Results for 'palliative care'

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  1. Please note that not all books mentioned on this list will be reviewed.Researching Palliative Care - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (371).
  2.  27
    Beyond the biomedical model.Palliative Care - 2005 - HEC Forum 17 (3):227-236.
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  3.  68
    Palliative care for the terminally ill in America: the consideration of QALYs, costs, and ethical issues.Y. Tony Yang & Margaret M. Mahon - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):411-416.
    The drive for cost-effective use of medical interventions has advantages, but can also be challenging in the context of end-of-life palliative treatments. A quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) provides a common currency to assess the extent of the benefits gained from a variety of interventions in terms of health-related quality of life and survival for the patient. However, since it is in the nature of end-of-life palliative care that the benefits it brings to its patients are of short duration, (...)
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  4. Palliative care ethics: a good companion.Fiona Randall - 1996 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by R. S. Downie.
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging (...)
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  5. Palliative care and new technologies. The use of smart sensor technologies and its impact on the Total Care principle.Tabea Ott, Maria Heckel, Natalie Öhl, Tobias Steigleder, Nils C. Albrecht, Christoph Ostgathe & Peter Dabrock - 2023 - BMC Palliative Care 22 (50).
    Background Palliative care is an integral part of health care, which in term has become increasingly technologized in recent decades. Lately, innovative smart sensors combined with artificial intelligence promise better diagnosis and treatment. But to date, it is unclear: how are palliative care concepts and their underlying assumptions about humans challenged by smart sensor technologies (SST) and how can care benefit from SST? -/- Aims The paper aims to identify changes and challenges in (...) care due to the use of SST. In addition, normative guiding criteria for the use of SST are developed. -/- Methods The principle of Total Care used by the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) forms the basis for the ethical analysis. Drawing on this, its underlying conceptions of the human and its socio-ethical aspects are examined with a phenomenological focus. In the second step, the advantages, limitations, and socio-ethical challenges of using SST with respect to the Total Care principle are explored. Finally, ethical-normative requirements for the application of SST are derived. -/- Results and Conclusion First, SST are limited in their measurement capabilities. Second, SST have an impact on human agency and autonomy. This concerns both the patient and the caregiver. Third, some aspects of the Total Care principle are likely to be marginalized due to the use of SST. The paper formulates normative requirements for using SST to serve human flourishing. It unfolds three criteria according to which SST must be aligned: (1) evidence and purposefulness, (2) autonomy, and (3) Total Care. (shrink)
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  6.  8
    Palliative care and ethics.Timothy E. Quill & Franklin G. Miller (eds.) - 2014 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Hospice is the premiere end of life program in the United States, but its requirement that patients forgo disease-directed therapies and that they have a prognosis of 6 months or less means that it serves less than half of dying patients and often for very short periods of time. Palliative care offers careful attention to pain and symptom management, added support for patients and families, and assistance with difficult medical decision making alongside any and all desired medical treatments, (...)
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  7.  22
    Palliative care nursing: caring for suffering patients.Kathleen Ouimet Perrin - 2023 - Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Edited by Caryn A. Sheehan, Mertie L. Potter & Mary K. Kazanowski.
    Palliative Care Nursing: Caring for Suffering Patients explores the concept of suffering as it relates to nursing practice. This text helps practicing nurses and students define and recognize various aspects of suffering across the lifespan and within various patient populations while providing guidance in alleviating suffering. In addition, it examines spiritual and ethical perspectives on suffering and discusses how witnessing suffering impacts nurses' ability to assume the professional role. Further, the authors discuss ways nurses as witnesses to suffering (...)
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  8.  30
    Palliative care versus euthanasia. The German position: The German general medical council's principles for medical care of the terminally ill.Stephan W. Sahm - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):195 – 219.
    In September 1998 the Bundesrztekammer, i.e., the German Medical Association, published new principles concerning terminal medical care. Even before publication, a draft of these principles was very controversial, and prompted intense public debate in the mass media. Despite some of the critics' suspicions that the principles prepared the way for liberalization of active euthanasia, euthanasia is unequivocally rejected in the principles. Physician-assisted suicide is considered to violate professional medical rules. In leaving aside some of the notions customarily used in (...)
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  9. From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill.Y. Michael Barilan - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):165-181.
    This paper aims at explicating a theory of hope that is also suitable for gravely ill people and based on virtue ethics, research in the psychology of “well-being,” and the philosophy of palliative care. The working hypotheses of the theory are that hope is conditioned neither by past events nor by present needs, but is not necessarily oriented toward the future, especially the distant future; that hope is related to personal agency and to freedom; and that hope is (...)
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  10.  11
    Ethical issues experienced during palliative care provision in nursing homes.Deborah H. L. Muldrew, Dorry McLaughlin & Kevin Brazil - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1848-1860.
    Background:Palliative care is acknowledged as an appropriate approach to support older people in nursing homes. Ethical issues arise from many aspects of palliative care provision in nursing homes; however, they have not been investigated in this context.Aim:To explore the ethical issues associated with palliative care in nursing homes in the United Kingdom.Design:Exploratory, sequential, mixed-methods design.Methods:Semi-structured interviews with 13 registered nurses and 10 healthcare assistants (HCAs) working in 13 nursing homes in the United Kingdom were (...)
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  11.  41
    Flemish palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation: A quantitative study.J. Gielen, S. Van den Branden, T. Van Iersel & B. Broeckaert - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):692-704.
    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses’ attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n = 415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously (...)
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  12.  47
    Palliative care for people with alzheimer's disease.Margaret M. Mahon & Jeanne M. Sorrell - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):110-120.
    The task of aligning the philosophical and clinical perspectives on ethics is a challenging one. Clinical practice informs philosophy, not merely by supplying cases, but through shaping and testing philosophical concepts in the reality of the clinical world. In this paper we explore several aspects of the relationship between the philosophical and the clinical within a framework of palliative care for people living with Alzheimer's disease. We suggest that health professionals have a moral obligation to question previous assumptions (...)
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  13.  27
    A palliative care approach in psychiatry: clinical implications.Mattias Strand, Manne Sjöstrand & Anna Lindblad - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-8.
    Background Traditionally, palliative care has focused on patients suffering from life-threatening somatic diseases such as cancer or progressive neurological disorders. In contrast, despite the often chronic, severely disabling, and potentially life-threatening nature of psychiatric disorders, there are neither palliative care units nor clinical guidelines on palliative measures for patients in psychiatry. Main text This paper contributes to the growing literature on a palliative approach in psychiatry and is based on the assumption that a change (...)
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  14.  81
    Palliative care, public health and justice: Setting priorities in resource poor countries.Craig Blinderman - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):105-110.
    Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients (...)
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  15. Palliative Care and Euthanasia.Bert Broeckaert & Rien Janssens - 2002 - Ethical Perspectives 9 (2):156-175.
    Within a period of one year, two countries have enacted laws that articulate conditions under which euthanasia and physician assisted suicide are permitted. Belgium and the Netherlands thus distinguish themselves from all other countries of the world.In Belgium, palliative care organisations have been pro-actively involved in the debate on the contents of the law, highlighting that if euthanasia can ever be justified, it is necessary to provide good palliative care for all and to include in the (...)
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  16. Part VI palliative sedation.Palliative Sedation - 2002 - In Chris Gastmans (ed.), Between Technology and Humanity: The Impact of Technology on Health Care Ethics. Leuven University Press. pp. 217.
     
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  17.  22
    Between Palliative Care and Euthanasia.Tom Mortier, René Leiva, Raphael Cohen-Almagor & Willem Lemmens - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):177-178.
    In 2002, Belgium was the second country in the world to legalize euthanasia following the Netherlands. Since then, a few studies dealing with Belgium euthanasia practices have been published that are based on a survey given to a sample of physicians and nurses . All these studies from the past decade have implicitly proposed the practice of euthanasia as a medical act. Moreover, the last article published in this journal argued that the Belgian experiment concerning medical end-of-life decisions is unique (...)
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  18.  22
    Palliative care nursing involvement in end-of-life decision-making: Qualitative secondary analysis.Pablo Hernández-Marrero, Emília Fradique & Sandra Martins Pereira - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1680-1695.
    Background: Nurses are the largest professional group in healthcare and those who make more decisions. In 2014, the Committee on Bioethics of the Council of Europe launched the “Guide on the decision-making process regarding medical treatment in end-of-life situations”, aiming at improving decision-making processes and empowering professionals in making end-of-life decisions. The Guide does not mention nurses explicitly. Objectives: To analyze the ethical principles most valued by nurses working in palliative care when making end-of-life decisions and investigate if (...)
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  19.  15
    Understanding the challenges of palliative care in everyday clinical practice: an example from a COPD action research project.Geralyn Hynes, Fiona Kavanagh, Christine Hogan, Kitty Ryan, Linda Rogers, Jenny Brosnan & David Coghlan - 2015 - Nursing Inquiry 22 (3):249-260.
    Palliative care seeks to improve the quality of life for patients suffering from the impact of life‐limiting illnesses. Palliative care encompasses but is more than end‐of‐life care, which is defined as care during the final hours/days/weeks of life. Although palliative care policies increasingly require all healthcare professionals to have at least basic or non‐specialist skills in palliative care, international evidence suggests there are difficulties in realising such policies. This study reports (...)
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  20. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care.Carl Knight & Andreas Albertsen - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (8):536-542.
    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare. We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is (...)
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  21. Palliative care within mental health.David B. Cooper & Jo Cooper (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
     
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  22.  56
    The ethics of palliative care: European perspectives.Henk ten Have & David Clark (eds.) - 2002 - Phildelphia, PA: Open University Press.
    As palliative care develops across many of the countries of Europe, we find that it continues to raise important ethical challenges. Palliative care practice requires ethical sensitivity and understanding. At the same time the very existence of palliative care calls for ethical explanation. Ethics and palliative care meet over some vital issues: 'the good death', sedation at the end of life, requests for euthanasia, futile treatment, and the role of research. Yet (...) care appears uncertain about its goals and there is evidence that its ethical underpinnings are changing. Likewise, the moral problems of palliative care are only partly served by the four 'principles' of modern bioethics. This innovative book, with contributions by clinicians, ethicists, philosophers and social scientists, provides the first ever picture of palliative care ethics in the European context. It will be of interest to those involved in the delivery and management of palliative care services, as well as to students and researchers. (shrink)
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  23.  23
    Paediatric Palliative Care during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Malaysian Perspective.Lee Ai Chong, Erwin J. Khoo, Azanna Ahmad Kamar & Hui Siu Tan - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (4):529-537.
    Malaysia had its first four patients with COVID-19 on 25 January 2020. In the same week, the World Health Organization declared it as a public health emergency of international concern. The pandemic has since challenged the ethics and practice of medicine. There is palpable tension from the conflict of interest between public health initiatives and individual’s rights. Ensuring equitable care and distribution of health resources for patients with and without COVID-19 is a recurring ethical challenge for clinicians. Palliative (...)
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  24.  4
    Ethics in palliative care: a comlete guide.Robert C. Macauley - 2018 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    A comprehensive analysis of ethical topics in palliative care, combining clinical experience and philosophical rigor. A broad array of topics are explored from historical, legal, clinical, and ethical perspectives, offering both the seasoned clinician and interested lay reader a thorough examination of the complex ethical issues facing patients suffering from life-threatening illness.
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  25.  55
    Palliative Care and the QALY Problem.Jonathan Hughes - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (4):289-301.
    Practitioners of palliative care often argue for more resources to be provided by the state in order to lessen its reliance on charitable funding and to enable the services currently provided to some of those with terminal illnesses to be provided to all who would benefit from it. However, this is hard to justify on grounds of cost-effectiveness, since it is in the nature of palliative care that the benefits it brings to its patients are of (...)
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  26.  21
    How palliative care patients’ feelings of being a burden to others can motivate a wish to die. Moral challenges in clinics and families.Heike Gudat, Kathrin Ohnsorge, Nina Streeck & Christoph Rehmann‐Sutter - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (4):421-430.
    The article explores the underlying reasons for patients’ self‐perception of being a burden (SPB) in family settings, including its impact on relationships when wishes to die (WTD) are expressed. In a prospective, interview‐based study of WTD in patients with advanced cancer and non‐cancer disease (organ failure, degenerative neurological disease, and frailty) SPB was an important emerging theme. In a sub‐analysis we examined (a) the facets of SPB, (b) correlations between SPB and WTD, and (c) SPB as a relational phenomenon. We (...)
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  27.  12
    Acknowledging vulnerability in ethics of palliative care – A feminist ethics approach.Sofia Morberg Jämterud - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):952-961.
    Patients in need of palliative care are often described as vulnerable. Being vulnerable can sometimes be interpreted as the opposite of being autonomous, if an autonomous person is seen as an independent, self-sufficient person who forms decisions independently of others. Such a dichotomous view can create a situation where one has experiences of vulnerability that cannot be reconciled with the central ethical principle of autonomy. The article presents a feminist ethical perspective on the conceptualisation of vulnerability in the (...)
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  28. The philosophy of palliative care: critique and reconstruction.Fiona Randall - 2006 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by R. S. Downie.
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
  29.  4
    Ethical Issues in Palliative Care--Reflections and Considerations: Edited by P Webb. Hochland and Hochland, 2000, pound15.95, Pp 138. ISBN 1-898507-27-9.P. Kaye - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):121-122.
    This book is a collection of essays by a variety of specialists with a particular interest in palliative care. It contains seven chapters by six different authors. The first chapter Why is the study of ethics important? is by Patricia Webb, a lecturer in palliative care with a background in nursing. She tells us that studying ethics encourages logical reasoned thinking in the face of difficult decisions such as allocation of resources, access to services, best (...), clinical research, and rights to life. Webb reminds us that clinical guidelines may not be much help in the face of an ethical dilemma with no clear right or wrong answer. The chapter called Care versus cure by David Jeffrey, a consultant in palliative medicine and writer on medical ethics, reminds us that care is concerned as much with the subjective feelings of the patient as with the physical disease, and aims …. (shrink)
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  30.  94
    Transmural palliative care by means of teleconsultation: a window of opportunities and new restrictions. [REVIEW]Jelle van Gurp, Martine van Selm, Evert van Leeuwen & Jeroen Hasselaar - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):12-.
    Background: Audio-visual teleconsultation is expected to help home-based palliative patients, hospital-based palliative care professionals, and family physicians to jointly design better, pro-active care. Consensual knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of teleconsultation in transmural palliative care is, however, largely lacking.This paper aims at describing elements of both the physical workplace and the cultural-social context of the palliative care practice, which are imperative for the use of teleconsultation technologies. Methods: A semi-structured expert meeting (...)
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  31.  56
    Evaluating palliative care: Facilitating reflexive dialgoues about an ambiguous concept. [REVIEW]Tineke A. Abma - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):261-276.
    Palliation is a relatively new concept that is used in connection with the integral care provided to those who are unable to recover from their illness. The specific meaning of the concept has not been clearly defined. This article explores the possibilities offered by a responsive approach to evaluation that can facilitate a reflexive dialogue on this ambiguous concept. In doing so it draws on a case study of a palliative care project in a Dutch health (...) authority. The article begins with an overview of the characteristics of a responsive approach to evaluation and addresses interpretative, representational and practical dilemmas. It goes on to present a series of dialogues between health professionals, informal caregivers, patients and evaluators. These dialogues take the form of juxtaposed stories, transcribed conversations and interpretations. Finally, the learning experiences are summarised and the appropriateness of the responsive approach to evaluate palliative care is discussed. (shrink)
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  32.  33
    Palliative care research: trading ethics for an evidence base.A. M. Jubb - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):342-346.
    Good medical practice requires evidence of effectiveness to address deficits in care, strive for further improvements, and justly apportion finite resources. Nevertheless, the potential of palliative care is still held back by a paucity of good evidence. These circumstances are largely attributable to perceived ethical challenges that allegedly distinguish dying patients as a special client class. In addition, practical limitations compromise the quality of evidence that can be obtained from empirical research on terminally ill subjects.This critique aims (...)
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  33.  25
    Palliative care and cancer trials.S. M. Brown - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):371-371.
    Two of the most important concepts in medicine are “curing” and “caring”. Patients should enter clinical trials with the understanding that they benefit from the treatment or that there may be some benefit to others. In many cancer trials, for example, the best that can be hoped for is a prolongation of life. Whether or not life is prolonged, we argue that there exists an obligation which can be termed a “bond of responsibility” to provide appropriate palliative care (...)
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  34.  28
    Ethical end-of-life palliative care: response to Riisfeldt.Heidi Giebel - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):51-52.
    In a recent article, 1 Riisfeldt attempts to show that the principle of double effect is unsound as an ethical principle and problematic in its application to palliative opioid and sedative use in end-of-life care. Specifically, he claims that routine, non-lethal opioid and sedative administration may be “intrinsically bad” by PDE’s standards, continuous deep palliative sedation should be treated as a bad effect akin to death for purposes of PDE, PDE cannot coherently be applied in cases where (...)
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  35.  33
    Should palliative care be a necessity or a luxury during an overwhelming health catastrophe?Philip M. Rosoff - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):312.
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  36. Palliative care registers: infringement on human rights?Rosemarie Anthony-Pillai - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):256-256.
    A personal view made in light of the recent news article regarding a husband wanting to sue Addenbrooke's hospital over a Do Not Attempt Resuscitation decision. This article aims to highlight how the rolling out of cross boundary palliative care registers may be more at risk of infringing human rights.
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  37.  9
    Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relations.Ann-Claire Larsen - 2012 - Nursing Inquiry 19 (4):334-344.
    LARSEN A‐C. Nursing Inquiry 2012; 19: 334–344 Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relationsCommunity palliative care nurses in Perth have joined the throng of healthcare workers relying on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to store, access and send client information in ‘real time’. This paper is guided by Heidegger’s approach to technologies and Habermas’ insights into the role of law in administering social welfare programs to reveal how new ethical and legal understandings regarding patient (...)
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  38. Palliative Care and the Common Good.James Bailey - 2019 - In Dan O’Brien & Peter Cataldo (eds.), Palliative Care and Catholic Health Care : Two Millennia of Caring for the Whole Person. Springer Verlag.
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  39.  67
    Burnout in palliative care: A systematic review.Sandra Martins Pereira, António M. Fonseca & Ana Sofia Carvalho - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (3):317-326.
    Burnout is a phenomenon characterized by fatigue and frustration, usually related to work stress and dedication to a cause, a way of life that does not match the person’s expectations. Although it seems to be associated with risk factors stemming from a professional environment, this problem may affect any person. Palliative care is provided in a challenging environment, where professionals often have to make demanding ethical decisions and deal with death and dying. This article reports on the findings (...)
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  40.  25
    Palliative Care and Catholic Health Care : Two Millennia of Caring for the Whole Person.Dan O’Brien & Peter Cataldo (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This book offers a comprehensive overview of the compatibility of palliative care with the vision of human dignity in the Catholic moral and theological traditions. The unique value of this book is that it presents expert analysis of the major domains of palliative care and how they are compatible with, and enhanced by, the holistic vision of the human person in Catholic health care. This volume will serve as a critically important ethical and theological resource (...)
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  41.  73
    Moral problems in palliative care practice: A qualitative study.Maaike A. Hermsen & Henk A. M. J. ten Have - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):263-272.
    Clarifying and analysing moral problems arising in the practice of palliative care was the objective of participatory observations in five palliative care settings. The results of these observations will be described in this contribution. The moral problems palliative caregivers have to deal with in their daily routines will be explained by comparison with the findings of a previously performed literature study. The specific differences in the manifestation of moral problems in the different palliative (...) settings will be highlighted as well. (shrink)
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  42.  40
    Ethical dilemmas in palliative care in traditional developing societies, with special reference to the Indian setting.S. K. Chaturvedi - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (8):611-615.
    Background: There are intriguing and challenging ethical dilemmas in the practice of palliative care in a traditional developing society.Objective: To review the different ethical issues involved in cancer and palliative care in developing countries, with special reference to India.Methods: Published literature on pain relief and palliative care in the developing countries was reviewed to identify ethical issues and dilemmas related to these, and ways in which ethical principles could be observed in delivery of (...) care in such countries are discussed.Results: The literature review revealed a number of ethical dilemmas and challenges that professionals, cancer patients and their families encountered during palliative care. It was noted that patients’ preferences and decisions are influenced by family members. Dilemmas leave the professionals and families confused about how ethical their actions have been. Specific ethical issues were noted in relation to the availability and use of oral morphine for pain relief, spiritual care, lack of adequate palliative care services, and palliative care education.Conclusions: The four principles of ethics posed difficulties in understanding the complex ethical issues in a developing country with a traditional background. Ethical issues need to be handled delicately and sensitively in palliative care settings, within the framework of the traditions and culture of the society and financial constraints. The possible role of ethics committees in palliative care settings to help decision-making needs to be studied and discussed. (shrink)
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  43.  18
    Euthanasia and palliative care in pulmonology.Е.В Яковлева & Е.А Бородулина - 2022 - Bioethics 15 (1):58-62.
    Currently, euthanasia is officially allowed only in a number of countries, in most countries, as well as in the Russian Federation, it is prohibited by law. However, in clinical practice, there are a large number of incurable patients who experience intractable pain, so the problem of euthanasia is relevant. Aim: to analyze the current state of the problem of euthanasia and palliative care in pulmonology. Material and methods: review of domestic and foreign literature on the problem of euthanasia (...)
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  44. Palliative care within mental health: ethical practice.Keith Cooper & J. Cooper (eds.) - 2018 - CRC Press.
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  45. When Palliative Care Fails to Control Suffering: Commentary.Marion D. Cooper - 1994 - Journal of Palliative Care 10:27-27.
     
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  46.  47
    CURA: A clinical ethics support instrument for caregivers in palliative care.Suzanne Metselaar, Malene van Schaik, Guy Widdershoven & H. Roeline Pasman - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (7-8):1562-1577.
    This article presents an ethics support instrument for healthcare professionals called CURA. It is designed with a focus on and together with nurses and nurse assistants in palliative care. First, we shortly go into the background and the development study of the instrument. Next, we describe the four steps CURA prescribes for ethical reflection: (1) Concentrate, (2) Unrush, (3) Reflect, and (4) Act. In order to demonstrate how CURA can structure a moral reflection among caregivers, we discuss how (...)
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  47.  8
    Building Bridges for “Palliative Care-in-Place”: Development of a mHealth Intervention for Informal Home Care.Carlos Laranjeira, Maria Anjos Dixe, Ricardo Martinho, Rui Rijo & Ana Querido - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    BackgroundIn Palliative Care, family and close people are an essential part of provision of care. They assume highly complex tasks for which they are not prepared, with considerable physical, psychological, social and economic impact. Informal Caregivers often falter in the final stage of life and develop distress, enhancing emotional burden and complicated grief. The lack of available and accessible in-person counselling resources is often reported by ICs. Online resources can promote early access to help and support for (...)
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  48.  22
    Pain Management and Palliative Care in the Era of Managed Care: Issues for Health Insurers.Diane E. Hoffmann - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):267-289.
    The problem of inadequate pain management for both terminally ill patients and patients with chronic pain has recently been documented by a number of authors and studies. A 1997 report by the Institute of Medicine, for example, states that “a significant proportion of dying patients and patients with advanced disease experience serious pain, despite the availability of effective pharmacological and other options for relieving most pain.” There are particularly impressive data that pain associated with cancer is not adequately treated.The problem (...)
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  49.  10
    Pain Management and Palliative Care in the Era of Managed Care: Issues for Health Insurers.Diane E. Hoffmann - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):267-289.
    The problem of inadequate pain management for both terminally ill patients and patients with chronic pain has recently been documented by a number of authors and studies. A 1997 report by the Institute of Medicine, for example, states that “a significant proportion of dying patients and patients with advanced disease experience serious pain, despite the availability of effective pharmacological and other options for relieving most pain.” There are particularly impressive data that pain associated with cancer is not adequately treated.The problem (...)
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  50.  2
    Palliative care: Essential concepts in the education of health professionals.Dorothy Brockopp - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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