Results for 'organ transplant supply'

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  1. Ethical Considerations in Organ Transplants.David L. Perry - manuscript
    The ability to keep someone alive by replacing one or more of their major organs is an astounding achievement of 20th-century medicine. Unfortunately, the current supply of transplant organs is much lower than the need or demand for them, which means that thousands of people die every year in the U.S. alone for lack of a replacement organ.
     
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  2.  47
    Organ Transplant Initiatives: The Twilight Zone.D. P. Price - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):170-175.
    Assessments of the acceptability of new transplantation practices require a pinpointing of not only the meaning of death, but also the timing of death. They typically perceive elective ventilation as occurring just prior to death and non-heart-beating donor protocols as operative just after death. However, such practices in fact highlight the general vagueness and ambiguity surrounding these issues in both law and ethics. Supply-side dilemmas in transplantation lend real urgency to this "life or death" debate.
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  3.  10
    Family-Based Consent to Organ Transplantation: A Cross-Cultural Exploration.Mark J. Cherry, Ruiping Fan & Kelly Kate Evans - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):521-533.
    This special thematic issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy brings together a cross-cultural set of scholars from Asia, Europe, and North America critically to explore foundational questions of familial authority and the implications of such findings for organ procurement policies designed to increase access to transplantation. The substantial disparity between the available supply of human organs and demand for organ transplantation creates significant pressure to manipulate public policy to increase organ procurement. As the articles (...)
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  4. "[Supplying Organs for Transplantation Jesse Dukeminier,] R." the Transplantation of Organs Will Be Assimilated Into Ordinary Clinical Practice... And There is No Need to Be Philosophical About It. This Will Come About for the Single and Suficient Reason That. [REVIEW]Need A. Transplant - 1984 - Bioethics Reporter 1 (1):22.
     
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  5. The Kindness of Strangers: Organ Transplantation in a Capitalist Age.Thomas Anthony Shannon - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (3):285-303.
    : The topic of organ transplantation is examined from the perspective of three authors: Robert Bellah, Jeremy Rifkin, and Margaret Jane Radin. Introduced by reflections on the development of the justification of organ transplantation within the Roman Catholic community and the various themes raised by the historical study in Richard Titmuss's The Gift Relationship, the paper examines how and in what ways the possible commodification of organs will affect our society and the impacts this may have on the (...)
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  6. Harvesting the Living?: Separating Brain Death and Organ Transplantation.Courtney S. Campbell - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):301-318.
    : The chronic shortage of transplantable organs has reached critical proportions. In the wake of this crisis, some bioethicists have argued there is sufficient public support to expand organ recovery through use of neocortical criteria of death or even pre-mortem organ retrieval. I present a typology of ways in which data gathered from the public can be misread or selectively used by bioethicists in service of an ideological or policy agenda, resulting in bad policy and bad ethics. Such (...)
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  7.  31
    Shifting Ethics: Debating the Incentive Question in Organ Transplantation.D. Joralemon - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):30-35.
    The paper reviews the discussion within transplantation medicine about the organ supply and demand problem. The focus is on the evolution of attitudes toward compensation plans from the early 1980s to the present. A vehement rejection on ethical grounds of anything but uncompensated donation—once the professional norm—has slowly been replaced by an open debate of plans that offer financial rewards to persons willing to have their organs, or the organs of deceased kin, taken for transplantation. The paper asks (...)
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  8.  39
    The Institute of Medicine on Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation.Alister Browne - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):75-86.
    The current main source of transplantable organs is from heart-beating donors. These are patients who have suffered a catastrophic brain injury, been ventilated, declared dead by neurological criteria, and had their vital functions maintained mechanically until the point of transplantation. But the demand for organs far outstrips the supply, and these patients are not the only potential donors. The idea behind non-heart-beating transplantation is to expand the donor pool by including in it patients who are in hopeless conditions but (...)
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  9.  26
    A Definition of Human Death Should Not Be Related to Organ Transplants * Commentary.C. Machado - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (3):201-202.
    Kerridge et al recently published a paper in the journal about organ transplantation and the diagnosis of death.1 Although I appreciate the authors’ efforts to present their arguments about such a controversial issue, I found some inconsistencies in this article that I would like to discussWhen Kerridge and his collaborators discussed the origins of the concept of brain death , they emphasised that after the report of the medical consultants on the diagnosis of death to the US President’s Commission (...)
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  10. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of (...)
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  11.  30
    Transfusion Contracts for Jehovah's Witnesses Receiving Organ Transplants: Ethical Necessity or Coercive Pact?K. A. Bramstedt - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):193-195.
    Jehovah’s Witnesses should be required to sign transfusion contracts in order to be eligible for transplant.Human donor organs continue to be in short supply, and many potential transplant recipients die while waiting for an allograft to become available.1 Because the organ supply is so limited and the offering of organs is based on the generosity of patients and families, proper stewardship of these organs is an ethical obligation for transplant teams, as well as (...) recipients. Preventable graft loss must be protected against, and factors that foster preventable graft loss—for example, non-compliance must be proactively contemplated when patients are reviewed as potential transplant candidates. Post-transplant treatment refusal is one example of behaviour that can compromise transplant success.JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES AS TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTSIt is widely known that one of the most significant teachings of the Jehovah’s Witness church is abstinence from receiving blood transfusions.2 Believers derive this tenet from the Bible verse: “You are to abstain from …blood”.3 While blood loss is a risk of transplant surgery, some centres do not view patient refusal of blood transfusion as a transplant exclusion criterion. The first published case of transplantation of a Jehovah’s Witness appeared in 1986 from the University of California Los Angeles heart transplant team.4 Since then, numerous other cases have been published, including liver,5 kidney,6 pancreas,6 and lung.7 For experienced centres with superior blood management skills, transplant can indeed be a surgical success; however, optimal blood management before and during surgery are only two thirds of the patient’s clinical time clock. In the remaining third, the post-transplant period, the patient has received his/her organ, yet the potential for clinical need of blood transfusion remains.THE DILEMMAWhether due to postoperative complication, or future illness or trauma, all transplant recipients have …. (shrink)
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  12.  52
    Global Initiatives to Tackle Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism.Alireza Bagheri & Francis L. Delmonico - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):887-895.
    The increasing gap between organ supply and demand has opened the door for illegal organ sale, trafficking of human organs, tissues and cells, as well as transplant tourism. Currently, underprivileged and vulnerable populations in resource-poor countries are a major source of organs for rich patient-tourists who can afford to purchase organs at home or abroad. This paper presents a summary of international initiatives, such as World Health Organization’s Principle Guidelines, The Declaration of Istanbul, Asian Task Force (...)
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  13.  44
    Recovery of Transplantable Organs After Cardiac or Circulatory Death: Transforming the Paradigm for the Ethics of Organ Donation.Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan McGregor - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:8-.
    Organ donation after cardiac or circulatory death (DCD) has been introduced to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, we argue that the recovery of viable organs useful for transplantation in DCD is not compatible with the dead donor rule and we explain the consequential ethical and legal ramifications. We also outline serious deficiencies in the current consent process for DCD with respect to disclosure of necessary elements for voluntary informed decision making and respect for the (...)
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  14.  57
    Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation.Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism, minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. Brain death does not disrupt (...)
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  15.  29
    The Supply Side of Organ Allocation.Axel Ockenfels & Joachim Weimann - 2001 - Analyse & Kritik 23 (2):280-285.
    The benefits of a large organ pool accrue not only to the actual organ recipients themselves, but to others as well due to the insurance it provides against having to wait 'too long' for an organ transplant. We argue that this public good character of a large organ pool makes it economically and ethically justifiable to design a market mechanism that boosts the number of donors. Most importantly, such a mechanism has the potential to substantially (...)
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  16.  76
    Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation: Neglected Again.Aaron Spital - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):169-174.
    : The March 2003 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal was devoted to cadaveric organ procurement. All the discussed proposals for solving the severe organ shortage place a higher value on respecting individual and/or family autonomy than on maximizing recovery of organs. Because of this emphasis on autonomy and historically high refusal rates, I believe that none of the proposals is likely to achieve the goal of ensuring an adequate supply of transplantable organs. An alternative (...)
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  17.  92
    The Morality of a Free Market for Transplant Organs.Mark T. Nelson - 1991 - Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (1):63-79.
    There is a world-wide shortage of kidneys for transplantation. Many people will have to endure lengthy and unpleasant dialysis treatments, or die before an organ becomes available. Given this chronic shortage, some doctors and health economists have proposed offering financial incentives to potential donors to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, I explore objections to the practice of buying and selling organs from the point of view 1) justice, 2) beneficence and 3) Commodification. Regarding objection (...)
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  18.  40
    Nudge, Nudge or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs.Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger, Arthur L. Caplan & Jathan Sadowski - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):32-39.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (2008) contend that mandated choice is the most practical nudge for increasing organ donation. We argue that they are wrong, and their mistake results from failing to appreciate how perceptions of meaning can influence people's responses to nudges. We favor a policy of default to donation that is subject to immediate family veto power, includes options for people to opt out (and be educated on how to do so), and emphasizes the role of (...) procurement organizations and in-house transplant donation coordinators creating better environments for increasing the supply of organs and tissues obtained from cadavers. This policy will provide better opportunities for offering nudges in contexts where in-house coordinators work with families. We conclude by arguing that nudges can be introduced ethically and effectively into these contexts only if nudge designers collaborate with in-house coordinators and stakeholders. (shrink)
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  19. Should Convicted Criminals Receive Heart Transplants?David Perry - 2002 - Santa Clara Magazine (Fall).
    According to the United Network for Organ Sharing http://www.unos.org), over 4,100 Americans are currently candidates for heart transplants, meaning that they desperately need them, they satisfy the criteria for "medical utility" (i.e., a transplant will probably keep them alive), and they have adequate insurance or other funding to cover their cost. Unfortunately the supply of hearts in this country doesn't even come close to meeting the demand: only 2,202 heart transplants were performed last year. Thus, every day (...)
     
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  20.  45
    Organ Markets and the Ends of Medicine.F. D. Davis & S. J. Crowe - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (6):586-605.
    As the gap between the need for and supply of human organs continues to widen, the aim of securing additional sources of these “gifts of the body” has become a seemingly overriding moral imperative, one that could—and some argue, should—override the widespread ban on organ markets. As a medical practice, organ transplantation entails the inherent risk that one human being, a donor, will become little more than a means to the end of healing for another human being (...)
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  21.  37
    Is the Use of Animal Organs for Transplants Morally Acceptable?: Debates Over the Use of Animals in Xenotransplantation.Rui-Peng Lei - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 5:49-61.
    As a first step, the arguments for and against the use of animals for medical purposes in general were reviewed. These arguments are summarized briefly in the first part of the article; Secondly, even if people accept in principle the use of animals in medicine and medical research, their use in xenotransplantation mayraise particular difficulties. There are three key issues in the debate over the use of animals in xenotransplantation. The first is whether as a matter of principle, it is (...)
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  22.  28
    Child Organ Trafficking: Global Reality and Inadequate International Response.Alireza Bagheri - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):239-246.
    In organ transplantation, the demand for human organs has grown far faster than the supply of organs. This has opened the door for illegal organ trade and trafficking including from children. Organized crime groups and individual organ brokers exploit the situation and, as a result, black markets are becoming more numerous and organized organ trafficking is expanding worldwide. While underprivileged and vulnerable men and women in developing countries are a major source of trafficked organs, and (...)
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  23.  26
    Closing the Organ Gap: A Reciprocity-Based Social Contract Approach.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):415-423.
    Organ transplantation has become a proven, cost-effective lifesaving treatment, but its promise is contingent on the number of available organs. The growing gap between the demand and supply results in unnecessary loss and diminished quality of life as well as high costs for surviving patients and health insurers. Twenty years after the enactment of the National Organ Transplantation Act, it is time to rethink the moral basis and overall design of organ transplantation policy. We propose a (...)
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  24.  30
    Kidney Transplant Tourism: Cases From Canada.L. Wright, J. S. Zaltzman, J. Gill & G. V. R. Prasad - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):921-924.
    Canada has a marked shortfall between the supply and demand for kidneys for transplantation. Median wait times for deceased donor kidney transplantation vary from 5.8 years in British Columbia, 5.2 years in Manitoba and 4.5 years in Ontario to a little over 2 years in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Living donation provides a viable option for some, but not all people. Consequently, a small number of people travel abroad to undergo kidney transplantation by commercial means. The extent to which (...)
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  25.  23
    In Defense of the Reverence of All Life: Heideggerean Dissolution of the Ethical Challenges of Organ Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death. [REVIEW]D. J. Isch - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):441-459.
    During the past 50 years since the first successful organ transplant, waiting lists of potential organ recipients have expanded exponentially as supply and demand have been on a collision course. The recovery of organs from patients with circulatory determination of death is one of several effective alternative approaches recommended to reduce the supply-and-demand gap. However, renewed debate ensues regarding the ethical management of the overarching risks, pressures, challenges and conflicts of interest inherent in organ (...)
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  26.  20
    Opt‐in or Opt‐Out to Increase Organ Donation in South Africa? Appraising Proposed Strategies Using an Empirical Ethics Analysis.Harriet Etheredge, Claire Penn & Jennifer Watermeyer - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (2):119-125.
    Utilising empirical ethics analysis, we evaluate the merits of systems proposed to increase deceased organ donation in South Africa. We conclude that SA should maintain its soft opt-in policy, and enhance it with ‘required transplant referral’ in order to maximise donor numbers within an ethically and legally acceptable framework. In SA, as is the case worldwide, the demand for donor organs far exceeds the supply thereof. Currently utilising a soft opt-in system, SA faces the challenge of how (...)
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  27.  12
    Transplants Save Lives, Defending the Double Veto Does Not: A Reply to Wilkinson.A. J. Cronin - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):219-220.
    Wilkinson’s discussion of the individual and family consent to organ and tissue donation is to be welcomed because it draws attention to the “incoherent hybrid” of the current position.1 I wish to highlight some areas of his discussion and propose that, in a situation of posthumous organ and tissue donation, the cadaver has no individual rights and family rights should under no circumstances automatically outweigh the potential transplant recipients’ right to a life-saving treatment.Transplant immunobiology and clinical (...)
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  28. Altruism or Solidarity? The Motives for Organ Donation and Two Proposals.Ben Saunders - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (7):376-381.
    Proposals for increasing organ donation are often rejected as incompatible with altruistic motivation on the part of donors. This paper questions, on conceptual grounds, whether most organ donors really are altruistic. If we distinguish between altruism and solidarity – a more restricted form of other-concern, limited to members of a particular group – then most organ donors exhibit solidarity, rather than altruism. If organ donation really must be altruistic, then we have reasons to worry about the (...)
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  29.  8
    Building Norms for Organ Donation in China: Pitfalls and Challenges.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):640-662.
    In most, if not all, jurisdictions with active organ transplantation programs, there is a persistent desire to increase donation rates because the demand for transplantable organs exceeds the supply. China, in particular, faces an extraordinary gap between the number of organs donated by deceased donors and the number of people seeking one or more transplants. China might look to Western countries with higher donation rates to determine how best to introduce Western practices into the Chinese system. In attempting (...)
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  30.  18
    Children Sold for Transplants: Medical and Legal Aspects.U. Fasting, J. Christensen & S. Glending - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (6):518-526.
    Over the last few decades there has been a substantially higher percentage of successful organ transplants but also a significant imbalance between the demand for and the supply of organs, creating the basis for a highly profitable black market trade in human organs. Sometimes there are reports that children have been kidnapped, only to reappear later lacking one kidney, or that they simply disappear and are subsequently killed to have all their transplantable organs removed for profit. The European (...)
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  31.  21
    Why a Market in Organs is Inevitably Unethical.Alastair V. Campbell - 2016 - Asian Bioethics Review 8 (3):164-176.
    In this paper I shall be arguing against the claim made by Erin and Harris and others, that creating a “regulated market” in organs for transplantation taken from living vendors is both viable practically and a moral imperative. No-one can doubt that there is currently a crisis in the provision of organs for transplantation, with a massive gap between supply and demand. There are a number of reasons for this crisis. Since its development as a life-saving measure in the (...)
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  32.  38
    Transplantation Ethics: Old Questions, New Answers?Michael Devita, Mark P. Aulisio & Thomas May - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):357-360.
    The first reported successful kidney transplantation occurred in 1954, between twins. Since then, organ donation and transplantation has become less a medical marvel than a common expectation of patients with a variety of diseases resulting in organ failure. Those expectations have caused demand for organs to skyrocket far beyond available supply, fueling an organ shortage and resulting in over 60,000 patients on transplant waiting lists. In this special issue, our contributors attempt to shed new light (...)
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  33.  8
    Remapping the Organ Donation Ethical Climate: A Care Ethics Consideration.Hui Yun Chan - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):295-308.
    Organ donation has gained much attention as the need for transplant exceeds the supply of organs. Various proposals have been put forward to address the organ shortage challenge, ranging from offering incentives to donors, addressing family refusals to donations and instituting presumed consent laws. Presumed consent as the favoured approach has not been universally effective in increasing actual transplants despite its appeal. Few considerations have been given to the broader ethical climate influencing the organ donation (...)
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  34.  3
    Should Compensation for Organ Donation Be Allowed?Arthur Caplan & Rosamond Rhodes - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):286-296.
    The need for organs to transplant is clear. Due to the lack of transplants, people suffer, they die, and the cost of taking care of them until they die is huge. There is general agreement that it would be good to increase the supply of organs in order to meet the demand for organ transplantation.
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  35. The Failure to Give: Reducing Barriers to Organ Donation.James F. Childress - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (1):1-16.
    : Moral frameworks for evaluating non-donation strategies to increase the supply of cadaveric human organs for transplantation and ways to overcome barriers to organ donation are explored. Organ transplantation is a very complex area, because the human body evokes various beliefs, symbols, sentiments, and emotions as well as various rituals and social practices. From a rationalistic standpoint, some policies to increase the supply of transplantable organs may appear to be quite defensible but then turn out to (...)
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  36.  45
    The Shortage of Human Organs: Causes, Consequences and Remedies.Friedrich Breyer & Hartmut Kliemt - 2007 - Analyse & Kritik 29 (2):188-205.
    There is an ever increasing shortage of human organ transplants in Germany. This paper aims at understanding the reasons for that shortage better and then discusses various ways to overcome it. After estimating the potential supply of donor organs it is discussed why actual supply remains far below potential supply. Insufficient reimbursement for hospitals, a lack of incentives to donate, and mistaken donation rules are diagnosed to cause the shortage. Thus, organ shortage is due not (...)
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  37.  75
    Public Policy, Public Opinion, and Consent for Organ Donation.Laura A. Siminoff & Mary Beth Mercer - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):377-386.
    Medical advances in transplantation techniques have driven an exponential increase in the demand for transplantable organs. Unfortunately, policy efforts to bolster the organ supply have been less than effective, failing to provide a stopgap for ever-increasing numbers of patients who await organ transplantation. The number of registrations on waiting lists exceeded 65,245 in early 1999, a 325% increase over the 20,000 that existed 11 years earlier in 1988. Regrettably, more than 4,000 patients die each year while awaiting (...)
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  38.  5
    The Obstacles to Organ Donation Following Brain Death in Iran: A Qualitative Study.Parvin Abbasi, Javad Yoosefi Lebni, Paricher Nouri, Arash Ziapour & Amir Jalali - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundOrgan donation following brain death has become an important way of supplying organs for transplantation in many countries. This practice is less common in Iran for different reasons. Therefore, this study aims to explore the obstacles to organ donation following brain death in Iran.MethodsThis qualitative research was conducted following the conventional content analysis method. The study population consisted of individuals with a history of brain death among their blood relatives who refused to donate the organs. Snowball sampling was employed (...)
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  39.  51
    Non-Heart Beating Organ Donation: Old Procurement Strategy--New Ethical Problems.M. D. D. Bell - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (3):176-181.
    The imbalance between supply of organs for transplantation and demand for them is widening. Although the current international drive to re-establish procurement via non-heart beating organ donation/donor is founded therefore on necessity, the process may constitute a desirable outcome for patient and family when progression to brain stem death does not occur and conventional organ retrieval from the beating heart donor is thereby prevented. The literature accounts of this practice, however, raise concerns that risk jeopardising professional and (...)
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  40.  9
    Ethical Issues Relating to Renal Transplantation From Prediabetic Living Donor.Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo, Edith Valdez-Martínez & Miguel Bedolla - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):45.
    In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end − stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to (...)
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  41.  63
    Three Views of Organ Procurement Policy: Moving Ahead or Giving Up?Jeffrey P. Kahn - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (1):45-50.
    : The supply of organs for transplant remains inadequate to meet the needs of waiting patients, in spite of many programs and approaches to increase rates of donation. Over the years there have been numerous proposals to introduce schemes that would move toward the outright sale of organs. Three articles in this issue of the Journal propose methods for increasing organ supply—two by moving toward a market approach and the third by advocating a change in social (...)
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  42.  5
    Ethics of Organ Procurement From the Unrepresented Patient Population.Joseph A. Raho, Katherine Brown-Saltzman, Stanley G. Korenman, Fredda Weiss, David Orentlicher, James A. Lin, Elisa A. Moreno, Kikanza Nuri-Robins, Andrea Stein, Karen E. Schnell, Allison L. Diamant & Irwin K. Weiss - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):751-754.
    The shortage of organs for transplantation by its nature prompts ethical dilemmas. For example, although there is an imperative to save human life and reduce suffering by maximising the supply of vital organs, there is an equally important obligation to ensure that the process by which we increase the supply respects the rights of all stakeholders. In a relatively unexamined practice in the USA, organs are procured from unrepresented decedents without their express consent. Unrepresented decedents have no known (...)
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  43.  9
    Deceased Organ Transplantation in Bangladesh: The Dynamics of Bioethics, Religion and Culture.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2022 - HEC Forum 34 (2):139-167.
    Organ transplantation from living related donors in Bangladesh first began in October 1982, and became commonplace in 1988. Cornea transplantation from posthumous donors began in 1984 and living related liver and bone marrow donor transplantation began in 2010 and 2014 respectively. The Human Organ Transplantation Act officially came into effect in Bangladesh on 13th April 1999, allowing organ donation from both brain-dead and related living donors for transplantation. Before the legislation, religious leaders issued fatwa, or religious rulings, (...)
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  44.  3
    Could the Organ Shortage Ever Be Met?Mairi Levitt - 2015 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 11 (1).
    The organ shortage is commonly presented as having a clear solution, increase the number of organs donated and the problem will be solved. In the light of the Northern Ireland Assembly’s consultation on moving to an opt-out organ donor register this article focusses on the social factors and complexities which impact strongly on both the supply of, and demand for, transplantable organs. Judging by the experience of other countries presumed consent systems may or may not increase donations (...)
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  45.  32
    How to Reverse the Organ Shortage.Simon Rippon - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (4):344-358.
    Thousands of lives are lost each year because of a lack of organs available for transplant, but currently, in the UK and many other countries, organs cannot be taken from a deceased donor without explicit consent from the donor or his or her relatives. Switching to an ‘opt‐out’ system for organ donation could substantially increase the supply of organs, and save many lives. However, it has been argued in some quarters that there are serious ethical objections to (...)
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  46.  67
    Organ Transplantation and Personal Identity: How Does Loss and Change of Organs Affect the Self?F. Svenaeus - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):139-158.
    In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation experienced through (...)
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  47.  32
    A Human Rights Approach to Human Trafficking for Organ Removal.Debra Budiani-Saberi & Seán Columb - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):897-914.
    Human trafficking for organ removal (HTOR) should not be reduced to a problem of supply and demand of organs for transplantation, a problem of organized crime and criminal justice, or a problem of voiceless, abandoned victims. Rather, HTOR is at once an egregious human rights abuse and a form of human trafficking. As such, it demands a human-rights based approach in analysis and response to this problem, placing the victim at the center of initiatives to combat this phenomenon. (...)
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  48. Normative Consent and Opt-Out Organ Donation.B. Saunders - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):84-87.
    One way of increasing the supply of organs available for transplant would be to switch to an opt-out system of donor registration. This is typically assumed to operate on the basis of presumed consent, but this faces the objection that not all of those who fail to opt out would actually consent to the use of their cadaveric organs. This paper defuses this objection, arguing that people's actual, explicit or implicit, consent to use their organs is not needed. (...)
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  49.  1
    Organ Transplantation in Nepal: Ethical, Legal, and Practical Issues.Alok Atreya, Manish Upreti, Ritesh George Menezes, Ambika Dawadi & Nuwadatta Subedi - forthcoming - Wiley: Developing World Bioethics.
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    Organ Transplantation and Meaning of Life: The Quest for Self Fulfilment. [REVIEW]Jacques Quintin - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):565-574.
    Today, the frequency and the rate of success resulting from advances in medicine have made organ transplantations an everyday occurrence. Still, organ transplantations and donations modify the subjective experience of human beings as regards the image they have of themselves, of body, of life and of death. If the concern of the quality of life and the survival of the patients is a completely human phenomenon, the fact remains that the possibility of organ transplantation and its justification (...)
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