Results for 'professional integrity of scientists'

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  1.  43
    Using Ethical Reasoning to Amplify the Reach and Resonance of Professional Codes of Conduct in Training Big Data Scientists.Rochelle E. Tractenberg, Andrew J. Russell, Gregory J. Morgan, Kevin T. FitzGerald, Jeff Collmann, Lee Vinsel, Michael Steinmann & Lisa M. Dolling - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1485-1507.
    The use of Big Data—however the term is defined—involves a wide array of issues and stakeholders, thereby increasing numbers of complex decisions around issues including data acquisition, use, and sharing. Big Data is becoming a significant component of practice in an ever-increasing range of disciplines; however, since it is not a coherent “discipline” itself, specific codes of conduct for Big Data users and researchers do not exist. While many institutions have created, or will create, training opportunities to prepare people to (...)
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  2.  16
    Training the Next Generation of Scientists About Broader Impacts.Bruce J. MacFadden - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):239-248.
    Despite societal expectations that graduate students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines integrate broader impacts into their professional activities, few of them actually receive any formal training in this area. This paper describes a graduate seminar entitled “Broader Impacts of Natural Sciences on Society” taught at the University of Florida in 2006 and 2008. In addition to course goals, recruitment, expectations, format, content, and outcomes, this paper describes challenges and recommendations for others who might want to teach (...)
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  3.  3
    Utilizing Facebook for professional integration of three ethnic groups in Israel.Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet & Avraham Weic - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-19.
    This study proposes a conceptual model for utilization of Facebook for professional integration of ethnic minorities, based on the social capital and weak social ties theories. In particular, the research focuses on differences among ethnic groups of Facebook users in their willingness to create intergroup work relations and its various influence factors. A designated questionnaire was composed and administered to 120 subjects from three ethnic groups in Israel: Jewish, Muslim-Arab and Druze. We found that the proportion of intergroup (...) relations was higher on Facebook than in the offline workspace in all three groups. There were numerous differences between the three examined groups: self-disclosure was significantly higher for Druze and Jewish users than for the Arab users, while the willingness to create intergroup professional connections was much higher for the two minorities than for the Jewish users. This study contributes to understanding the factors that influence social network behaviour of different ethnic groups. Our results indicate that social networking sites can catalyse creation of intergroup professional relations. Utilization of social networking sites as a platform for professional promotion might constitute a first step in the process of professional and cultural integration of minorities in the ethnically heterogeneous society. (shrink)
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  4. Religious Ritual in a Scientific Space: Festival Participation and the Integration of Outsiders.Robert M. Geraci - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (6):965-993.
    An ethnographic approach to the South Indian festival Ayudha Puja reveals that the celebration plays a role in the construction of scientific communities. Ayudha Puja has the ability to absorb westerners, non-Hindus, and non-Brahmins into Indian science and engineering communities and is thus widely practiced in South Indian industry and academia. The practice of Ayudha Puja thus parallels what M. N. Srinivas labels “Sanskritization.” Within India, the process of Sanskritization refers to the adoption of high-caste habits and diet by upwardly (...)
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  5.  42
    How Should We Foster the Professional Integrity of Engineers in Japan? A Pride-Based Approach.Tetsuji Iseda - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):165-176.
    I discuss the predicament that engineering-ethics education in Japan now faces and propose a solution to this. The predicament is professional motivation, i.e., the problem of how to motivate engineering students to maintain their professional integrity. The special professional responsibilities of engineers are often explained either as an implicit social contract between the profession and society (the “social-contract” view), or as requirements for membership in the profession (the “membership-requirement” view). However, there are empirical data that suggest (...)
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  6.  59
    The Professionalization of Science Studies: Cutting Some Slack. [REVIEW]David L. Hull - 2000 - Biology and Philosophy 15 (1):61-91.
    During the past hundred years or so, those scholars studying science have isolated themselves as much as possible from scientists as well as from workers in other disciplines who study science. The result of this effort is history of science, philosophy of science and sociology of science as separate disciplines. I argue in this paper that now is the time for these disciplinary boundaries to be lowered or at least made more permeable so that a unified discipline of Science (...)
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  7.  45
    Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research Integrity: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro. 31 May - 3 June 2015.Lex Bouter, Melissa S. Anderson, Ana Marusic, Sabine Kleinert, Susan Zimmerman, Paulo S. L. Beirão, Laura Beranzoli, Giuseppe Di Capua, Silvia Peppoloni, Maria Betânia de Freitas Marques, Adriana Sousa, Claudia Rech, Torunn Ellefsen, Adele Flakke Johannessen, Jacob Holen, Raymond Tait, Jillon Van der Wall, John Chibnall, James M. DuBois, Farida Lada, Jigisha Patel, Stephanie Harriman, Leila Posenato Garcia, Adriana Nascimento Sousa, Cláudia Maria Correia Borges Rech, Oliveira Patrocínio, Raphaela Dias Fernandes, Laressa Lima Amâncio, Anja Gillis, David Gallacher, David Malwitz, Tom Lavrijssen, Mariusz Lubomirski, Malini Dasgupta, Katie Speanburg, Elizabeth C. Moylan, Maria K. Kowalczuk, Nikolas Offenhauser, Markus Feufel, Niklas Keller, Volker Bähr, Diego Oliveira Guedes, Douglas Leonardo Gomes Filho, Vincent Larivière, Rodrigo Costas, Daniele Fanelli, Mark William Neff, Aline Carolina de Oliveira Machado Prata, Limbanazo Matandika, Sonia Maria Ramos de Vasconcelos & Karina de A. Rocha - 2016 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 1 (Suppl 1).
    Table of contentsI1 Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research IntegrityConcurrent Sessions:1. Countries' systems and policies to foster research integrityCS01.1 Second time around: Implementing and embedding a review of responsible conduct of research policy and practice in an Australian research-intensive universitySusan Patricia O'BrienCS01.2 Measures to promote research integrity in a university: the case of an Asian universityDanny Chan, Frederick Leung2. Examples of research integrity education programmes in different countriesCS02.1 Development of a state-run “cyber education program of research (...)
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  8.  6
    Ranking Major and Minor Research Misbehaviors: Results From a Survey Among Participants of Four World Conferences on Research Integrity.Gerben ter Riet, Brian C. Martinson, Nils Axelsen, Joeri Tijdink & Lex M. Bouter - 2016 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 1 (1).
    BackgroundCodes of conduct mainly focus on research misconduct that takes the form of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. However, at the aggregate level, lesser forms of research misbehavior may be more important due to their much higher prevalence. Little is known about what the most frequent research misbehaviors are and what their impact is if they occur.MethodsA survey was conducted among 1353 attendees of international research integrity conferences. They were asked to score 60 research misbehaviors according to their views on (...)
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  9.  11
    Professional Responsibilities of Biomedical Scientists in Public Discourse.P. S. Copland - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):61-62.
    Minorities who disagree with the “scientific consensus” must be allowed to air their viewsI will begin by discussing the example used in Schüklenk’s paper1 of the self proclaimed “HIV dissidents” and then discuss whether the recommendations made are useful and could be applied to other examples in science.Schüklenk’s primary concern according to his title is with the professional responsibilities of biomedical scientists engaging in public discourse. The example given is of the effect that self proclaimed HIV dissidents have (...)
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  10.  20
    Professional Responsibilities of Biomedical Scientists in Public Discourse.Udo Schuklenk - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):53-60.
    This article describes how a small but vocal group of biomedical scientists propagates the views that either HIV is not the cause of AIDS, or that it does not exist at all. When these views were rejected by mainstream science, this group took its views and arguments into the public domain, actively campaigning via newspapers, radio, and television to make its views known to the lay public. I describe some of the harmful consequences of the group's activities, and ask (...)
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  11.  25
    Problem-Based Learning for Professionalism and Scientific Integrity Training of Biomedical Graduate Students: Process Evaluation.N. L. Jones, A. M. Peiffer, A. Lambros & J. C. Eldridge - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):620-626.
    Objective We conducted a process evaluation to (a) assess the effectiveness of a new problem-based learning curriculum designed to teach professionalism and scientific integrity to biomedical graduate students and (b) modify the course to enhance its relevance and effectiveness. The content presented realistic cases and issues in the practice of science, to promote skill development and to acculturate students to professional norms of science. Method We used 5-step Likert-scaled questions, open-ended questions, and interviews of students and facilitators to (...)
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  12. Social Entrepreneurs in Lebanon: An Exploratory Study of Women Entrepreneurs Engaged in the Professional Integration of Low-Skilled Women.Inaya Wahidi & Typhaine Lebegue - 2017 - EUREKA: Social and Humanities 1:36-46.
    In a country like Lebanon, where the participation rate of women in the labor force is low, around 24 % in 2014 [1], women social entrepreneurs try to alleviate this problem by targeting Low-skilled women. Our exploratory study aims to identify the motivations of six women social entrepreneurs. These entrepreneurs perceive that low-skilled women need to be reintegrated into society and suffer from gender discrimination at hiring in Lebanon. They also have personal experience that has sparked their interest in the (...)
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  13.  61
    Professional Integrity and Global Budgeting: A Study of Physician Gatekeeping in the British National Health Service.Robert Baker - 1993 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 2 (1/2):3-34.
  14. Application of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Training in the Physical Sciences and Engineering.Vykinta Kligyte, Richard T. Marcy, Ethan P. Waples, Sydney T. Sevier, Elaine S. Godfrey, Michael D. Mumford & Dean F. Hougen - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):251-278.
    Integrity is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of research organizations in terms of producing high quality research and educating the new generation of scientists. A number of responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs have been developed to address this growing organizational concern. However, in spite of a significant body of research in ethics training, it is still unknown which approach has the highest potential to enhance researchers’ integrity. One of the approaches showing some promise in (...)
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  15.  40
    Biological Complexity and Integrative Pluralism.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This fine collection of essays by a leading philosopher of science presents a defence of integrative pluralism as the best description for the complexity of scientific inquiry today. The tendency of some scientists to unify science by reducing all theories to a few fundamental laws of the most basic particles that populate our universe is ill-suited to the biological sciences, which study multi-component, multi-level, evolved complex systems. This integrative pluralism is the most efficient way to understand the different and (...)
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  16. What Is Professional Integrity?Andreas Eriksen - 2015 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 9 (2):3-17.
    What is professional integrity and what makes it so important? Policies are designed to promote it and decisions are justified in its name. This paper identifies two competing conceptions of professional integrity and argues that, on their own, both are deficient. In response, this paper develops a third, interpretive view, in which professional integrity is conceived as the virtue of being good on the word of the practice. Professions ask for the public’s trust and (...)
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  17. Roles for Scientific Societies in Promoting Integrity in Publication Ethics.Addeane S. Caelleigh - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):221-241.
    Scientific societies can have a powerful influence on the professional lives of scientists. Using this influence, they have a responsibility to make long-term commitments and investments in promoting integrity in publication, just as in other areas of research ethics. Concepts that can inform the thinking and activities of scientific societies with regard to publication ethics are: the “hidden curriculum” (the message of actions rather than formal statements), a fresh look at the components of acting with integrity, (...)
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  18.  32
    The Integration of Liberal and Professional Education.William C. McInnes - 1982 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 57 (2):205-218.
  19.  3
    Planned Integration of International Visiting Fellows and Scientists: Enhancement of Morale, Productivity, and Impact in a Laboratory Concerned with Human Diabetes and its Animal Models.A. E. Renold - 1985 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 29 (3 Pt 2):S214 - 7.
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  20.  1
    Interdisciplinary Integration of Professional Disciplines in the Process of Training Future Specialists of Socionomic Sphere.Benkovska Natalia - 2017 - Science and Education: Academic Journal of Ushynsky University 25 (5):107-111.
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  21.  2
    The Scientist and the Advertisement: Reklamegutachten in Imperial Germany.Joris Mercelis - 2020 - History of Science 58 (4):507-532.
    In late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Germany, the integration of product-evaluating certificates and reports into advertisements triggered repeated condemnations of “advertisement- Gutachten”, and scientists and science administrators introduced various restrictions to prevent the appearance of such documents. At the same time, the provision of Gutachten to private individuals and firms seemed crucial to the success of many private and public laboratories. Some chemical and other professionals, moreover, argued that the authoring and use of Reklamegutachten could represent a “scientific” and, (...)
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  22. Professional Integrity and Disobedience in the Military.Jessica Wolfendale - 2009 - Journal of Military Ethics 8 (2):127-140.
  23.  71
    Preventive Ethics, Professional Integrity, and Boundary Setting: The Clinical Management of Moral Uncertainty.Laurence B. McCullough - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):1-11.
  24.  4
    Why is Integration so Difficult? Shifting Roles of Ethics and Three Idioms for Thinking About Science, Technology and Society.Rune Nydal - 2015 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):21-36.
    Contemporary science and technology research are now expected to become more responsible through collaboration with social scientists and scholars from the humanities. This paper suggests a frame explaining why such current calls for ‘integration’ are seen as appropriate across sectors even though there are no shared understanding of how proper integration is to take place. The call for integration is understood as a response to shifting roles of ethics within research structures following shifts in modes of knowledge production. Integration (...)
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  25. [Professional Integration in a West African Urban Environment].S. Traore, E. Voland, R. I. Dunbar, C. Z. Guilmoto, K. B. Newbold, G. M. Nunez-Rocha, M. Bullen-Navarro, B. C. Castillo-Trevino, E. Solis-Perez & C. R. Duncan - 1997 - Journal of Biosocial Science 29 (3):251-65.
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  26.  6
    Generative Critique in Interdisciplinary Collaborations: From Critique in and of the Neurosciences to Socio-Technical Integration Research as a Practice of Critique in R(R)I.Mareike Smolka - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):1-19.
    Discourses on Responsible Innovation and Responsible Research and Innovation, in short RI, have revolved around but not elaborated on the notion of critique. In this article, generative critique is introduced to RI as a practice that sits in-between adversarial armchair critique and co-opted, uncritical service. How to position oneself and be positioned on this spectrum has puzzled humanities scholars and social scientists who engage in interdisciplinary collaborations with scientists, engineers, and other professionals. Recently, generative critique has been presented (...)
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  27.  9
    Value Pluralism in Research Integrity.Lex Bouter, Tamarinde Haven, Jeroen de Ridder & Rik Peels - 2019 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 4 (1).
    Both scientists and society at large have rightfully become increasingly concerned about research integrity in recent decades. In response, codes of conduct for research have been developed and elaborated. We show that these codes contain substantial pluralism. First, there is metaphysical pluralism in that codes include values, norms, and virtues. Second, there is axiological pluralism, because there are different categories of values, norms, and virtues: epistemic, moral, professional, social, and legal. Within and between these different categories, norms (...)
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  28.  17
    Teaching Ethics to Scientists and Engineers: Moral Agents and Moral Problems. [REVIEW]Dr Caroline Whitbeck - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):299-308.
    In this paper I outline an “agent-centered” approach to learning ethics. The approach is “agent-centered” in that its central aim is to prepare students toact wisely and responsibly when faced with moral problems. The methods characteristic of this approach are suitable for integrating material on professional and research ethics into technical courses, as well as for free-standing ethics courses.The analogy I draw between ethical problems and design problems clarifies the character of ethical problems as they are experienced by those (...)
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  29. Teaching Ethics to Scientists and Engineers: Moral Agents and Moral Problems.Caroline Whitbeck - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):299-308.
    In this paper I outline an “agent-centered” approach to learning ethics. The approach is “agent-centered” in that its central aim is to prepare students toact wisely and responsibly when faced with moral problems. The methods characteristic of this approach are suitable for integrating material on professional and research ethics into technical courses, as well as for free-standing ethics courses. The analogy I draw between ethical problems and design problems clarifies the character of ethical problems as they are experienced by (...)
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  30.  1
    Professional Integrity and Enhancement Technologies.F. Miller & H. Brody - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):15 - 17.
    *The opinions expressed are the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect the policy of the National Institutes of Health, the Public Health Service, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
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  31.  27
    Book ReviewsMichael S Pritchard,. Professional Integrity.Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2006. Pp. 195. $29.95.Patricia H. Werhane - 2007 - Ethics 117 (4):777-780.
  32.  24
    Gaps, Conflicts, and Consensus in the Ethics Statements of Professional Associations, Medical Groups, and Health Plans.N. D. Berkman - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):395-401.
    Background: Patients today interact with physicians, physician groups, and health plans, each of which may follow distinct ethical guidelines.Method: We systematically compared physician codes of ethics with ethics policies at physician group practices and health plans, using the 1998–99 policies of 38 organisations—18 medical associations , nine physician group practices , and 12 health plans —selected using random and stratified purposive sampling. A clinician and a social scientist independently abstracted each document, using a 397-item health care ethics taxonomy; a reconciled (...)
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  33.  16
    Professional Integrity and Screening Tests.David J. Doukas - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (4):19-21.
  34.  4
    INTeGRATIoN IN THe PRoFessIoNAl AReNA oF BUsINess.Jan Weisen - 2011 - Telos: The Destination for Nazarene Higher Education 1.
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  35.  45
    Ethical Implications in the Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources in Poland.Tadeusz Tołłoczko - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (1):63-70.
    The health care system in Poland is undergoing major change and it is possible that these changes could affect clinical research. Therefore, the situation of funding of health care is important for the future of medical research in this country. Some questions relevant in this field will be addressed. Since funds for health care and scientific research remain inadequate, their allocation raises moral, economic, legal and organisational dilemmas. The clinical aspects of resource allocation also include physicians’ responsibilities towards their patients. (...)
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  36.  6
    Professional Duties of Conscientious Objectors.Francesca Minerva - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):675-676.
    In his paper ‘The truth behind conscientious objection’ Nir Ben-Moshe develops a new approach aimed at justifying conscientious objection without relying on respect of moral integrity of the conscientious objector or tolerance towards her moral views.1 According to Ben-Moshe, the problem with justifications of CO based on moral integrity and tolerance is that ‘truth of conscience’s claims is irrelevant to their justification’. He argues, to the contrary, that whether the claims of the conscientious objector are true or false (...)
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  37. Learning Professional Ways of Being: Ambiguities of Becoming.Gloria Dall’Alba - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):34-45.
    The purpose of professional education programs is to prepare aspiring professionals for the challenges of practice within a particular profession. These programs typically seek to ensure the acquisition of necessary knowledge and skills, as well as providing opportunities for their application. While not denying the importance of knowledge and skills, this paper reconfigures professional education as a process of becoming. Learning to become a professional involves not only what we know and can do, but also who we (...)
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  38. A Code of Ethics for the Life Sciences.Nancy L. Jones - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):25-43.
    The activities of the life sciences are essential to provide solutions for the future, for both individuals and society. Society has demanded growing accountability from the scientific community as implications of life science research rise in influence and there are concerns about the credibility, integrity and motives of science. While the scientific community has responded to concerns about its integrity in part by initiating training in research integrity and the responsible conduct of research, this approach is minimal. (...)
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  39.  52
    Candor and Integrity in Science.Gerald Holton - 2005 - Synthese 145 (2):277-294.
    In the pursuit of researches and in the reporting of their results, the individual scientist as well as the community of fellow professionals rely implicitly on the researcher embracing the habit of truthfulness, a main pillar of the ethos of science. Failure to adhere to the twin imperatives of candor and integrity will be adjudged intolerable and, by virtue of science’s self-policing mechanisms, rendered the exception to the rule. Yet both as philosophical concepts and in practice, candor and (...) are complex, difficult to define clearly, and difficult to convey easily to those entering on scientific careers. Therefore it is useful to present operational examples of two major scientists who exemplified devotion to candor and integrity in scientific research. (shrink)
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  40.  23
    Cosmetic Reproductive Services and Professional Integrity.Rebecca Dresser - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):11 – 12.
  41.  14
    Moral Development and Professional Integrity.Michael S. Pritchard & Elaine E. Englehardt - 2017 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):227-240.
    We rely on doctors, accountants, engineers, and other professionals to be committed to the basic values of their professions and to exercise their ex­pertise in competent, reliable ways, even when no one is watching them do their work. That is, we expect them to have professional integrity. Children obviously do not yet have professional integrity, even if someday they will become professionals. Nevertheless, the moral development of children who will become professionals plays an important role in (...)
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  42.  7
    Health technologist in clinical laboratory’s professional training model from the integration of basic biomedical-laboratory sciences.Mercedes Caridad García González, Enrique Loret de Mola López, Rolando Miguel Bermejo Correa, José Luis Cadenas Freixas & Humberto Silvio Varela de Moya - 2018 - Humanidades Médicas 18 (2):239-257.
    RESUMEN El presente trabajo está dirigido a exponer elementos inherentes al modelo de superación profesional del tecnólogo de la salud en laboratorio clínico desde la integración ciencias básicas biomédicas-laboratorio. Entre los métodos teóricos empleados, el analítico-sintético permitió la determinación de los fundamentos epistemológicos y praxiológicos del proceso de superación, el inductivo-deductivo posibilitó la determinación de las categorías que surgen en el proceso investigativo, el sistémico estructural funcional para fundamentar el carácter de sistema del modelo y la modelación con la finalidad (...)
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  43.  14
    Social and Cultural Dynamics. Revisiting the Work of Pitirim A. Sorokin.Emiliana Mangone - 2017 - Cham, Svizzera: Springer.
    Marking the 50th anniversary of Pitirim A. Sorokin’s death, this Brief offers a critical analysis of the renowned sociologist’s theories while highlighting some of his more overlooked ones. Topics explored include cultural dynamics; the relationship between culture, society, and personality; social mobility; and the socio-cultural causality of time and space. In addition, this book updates these theories by discussing their relevance in current cultural contexts. The Brief aims to extend the work started by Sorokin on the promotion and application of (...)
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  44.  7
    A Change Laboratory Professional Development Intervention to Motivate University Teachers to Identify and Overcome Barriers to the Integration of ICT.Willy Castro Guzmán - 2018 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 19 (1):67-90.
    Change is one of the central aims of professional development for information and communication technologies integration in education. Studies on the use of ICT in education highlights the large investments in infrastructure and professional development, and the limited results in students learning. Teachers’ professional development for ICT integration in education has evolved from the development of technical skills to pedagogical skills and content-related knowledge. The gold standard and design-based approaches have dominated TDP-ICT. This study presents the Change (...)
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  45.  22
    Enhancement Technologies and Professional Integrity.Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):15 – 17.
    *The opinions expressed are the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect the policy of the National Institutes of Health, the Public Health Service, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
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  46.  8
    Moral Distress: Professional Integrity as the Basis for Taxonomies.Tessy Ann Thomas & Courtenay Rose Bruce - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):11-13.
  47.  31
    Professional Ethics in Banking and the Logic of “Integrated Situations”: Aligning Responsibilities, Recognition, and Incentives.Lisa Herzog - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (2):531-543.
    The paper develops a responsibility-based account of professional ethics in banking. From this perspective, bankers have duties not only toward clients—the traditional focus of professional ethics—but also regarding the prevention of systemic harms to whole societies. When trying to fulfill these duties, bankers have to meet three challenges: epistemic challenges, motivational challenges, and a coordination challenge. These challenges can best be met by a combination of regulation and ethics that aligns responsibilities, recognition, and incentives and creates what Parsons (...)
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  48.  6
    On Neuroeducation: Why and How to Improve Neuroscientific Literacy in Educational Professionals.Jelle Jolles & Dietsje D. Jolles - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    New findings from the neurosciences receive much interest for use in the applied field of education. For the past 15 years, neuroeducation and the application of neuroscience knowledge were seen to have promise, but there is presently some lack of progress. The present paper states that this is due to several factors. Neuromyths are still prevalent, and there is a confusion of tongues between the many neurodisciplines and the domains of behavioral and educational sciences. Second, a focus upon cognitive neuroimaging (...)
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  49.  4
    Scientists at the Bar: The Professional World of Patent Lawyers.John M. Conley & Lynn Mather - 2012 - In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. University of Chicago Press. pp. 245.
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  50.  8
    Polish Scientists in Search of a Model of the Integration of Sciences.Jan J. Sławianowski - 1975 - Dialectics and Humanism 2 (4):177-182.
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