  18.  17
    Distinguishing theories of representation: A critique of Anderson's "Arguments concerning mental imagery.".Frederick Hayes-Roth - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (4):376-382.
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  19.  65
    Categorization and representation of physics problems by experts and novices.Michelene T. H. Chi, Paul J. Feltovich & Robert Glaser - 1981 - Cognitive Science 5 (2):121-52.
    The representation of physics problems in relation to the organization of physics knowledge is investigated in experts and novices. Four experiments examine the existence of problem categories as a basis for representation; differences in the categories used by experts and novices; differences in the knowledge associated with the categories; and features in the problems that contribute to problem categorization and representation. Results from sorting tasks and protocols reveal that experts and novices begin their problem representations with specifiably (...)
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  20. Meaning and Mental Representation.Robert Cummins - 1990 - Mind 99 (396):637-642.
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  21.  30
    Representation and Expression in Sport and Art.Spencer K. Wertz - 1985 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 12 (1):8-24.
  22. Models: Representation and Scientific Understanding.M. W. Wartofsky - 1983 - Critica 15 (43):151-152.
  23.  56
    Thin versus thick accounts of scientific representation.Michael Poznic - 2018 - Synthese 195 (8):3433-3451.
    This paper proposes a novel distinction between accounts of scientific representation: it distinguishes thin accounts from thick accounts. Thin accounts focus on the descriptive aspect of representation whereas thick accounts acknowledge the evaluative aspect of representation. Thin accounts focus on the question of what a representation as such is. Thick accounts start from the question of what an adequate representation is. In this paper, I give two arguments in favor of a thick account, the Argument (...)
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  24.  91
    Mental Representation: A Reader.Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.) - 1994 - Cambridge, USA: Blackwell.
    This volume is a collection of new and previously published essays focusing on one of the most exciting and actively discussed topics in contemporary philosophy: naturalistic theories of mental content. The volume brings together important papers written by some of the most distinguished theorists working in the field today. Authors contributing to the volume include Jerry Fodor, Ruth Millikan, Fred Dretske, Ned Block, Robert Cummins, and Daniel Dennett.
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  25.  77
    Representation, Bicameralism, Political Equality, and Sortition: Reconstituting the Second Chamber as a Randomly Selected Assembly.Arash Abizadeh - 2021 - Perspectives on Politics 19 (3):791-806.
    The two traditional justifications for bicameralism are that a second legislative chamber serves a legislative-review function (enhancing the quality of legislation) and a balancing function (checking concentrated power and protecting minorities). I furnish here a third justification for bicameralism, with one elected chamber and the second selected by lot, as an institutional compromise between contradictory imperatives facing representative democracy: elections are a mechanism of people’s political agency and of accountability, but run counter to political equality and impartiality, and are insufficient (...)
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  26.  37
    What Makes an Effective Representation of Information: A Formal Account of Observational Advantages.Gem Stapleton, Mateja Jamnik & Atsushi Shimojima - 2017 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 26 (2):143-177.
    In order to effectively communicate information, the choice of representation is important. Ideally, a chosen representation will aid readers in making desired inferences. In this paper, we develop the theory of observation: what it means for one statement to be observable from another. Using observability, we give a formal characterization of the observational advantages of one representation of information over another. By considering observational advantages, people will be able to make better informed choices of representations of information. (...)
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  27. Representation and rule-instantiation in connectionist systems.Gary Hatfield - 1991 - In Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (eds.), Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    There is disagreement over the notion of representation in cognitive science. Many investigators equate representations with symbols, that is, with syntactically defined elements in an internal symbol system. In recent years there have been two challenges to this orthodoxy. First, a number of philosophers, including many outside the symbolist orthodoxy, have argued that "representation" should be understood in its classical sense, as denoting a "stands for" relation between representation and represented. Second, there has been a growing challenge (...)
     
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  28. Representation is Democracy.David Plotke - 1997 - Constellations 4 (1):19-34.
    During the Cold War, arguments about representation were a significant part of international debates about democracy. Proponents of minimal democracy dominated these arguments, and their thin notions of representation became political common sense. I propose a view of representation that differs from the main views advocated during the Cold War. Representation has a central positive role in democratic politics: I gain political representation when my authorized representative tries to achieve my political aims, subject to dialogue (...)
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  29. Individuation without Representation.Joe Dewhurst - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (1):103-116.
    ABSTRACT Shagrir and Sprevak explore the apparent necessity of representation for the individuation of digits in computational systems.1 1 I will first offer a response to Sprevak’s argument that does not mention Shagrir’s original formulation, which was more complex. I then extend my initial response to cover Shagrir’s argument, thus demonstrating that it is possible to individuate digits in non-representational computing mechanisms. I also consider the implications that the non-representational individuation of digits would have for the broader theory of (...)
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  30. Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited.[author unknown] - 2014
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  31.  90
    Decoding the Brain: Neural Representation and the Limits of Multivariate Pattern Analysis in Cognitive Neuroscience.J. Brendan Ritchie, David Michael Kaplan & Colin Klein - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (2):581-607.
    Since its introduction, multivariate pattern analysis, or ‘neural decoding’, has transformed the field of cognitive neuroscience. Underlying its influence is a crucial inference, which we call the decoder’s dictum: if information can be decoded from patterns of neural activity, then this provides strong evidence about what information those patterns represent. Although the dictum is a widely held and well-motivated principle in decoding research, it has received scant philosophical attention. We critically evaluate the dictum, arguing that it is false: decodability is (...)
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  32. La Représentation de l'Espacechez l'Enfant.Jean Piaget & Bärbel Inhelder - 1948 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 4 (4):440-441.
     
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  33. Models, Representation, and Mediation.Tarja Knuuttila - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1260-1271.
    Representation has been one of the main themes in the recent discussion of models. Several authors have argued for a pragmatic approach to representation that takes users and their interpretations into account. It appears to me, however, that this emphasis on representation places excessive limitations on our view of models and their epistemic value. Models should rather be thought of as epistemic artifacts through which we gain knowledge in diverse ways. Approaching models this way stresses their materiality (...)
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  34.  18
    Two modes of mental representation and problem solution in syllogistic reasoning.Marilyn Ford - 1995 - Cognition 54 (1):1-71.
    In this paper, the theory of syllogistic reasoning proposed by Johnson-Laird is shown to be inadequate and an alternative theory is put forward. Protocols of people attempting to solve syllogistic problems and explaining to another person how they reached their conclusions were obtained. Two main groups of subjects were identified. One group represented the relationship between classes in a spatial manner that was supplemented by a verbal representation. The other group used a primarily verbal representation. A detailed theory (...)
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  35. Two Notions of Mental Representation.Uriah Kriegel - 2013 - In Current Controversies in Philosophy of Mind. New York, New York: Routledge. pp. 161-179.
    The main thesis of this paper is twofold. In the first half of the paper, (§§1-2), I argue that there are two notions of mental representation, which I call objective and subjective. In the second part (§§3-7), I argue that this casts familiar tracking theories of mental representation as incomplete: while it is clear how they might account for objective representation, they at least require supplementation to account for subjective representation.
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  36. Scientific Representation and Theoretical Equivalence.James Nguyen - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):982-995.
    In this article I connect two debates in the philosophy of science: the questions of scientific representation and both model and theoretical equivalence. I argue that by paying attention to how a model is used to draw inferences about its target system, we can define a notion of theoretical equivalence that turns on whether models license the same claims about the same target systems. I briefly consider the implications of this for two questions that have recently been discussed in (...)
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  37. Representation and the mind-body problem in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 1996 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This first extensive study of Spinoza's philosophy of mind concentrates on two problems crucial to the philosopher's thoughts on the matter: the requirements for having a thought about a particular object, and the problem of the mind's relation to the body. Della Rocca contends that Spinoza's positions are systematically connected with each other and with a principle at the heart of his metaphysical system: his denial of causal or explanatory relations between the mental and the physical. In this way, Della (...)
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  38. Additive representation of separable preferences over infinite products.Marcus Pivato - 2014 - Theory and Decision 77 (1):31-83.
    Let X\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$\mathcal{X }$$\end{document} be a set of outcomes, and let I\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$\mathcal{I }$$\end{document} be an infinite indexing set. This paper shows that any separable, permutation-invariant preference order \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$$$\end{document} on XI\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$\mathcal{X }^\mathcal{I }$$\end{document} admits an additive representation. That is: there exists a linearly ordered abelian group (...)
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  39. Analog Mental Representation.Jacob Beck - forthcoming - WIREs Cognitive Science.
    Over the past 50 years, philosophers and psychologists have perennially argued for the existence of analog mental representations of one type or another. This study critically reviews a number of these arguments as they pertain to three different types of mental representation: perceptual representations, imagery representations, and numerosity representations. Along the way, careful consideration is given to the meaning of “analog” presupposed by these arguments for analog mental representation, and to open avenues for future research.
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  40.  73
    Bodily structure and body representation.Adrian J. T. Alsmith - 2019 - Synthese 198 (3):2193-2222.
    This paper is concerned with representational explanations of how one experiences and acts with one’s body as an integrated whole. On the standard view, accounts of bodily experience and action must posit a corresponding representational structure: a representation of the body as an integrated whole. The aim of this paper is to show why we should instead favour the minimal view: given the nature of the body, and representation of its parts, accounts of the structure of bodily experience (...)
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  41. Objective Similarity and Mental Representation.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):683-704.
    The claim that similarity plays a role in representation has been philosophically discredited. Psychologists, however, routinely analyse the success of mental representations for guiding behaviour in terms of a similarity between representation and the world. I provide a foundation for this practice by developing a philosophically responsible account of the relationship between similarity and representation in natural systems. I analyse similarity in terms of the existence of a suitable homomorphism between two structures. The key insight is that (...)
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  42.  11
    The representation of harmonic structure in music: Hierarchies of stability as a function of context.J. Bharucha - 1983 - Cognition 13 (1):63-102.
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  43. Representation, similarity, and the chorus of prototypes.Shimon Edelman - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (1):45-68.
    It is proposed to conceive of representation as an emergent phenomenon that is supervenient on patterns of activity of coarsely tuned and highly redundant feature detectors. The computational underpinnings of the outlined concept of representation are (1) the properties of collections of overlapping graded receptive fields, as in the biological perceptual systems that exhibit hyperacuity-level performance, and (2) the sufficiency of a set of proximal distances between stimulus representations for the recovery of the corresponding distal contrasts between stimuli, (...)
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  44. Decoding the Brain: Neural Representation and the Limits of Multivariate Pattern Analysis in Cognitive Neuroscience.J. Brendan Ritchie, David Michael Kaplan & Colin Klein - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx023.
    Since its introduction, multivariate pattern analysis, or ‘neural decoding’, has transformed the field of cognitive neuroscience. Underlying its influence is a crucial inference, which we call the decoder’s dictum: if information can be decoded from patterns of neural activity, then this provides strong evidence about what information those patterns represent. Although the dictum is a widely held and well-motivated principle in decoding research, it has received scant philosophical attention. We critically evaluate the dictum, arguing that it is false: decodability is (...)
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  45.  35
    Natural self-interest, interactive representation, and the emergence of objects and Umwelt.Tommi Vehkavaara - 2003 - Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):547-586.
    In biosemiotics, life and living phenomena are described by means of originally anthropomorphic semiotic concepts. This can be justified if we can show that living systems as self-maintaining far from equilibrium systems create and update some kind of representation about the conditions of their self-maintenance. The point of view is the one of semiotic realism where signs and representations are considered as real and objective natural phenomena without any reference to the specifically human interpreter. It is argued that the (...)
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  46.  16
    Symbolic Representation. Semiotic Considerations on Holistic Interview Techniques in Sociology.Jeff Bernard - 1990 - Semiotics:1-11.
  47.  34
    The Concept of Representation.D. A. Lloyd Thomas - 1969 - Philosophical Quarterly 19 (75):186-187.
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  48.  27
    Representation, Representativeness, and Non-Representational Art.Charles Altieri - 2000 - In Ananta Charana Sukla (ed.), Art and Representation: Contributions to Contemporary Aesthetics. Westport, CT, USA: Praeger. pp. 243.
  49. Completeness and representation theorem for epistemic states in first-order predicate calculus.Serge Lapierre & François Lepage - 1999 - Logica Trianguli 3:85-109.
    The aim of this paper is to present a strongly complete first order functional predicate calculus generalized to models containing not only ordinary classical total functions but also arbitrary partial functions. The completeness proof follows Henkin’s approach, but instead of using maximally consistent sets, we define saturated deductively closed consistent sets . This provides not only a completeness theorem but a representation theorem: any SDCCS defines a canonical model which determine a unique partial value for every predicate symbol and (...)
     
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  50.  22
    Extension Properties and Subdirect Representation in Abstract Algebraic Logic.Tomáš Lávička & Carles Noguera - 2018 - Studia Logica 106 (6):1065-1095.
    This paper continues the investigation, started in Lávička and Noguera : 521–551, 2017), of infinitary propositional logics from the perspective of their algebraic completeness and filter extension properties in abstract algebraic logic. If follows from the Lindenbaum Lemma used in standard proofs of algebraic completeness that, in every finitary logic, intersection-prime theories form a basis of the closure system of all theories. In this article we consider the open problem of whether these properties can be transferred to lattices of filters (...)
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