Results for 'procreative ethics'

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  1. Unraveling the Asymmetry in Procreative Ethics.Trevor Hedberg - 2016 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 15 (2):18-21.
    The Asymmetry in procreative ethics consists of two claims. The first is that it is morally wrong to bring into existence a child who will have an abjectly miserable life; the second is that it is permissible not to bring into existence a child who will enjoy a very happy life. In this paper, I distinguish between two variations of the Asymmetry. The first is the Abstract Asymmetry, the idealized variation of the Asymmetry that many philosophers have been (...)
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  2. Procreative Ethics and the Problem of Evil.Jason Marsh - 2015 - In Sarah Hannan, Samantha Brennan & Richard Vernon (eds.), Permissible Progeny?: The Morality of Procreation and Parenting. New York, US: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 65-86.
    Many people think that the amount of evil and suffering we observe provides important and perhaps decisive evidence against the claim that a loving God created our world. Yet almost nobody worries about the ethics of human procreation. Can these attitudes be consistently maintained? This chapter argues that the most obvious attempts to justify a positive answer fail. The upshot is not that procreation is impermissible, but rather that we should either revise our beliefs about the severity of global (...)
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  3. Between Sisyphus's Rock and a Warm and Fuzzy Place: Procreative Ethics and the Meaning of Life.Rivka Weinberg - 2022 - In Iddo Landau (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Meaning in Life. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This paper suggests that there are three kinds of meaning: Everyday, Cosmic, and Ultimate. Everyday meaning refers to the value and significance in our everyday lives, including values such as beauty, morality, and truth, and the significance of engagement with them. Cosmic meaning refers to our meaningful role in the cosmos: to the significance and value of our cosmic niche, to the purposes of the cosmos and our place in it. Ultimate meaning is the end-regarding justifying reason, the valued end, (...)
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  4. Are Saviour Siblings a Special Case in Procreative Ethics?Caleb Althorpe & Elizabeth Finneron-Burns - forthcoming - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Children conceived in order to donate biological material to save the life of an already existing child are known as 'saviour siblings'. The primary reasons that have been offered against the practice are: (i) creating a saviour sibling has negative impacts on the created child and (ii) creating a saviour child represents a wrongful procreative motivation of the parents. In this paper we examine to what extent the creation of saviour siblings actually presents a special case in procreative (...)
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  5.  14
    Are Savior Siblings a Special Case in Procreative Ethics?Elizabeth Finneron-Burns & Caleb Althorpe - 2023 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 26 (1).
    In this paper we examine three categories of reasons that have been given against the creation of savior siblings (harm to the child, autonomy violations, and effects on wider society) and argue that all can be defeated. We then outline the conditions under which the practice is morally permissible and argue that these conditions are no different from those under which it is ever morally permissible to procreate. Our surprising conclusion is that savior siblings do not present a special case (...)
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  6.  23
    Book Review: Fritz Oehlschlaeger, Procreative Ethics: Philosophical and Christian Approaches to Questions at the Beginning of Life. [REVIEW]Helen Watt - 2014 - Studies in Christian Ethics 27 (1):111-114.
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  7.  8
    Book Review: Fritz Oehlschlaeger, Procreative Ethics: Philosophical and Christian Approaches to Questions at the Beginning of Life. [REVIEW]Helen Watt - 2014 - Studies in Christian Ethics 27 (1):111-114.
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  8.  33
    “You Got Me Into This…”: Procreative Responsibility and Its Implications for Suicide and Euthanasia.Rivka Weinberg - 2015 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 167-180.
    This paper investigates connections between procreative ethics and the ethics of suicide and euthanasia. While there are good reasons for distinguishing between lives worth starting and lives worth continuing, I argue that those reasons provide no reason for denying that there is a relationship between procreative and end of life ethics. Regarding euthanasia/assisted suicide, we might think it too demanding to ask parents to help euthanize their terminally ill, suffering child, but had the parents not (...)
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  9. Procreative beneficence – cui Bono?Jakob Elster - 2009 - Bioethics 25 (9):482-488.
    Recently, Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane have defended the Principle of Procreative Beneficence (PB), according to which prospective parents ought to select children with the view that their future child has ‘the best chance of the best life’. I argue that the arguments Savulescu and Kahane adduce in favour of PB equally well support what I call the Principle of General Procreative Beneficence (GPB). GPB states that couples ought to select children in view of maximizing the overall expected (...)
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  10.  13
    Procreative loss without pregnancy loss: the limitations of fetal-centric conceptions of pregnancy.Hannah Carpenter, Georgia Loutrianakis, Peyton Baker, Tiffany Bystra & Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (5):310-311.
    In their article, Romanis and Adkins delineate pregnancy loss and procreative loss to show that the former is possible without the latter, as in the case of artificial amnion and placenta technology.1 Here, we are interested in examining the reverse—procreative loss without pregnancy loss—to further tease apart these two types of loss. We discuss two cases: being forced to continue a pregnancy despite fetal demise due to abortion restrictions and choosing to selectively reduce a multifetal pregnancy. Our analysis (...)
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  11. Procreative Justice Reconceived: Shifting the Moral Gaze.Emmalon Davis - 2024 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association (First View):1-23.
    This paper reconsiders Tommie Shelby's (2016) analysis of procreation in poor black communities. I identify three conceptual frames within which Shelby situates his analysis—feminization, choice-as-control, and moralization. I argue that these frames should be rejected on conceptual, empirical, and moral grounds. As I show, this framing engenders a flawed understanding of poor black women's procreative lives. I propose an alternative framework for reconceiving the relationship between poverty and procreative justice, one oriented around reproductive flourishing instead of reproductive responsibility. (...)
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  12. Reproductive Autonomy as Self-Making: Procreative Liberty and the Practice of Ethical Subjectivity.Catherine Mills - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):639-656.
    In this article, I consider recent debates on the notion of procreative liberty, to argue that reproductive freedom can be understood as a form of positive freedom—that is, the freedom to make oneself according to various ethical and aesthetic principles or values. To make this argument, I draw on Michel Foucault’s later work on ethics. Both adopting and adapting Foucault’s notion of ethics as a practice of the self and of liberty, I argue that reproductive autonomy requires (...)
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  13. Procreative beneficence and the prospective parent.P. Herissone-Kelly - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):166-169.
    Julian Savulescu has given clear expression to a principle—that of “procreative beneficence”—which underlies the thought of many contemporary writers on bioethics. The principle of procreative beneficence holds that parents or single reproducers are at least prima facie obliged to select the child, out of a range of possible children they might have, who will be likely to lead the best life. My aim in this paper is to argue that prospective parents, just by dint of their being prospective (...)
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  14.  42
    Procreative liberty, biological connections, and motherhood.Margaret Olivia Little - 1996 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):392-396.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Procreative Liberty, Biological Connections, and MotherhoodMargaret Olivia Little (bio)Given the complex and dramatic array of issues currently facing us in reproductive ethics, bioethicists working on the topic might be forgiven feelings of trepidation when they cast their minds toward the next century. Currently, technologies such as artificial insemination by donor (AID), once the source of intense controversy, are used on a routine basis; mainstream newspapers carry advertisements (...)
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  15.  91
    Procreative Liberty, Enhancement and Commodification in the Human Cloning Debate.Sandra Shapshay - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):356-366.
    The aim of this paper is to scrutinize a contemporary standoff in the American debate over the moral permissibility of human reproductive cloning in its prospective use as a eugenic enhancement technology. I shall argue that there is some significant and under-appreciated common ground between the defenders and opponents of human cloning. Champions of the moral and legal permissibility of cloning support the technology based on the right to procreative liberty provided it were to become as safe as in (...)
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  16. Well-Being, Procreative Reasons, and Normative Background Conditions.Ramiel Tamras - forthcoming - Analysis.
    In this paper, I argue that we can get surprisingly far in vindicating common intuitions about population ethics without assuming that the well-being of those we could create gives us moral reasons for or against creating them. According to the account I sketch, rather than generating procreative reasons, facts about our potential offspring’s well-being serve as normative background conditions—they enable, disable, or modify the strength of independent reasons we might have to procreate. It is unclear whether the account (...)
     
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  17. Against procreative moral rights.Jake Earl - 2021 - Bioethics 36 (5):569-575.
    Many contemporary ethical debates turn on claims about the nature and extent of our alleged procreative moral rights: moral rights to procreate or not to procreate as we choose. In this article, I argue that there are no procreative moral rights, in that generally we do not have a distinctive moral right to procreate or not to procreate as we choose. However, interference with our procreative choices usually violates our nonprocreative moral rights, such as our moral rights (...)
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  18. On Procreative Responsibility in Assisted and Collaborative Reproduction.Melissa Seymour Fahmy - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):55-70.
    Abstract It is common practice to regard participants in assisted and collaborative reproduction (gamete donors, embryologists, fertility doctors, etc.) as simply providing a desired biological product or medical service. These agents are not procreators in the ordinary sense, nor do they stand in any kind of meaningful parental relation to the resulting offspring. This paper challenges the common view by defending a principle of procreative responsibility and then demonstrating that this standard applies as much to those who provide reproductive (...)
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  19.  60
    Balancing Procreative Autonomy and Parental Responsibility.Tom Buller & Stephanie Bauer - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):268-276.
    In Rationality and the Genetic Challenge: Making People Better? Matti Häyry provides a clear and informed discussion and analysis of a number of competing answers to the above questions. Häyry describes three main perspectives on the morality of prenatal genetic diagnosis , the “restrictive,” “moderate,” and “permissive” views, and his analysis illuminates that these views can be distinguished in terms of their different “rationalities”—their respective understanding of what counts as a reasonable choice for parents to make in light of PGD.
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  20.  75
    Coercive population policies, procreative freedom, and morality.R. Juha - 2001 - Philosophy and Geography 4 (1):67 – 77.
    I shall briefly evaluate the common claim that ethically acceptable population policies must let individuals to decide freely on the number of their children. I shall ask, first, what exactly is the relation between population policies that we find intuitively appealing, on the one hand, and population policies that maximize procreative freedom, on the other, and second, what is the relation between population policies that we tend to reject on moral grounds, on the one hand, and population policies that (...)
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  21.  43
    Parental procreative obligation and the categorisation of disease: the case of cystic fibrosis.Gabriel T. Bosslet - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):280-284.
    The advent of prenatal genetic diagnosis has sparked debates among ethicists and philosophers regarding parental responsibility towards potential offspring. Some have attempted to place moral obligations on parents to not bring about children with certain diseases in order to prevent harm to such children. There has been no rigorous evaluation of cystic fibrosis in this context. This paper will demonstrate cystic fibrosis to have unique properties that make it difficult to categorise among other diseases with the goal of promulgating a (...)
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  22. Procreative reasons-relevance: On the moral significance of why we have children.Mianna Lotz - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (5):291-299.
    Advances in reproductive technologies – in particular in genetic screening and selection – have occasioned renewed interest in the moral justifiability of the reasons that motivate the decision to have a child. The capacity to select for desired blood and tissue compatibilities has led to the much discussed 'saviour sibling' cases in which parents seek to 'have one child to save another'. Heightened interest in procreative reasons is to be welcomed, since it prompts a more general philosophical interrogation of (...)
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  23.  22
    In defence of person‐affecting procreative beneficence.Sergio Filippo Magni - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (5):473-479.
    This paper deals with the proposal of a person‐affecting version of the principle of Procreative Beneficence. Such a principle has been stated by Savulescu & Kahane in an impersonal form and balanced with a person‐affecting principle of harm to address the moral problem of the selection of future children. The paper aims to show some differences between Person‐affecting Procreative Beneficence and Savulescu & Kahane’s hybrid position, and to distinguish the former from other pro‐selection perspectives. Moreover, it explores the (...)
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  24.  17
    Unexpected Creatures: Procreative Liberty and the Frankenstein Ballet.Rosemarie Garland-Thomson - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (6):18-20.
    One of the most recent and original adaptations of Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley's Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818) is the ballet version choreographed by Liam Scarlett and performed by the Royal Ballet in 2016 and the San Francisco Ballet in 2017 and 2018. What emerges from this translation is an economical, emotionally wrenching, and visually elegant drama of family tragedy from which we can draw a cautionary tale about contemporary bioethical dilemmas in family making that new and forthcoming biomedical (...)
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  25.  41
    The Ethics of Postponed Fatherhood.Kristien Hens - 2017 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (1):103-118.
    In this paper, I review some of the discussions on procreative beneficence and procreative autonomy in the context of postponed motherhood and compare the considerations to the context of advanced paternal age. In doing so, I will give an overview of the main scientific findings with regard to how older age in men affects the health of future offspring. I shall demonstrate how the discrepancy between the media coverage and policies on postponed motherhood and postponed fatherhood mistakenly suggests (...)
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  26.  15
    Person-affecting Procreative Beneficence.Sergio Filippo Magni - 2020 - Phenomenology and Mind 19 (19):124.
    A relevant problem in reproductive ethics is the moral evaluation of selection of the possible children that the parents can have. This article discusses one of the main attempts to solve this problem, the principle of Procreative Beneficence proposed by Julian Savulescu to define a strong pro-selection perspective. According to Savulescu, such a principle has an impersonal form and is balanced with a person-affecting principle of harm. The article proposes a new person-affecting interpretation of Procreative Beneficence, distinguishing (...)
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  27.  37
    Substituted judgment, procreative beneficence, and the Ashley treatment.Thomas Douglas - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):721-722.
    It is commonly thought that when a patient is unable to make a treatment decision for herself, patient autonomy should be respected by consulting the views of a patient surrogate, normally either the next-of-kin or a person previously designated by the patient. On one view, the task of this surrogate is to make the treatment decision that the patient would have made if competent. But this so-called ‘substituted judgment standard’ (SJS) has come in for has come in for a good (...)
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  28.  47
    The principle of procreative beneficence and its implications for genetic engineering.Luvuyo Gantsho - 2022 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 43 (5):307-328.
    Molecular genetic engineering technologies such as CRISPR/Cas9 have made the accurate and safe genetic engineering of human embryos possible. Further advances in genomics have isolated genes that predict qualities and traits associated with intelligence. Given these advances, prospective parents could use these biotechnologies to genetically engineer future children for genes that enhance their intelligence. While Julian Savulescu’s Principle of Procreative Beneficence (PPB) argues for the moral obligation of prospective parents to use in-vitro fertilization and preimplantation genetic diagnosis to make (...)
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  29. Procreative permissiveness.David Benatar - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):417-418.
  30. In defence of Procreative Beneficence.J. Savulescu - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):284-288.
    Why potential parents should select the best child of possible children, and the necessity of a dialogue about the context of a reproductive decision.The principle of Procreative Beneficence is the principle of selecting the best child of the possible children one could have. This principle is elaborated on and defended against a range of objections. In particular, focus is laid on four objections that Michael Parker raises: that it is underdetermining, that it is insensitive to the complex nature of (...)
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  31.  19
    Fairness, Costs, and Procreative Justice.Gideon Elford - 2023 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 24 (2).
    A commitment to holding persons responsible for the consequences of their choices has come to find a central expression in certain popular liberal egalitarian views. However, the basis for their commitment to responsibility remains imprecisely understood. Specifically, there is a failure to distinguish between two distinct grounds for holding persons responsible for the consequences of their choices. On the one hand there is a fairness-type basis for responsibility – that an agent’s being better or worse off than others in virtue (...)
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  32.  39
    Procreative Liberty and the State's Burden of Proof in Regulating Noncoital Reproduction.John A. Robertson - 1988 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (1-2):18-26.
  33.  12
    Reproductive Technology: Towards a Theology of Procreative Stewardship, Ethics and Theology.Andrea Vicini - 2004 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 24 (2):207-210.
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  34.  26
    Creation Ethics: Reproduction, Genetics, and Quality of Life.David DeGrazia - 2012 - , US: Oxford University Press.
    Creation Ethics illuminates an array of issues in "reprogenetics" through the lens of moral philosophy. With novel frameworks for understanding prenatal moral status and human identity, David DeGrazia tackles the ethics of abortion and embryo research, genetic enhancement and prenatal genetic interventions, procreation and parenting, and obligations to future generations.
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  35. Is procreative beneficence obligatory?Ben Saunders - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):175-178.
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  36.  59
    On the partiality of procreative beneficence: a critical note.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):771-774.
    The aim of this paper is to criticise the well-discussed Principle of Procreative Beneficence (PB) lately refined by Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane. First, it is argued that advocates of PB leave us with an implausible justification for the moral partiality towards the child (or children) reproducers decide to bring into existence as compared with all other individuals. This is implausible because the reasons given in favour of the partiality of PB, which are based on practical reason and common-sense (...)
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  37. Sex selection and the procreative liberty framework.I. Melo-Martín - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
  38.  77
    Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights: Ethical and Philosophical Issues.Jaime Ahlberg & Michael Cholbi (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    _Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights_ explores important issues at the nexus of two burgeoning areas within moral and social philosophy: procreative ethics and parental rights. Surprisingly, there has been comparatively little scholarly engagement across these subdisciplinary boundaries, despite the fact that parental rights are paradigmatically ascribed to individuals responsible for procreating particular children. This collection thus aims to bring expert practitioners from these literatures into fruitful and innovative dialogue around questions at the intersection of procreation and parenthood. Among (...)
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  39.  38
    Procreative Liberty and the State's Burden of Proof in Regulating Noncoital Reproduction.John A. Robertson - 1988 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (1-2):18-26.
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  40.  51
    Response to Orr and Siegler--collective intentionality and procreative desires: the permissible view on consent to posthumous conception.M. Parker - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):389-392.
    Orr and Siegler have recently defended a restrictive view concerning posthumous sperm retrieval and conception, which would limit insemination to those cases where the deceased man has provided explicit consent for such a procedure. The restrictive view dominates current law and practice. A permissible view, in contrast, would allow insemination and conception in all but those cases where the posthumous procedure has been explicitly refused, or where there is no reasonable evidence that the deceased person desired children. I describe a (...)
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  41. Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technology—preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—has (...)
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  42.  6
    Procréation et droits de l'enfant: actes des rencontres internationales organisées les 16, 17 et 18 septembre 2003 à Marseille par l'Observatoire international du droit de la bioéthique et de la médecine [sic].Gérard Teboul (ed.) - 2004 - Bruxelles: Nemesis.
    " Procréation et droits de l'enfant " : ce thème, caractérisé par un large éventail de problématiques, se situe au cœur d'un questionnement auquel les spécialistes de la natalité sont confrontés. Alors que, notamment, des techniques nouvelles viennent perturber nos approches traditionnelles de la procréation, il importe, sans renoncer aveuglément aux innovations de la science, de rester prudent devant des évolutions scientifiques qui pourraient mettre en périt notre Humanité. On trouvera, dans le présent ouvrage, des réflexions qui - émanant d'autorités (...)
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  43.  79
    Genetic Enhancement and Procreative Autonomy.David Archard - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
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  44.  46
    He Jiankui´s gene‐editing experiment and the non‐identity problem.Marcos Alonso & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (6):563-573.
    Genetic engineering has been a topic of discussion for over 50 years, but it is only recently that gene editing has become a reality. CRISPR biotechnologies have made gene editing much safer, precise and feasible. We have witnessed the first cases of human germline genetic modification resulting in live births, conducted by He Jiankui. In this paper, we will analyse He Jiankui’s case in relation to one of the most difficult problems in procreative ethics (or the ethics (...)
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  45. Risk, Responsibility, and Procreative Asymmetries.Rivka Weinberg - 2021 - In Stephen M. Gardiner (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Intergenerational Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    The author argues for a theory of responsibility for outcomes of imposed risk, based on whether it was permissible to impose the risk. When one tries to apply this persuasive model of responsibility for outcomes of risk imposition to procreation, which is a risk imposing act, one finds that it doesn’t match one’s intuitions about responsibility for outcomes of procreative risk. This mismatch exposes a justificatory gap for procreativity, namely, that procreation cannot avail itself of the shared vulnerability to (...)
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  46.  14
    The Augustinian Legacy of the Procreative Marriage: Contemporary Implications and Alternatives.Cristina Richie - 2014 - Feminist Theology 23 (1):18-36.
    Augustine’s legacy, particularly his view of marriage as being primarily procreative and the sin of mutually desired non-procreative sex, has had a lasting impact on sexual theology and ethics in the Catholic Church. Yet indulging in the Augustinian legacy without reflection and regarding children as the end goal of marriage has led to the unchallenged assumption that children are needed in every marriage. I will examine the problematic concept of matrimony as a necessary producer of children through (...)
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  47. Wrongful Life and Procreative Decisions.Bonnie Steinbock - 2009 - In David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.), Harming Future Persons: Ethics, Genetics and the Nonidentity Problem. Springer. pp. 155--178.
  48.  36
    Review essay / Procreative liberty.Bonnie Steinbock - 1996 - Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (1):67-74.
    John Robertson, Children of Choice: Freedom and the New Reproductive Technologies Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994, 281 pp.
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  49.  74
    What is the ethics of ageing?Christopher Simon Wareham - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (2):128-132.
    Applied ethics is home to numerous productive subfields such as procreative ethics, intergenerational ethics and environmental ethics. By contrast, there is far less ethical work on ageing, and there is no boundary work that attempts to set the scope for ‘ageing ethics’ or the ‘ethics of ageing’. Yet ageing is a fundamental aspect of life; arguably even more fundamental and ubiquitous than procreation. To remedy this situation, I examine conceptions of what the (...) of ageing might mean and argue that these conceptions fail to capture the requirements of the desired subfield. The key reasons for this are, first, that they view ageing as something that happens only when one is old, thereby ignoring the fact that ageing is a process to which we are all subject, and second that the ageing person is treated as an object in ethical discourse rather than as its subject. In response to these shortcomings I put forward a better conception, one which places the ageing person at the centre of ethical analysis, has relevance not just for the elderly and provides a rich yet workable scope. While clarifying and justifying the conceptual boundaries of the subfield, the proposed scope pleasingly broadens the ethics of ageing beyond common negative associations with ageing. (shrink)
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  50.  75
    Creation Ethics: Reproduction, Genetics, and Quality of Life.David DeGrazia - 2012 - , US: Oup Usa.
    The overarching aim of this book is to illuminate a broad array of issues connected with reproduction and ethics through the lens of moral philosophy. With novel frameworks for understanding prenatal moral status and human identity, DeGrazia sheds new light on the ethics of abortion and embryo research, genetic enhancement and prenatal genetic interventions, procreation and parenting, and decisions that affect the quality of life of future generations.
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