Results for 'omniscience'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Logical Omniscience and Acknowledged vs. Consequential Commitments.Niels Skovgaard Olsen - 2014 - Questions, Discourse and Dialogue: 20 Years After Making It Explicit, Proceedings of AISB50.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider the explanatory resources that Robert Brandom‟s distinction between acknowledged and consequential commitments affords in relation to the problem of logical omniscience. With this distinction the importance of the doxastic perspective under consideration for the relationship between logic and norms of reasoning is emphasized, and it becomes possible to handle a number of problematic cases discussed in the literature without thereby incurring a commitment to revisionism about logic. 12.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  37
    Divine Omniscience and Human Free Will: A Logical and Metaphysical Analysis.Ciro De Florio & Aldo Frigerio - 2019 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    This book deals with an old conundrum: if God knows what we will choose tomorrow, how can we be free to choose otherwise? If all our choices are already written, is our freedom simply an illusion? This book provides a precise analysis of this dilemma using the tools of modern ontology and the logic of time. With a focus on three intertwined concepts - God's nature, the formal structure of time, and the metaphysics of time, including the relationship between temporal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3. Truth, Omniscience, and Cantorian Arguments: An Exchange.Alvin Plantinga & Patrick Grim - 1993 - Philosophical Studies 71 (3):267-306.
    An exchange between Patrick Grim and Alvin Plantinga regarding Cantorian arguments against the possibility of an omniscient being.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  4. Omnipotence, Omniscience, and God’s Right.T. Raja Rosenhagen, Michael Pohl, Jana Lührmann & Anna Brückner - 2007 - In Nicola Moeßner, Sebastian Schmoranzer & Christian Weidemann (eds.), Richard Swinburne: Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Frankfurt, Germany: pp. 125-139.
    This paper deals with Swinburne’s project of developing a theodicy. We criticise this project from both an external and an internal perspective. Regarding the first strategy, the target of our critique is Swinburne’s construal of God’s attributes—especially omniscience—and the related issue of incorrigible foreknowledge. We argue that Swinburne has to clarify and improve his position to deal with the fideist or the atheist. Regarding the second strategy, we focus on Swinburne’s notion of God’s right. In this context, the parent-child-analogy (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Omniscience and the Identification Problem.Robert Bass - 2007 - Florida Philosophical Review 7 (1):78-91.
    I discuss the propositional knowledge of an omniscient being, knowledge of facts that can be represented by that-clauses in sentences such as ‘John knows that the world is round.’ I shall focus upon questions about a supposedly omniscient being who propositionally knows the truth about all current states of affairs. I shall argue that there is no such being.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Divine omniscience and experience: A Reply to Alter.Yujin Nagasawa - 2003 - Ars Disputandi 3.
    According to one antitheist argument, the necessarily omniscient, necessarily omnipotent, and necessarily omnibenevolent Anselmian God does not exist, because if God is necessarily omnipotent it is impossible for Him to comprehend fully certain concepts, such as fear, frustration and despair, that an omniscient being needs to possess. Torin Alter examines this argument and provides three elaborate objections to it. I argue that theists would not accept any of them because they con ict with traditional Judaeo-Christian doctrines concerning divine attributes.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7. Omniscience, Freedom, and Dependence.John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2):346-367.
    Several theorists (Merricks, Westphal, and McCall) have recently claimed to offer a novel way to respond to the dilemma of freedom and foreknowledge, rooted in Molina's insight that God's beliefs depend on what we do, rather than the other way around. In this paper we argue that these responses either beg the question, or else are dressed-up versions of Ockhamism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  8. Omniscience and Worthiness of Worship.Wesley D. Cray - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):147-153.
    At first glance, the properties being omniscient and being worthy of worship might appear to be perfectly co-instantiable. But there are reasons to be worried about this co-instantiability, as it turns out that, depending on our commitments with respect to certain kinds of knowledge and notions of personhood, it might be the case that no being—God included—could instantiate both. In this paper, I lay out and motivate this claim before going on to consider a variety of responses—some more plausible than (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Omniscience, Freedom, and Mystery.Damiano Migliorini - 2018 - Nuovo Giornale di Filosofia Della Religione 8 (2).
    The text published below is the translation of a part of this published article: "Il Dio che rischia e che cambia: introduzione all’Open Theism". The issue of omniscience is one of the most debated in contemporary Analytical Philosophy of Religion. However, what is often lacking in this discussion is a deep understanding of the dilemma of omniscience and human freedom within a complete epistemological (what can we really say about the divine and the world), metaphysical and theological framework. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  3
    Omniscience and the Rhetoric of Reason: Rationality, Argumentation, and Religious Authority in Śāntarakṣita's Tattvasaṅgraha and Kamalaśīla's Pañjikā.Sara L. McClintock - 2010 - Wisdom Publications.
    The great Buddhist writer Santaraksita (725-88) was central to the Buddhist traditions spread into Tibet. He and his disciple Kamalasila were among the most influential thinkers in classical India. They debated ideas not only within the Buddhist tradition but also with exegetes of other Indian religions, and they both traveled and nurtured Buddhism in Tibet during its infancy there. Their views, however, have been notoriously hard to classify. The present volume examines Santaraksita's encyclopedic Tattvasamgraha and Kamalasila's detailed commentary on that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Omniscience, Time, and Freedom.Linda Zagzebski - 2004 - In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 1–25.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Ideal rationality and logical omniscience.Declan Smithies - 2015 - Synthese 192 (9):2769-2793.
    Does rationality require logical omniscience? Our best formal theories of rationality imply that it does, but our ordinary evaluations of rationality seem to suggest otherwise. This paper aims to resolve the tension by arguing that our ordinary evaluations of rationality are not only consistent with the thesis that rationality requires logical omniscience, but also provide a compelling rationale for accepting this thesis in the first place. This paper also defends an account of apriori justification for logical beliefs that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  13. Against omniscience: The case from essential indexicals.Patrick Grim - 1985 - Noûs 19 (2):151-180.
  14.  82
    Omniscience.Edward Wierenga - 2008 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Omniscience is the divine attribute of possessing complete or unlimited knowledge. This article examines motivations for taking such a property to be a divine attribute, attempts to define or analyse omniscience, possible limitations on the extent of divine knowledge, and, finally, objections either to the coherence of the concept or to its compatibility with other divine attributes or with widely accepted claims.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  15.  49
    Omniscience and deliberation.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (3):225 - 236.
    I argue that if deliberation is incompatible with (fore)knowing what one is going to do at the time of the deliberation, then God cannot deliberate. However, this thesis cannot be used to show either that God cannot act intentionally or that human persons cannot deliberate. Further, I have suggested that though omniscience is incompatible with deliberation, it is not incompatible with either some speculation or knowing something on the grounds of inference.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. Divine omniscience and voluntary action.Nelson Pike - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (1):27-46.
  17. Divine Omniscience and Omnipotence in Medieval Philosophy. Islamic, Jewish and Christian Perspectives.Tamar Rudavsky - 1988 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 50 (1):148-149.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18.  25
    Omniscience Principles and Functions of Bounded Variation.Fred Richman - 2002 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 48 (1):111-116.
    A very weak omniscience principle is formulated, related omniscience principlesare considered, and the theorem that a function of bounded variation is the difference of two increasing functions is shown to be equivalent to the omniscience principle WLPO. It is a so shown that an arbitrary function with located variation on an interval is the difference of two increasing functions.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Fragmentation and logical omniscience.Adam Elga & Agustín Rayo - 2022 - Noûs 56 (3):716-741.
    It would be good to have a Bayesian decision theory that assesses our decisions and thinking according to everyday standards of rationality — standards that do not require logical omniscience (Garber 1983, Hacking 1967). To that end we develop a “fragmented” decision theory in which a single state of mind is represented by a family of credence functions, each associated with a distinct choice condition (Lewis 1982, Stalnaker 1984). The theory imposes a local coherence assumption guaranteeing that as an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20. Omniscient beings are dialetheists.Peter Milne - 2007 - Analysis 67 (3):250–251.
  21. Omniscience, time, and freedom.Linda Zagzebski - 2004 - In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell. pp. 3-26.
  22.  46
    Restricted Omniscience and Ways of Knowing.T. Ryan Byerly - 2014 - Sophia 53 (4):427-434.
    Recently, several philosophers have moved from a classical account of divine omniscience according to which God knows all truths to a restricted account of divine omniscience according to which God knows all knowable truths. But an important objection offered by Alexander Pruss threatens to show that if God knows all knowable truths, God must also know all truths. In this paper, I show that there is a way out of Pruss’s objection for the advocate of restricted omniscience (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Some Neglected Problems of Omniscience.Patrick Grim - 1983 - American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):265-277.
    One set of neglected problems consists of paradoxes of omniscience clearly recognizable as forms of the Liar, and these I have never seen raised at all. Other neglected problems are difficulties for omniscience posed by recent work on belief de se and essential indexicals. These have not yet been given the attention they deserve.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  24. Divine omniscience and knowledge de se.Yujin Nagasawa - 2003 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 53 (2):73-82.
    Patrick Grim argues that God cannot beomniscient because no one other than me canacquire knowledge de se of myself. Inparticular, according to Grim, God cannot knowwhat I know in knowing that I am making amess. I argue, however, that given twoplausible principles regarding divineattributes there is no reason to accept Grim'sconclusion that God cannot be omniscient. Inthis paper I focus on the relationship betweendivine omniscience and necessaryimpossibilities, in contrast to the generaltrend of research since Aquinas, which hasconcentrated on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  25.  32
    Omniscience-Immutability Arguments.Richard M. Gale - 1986 - American Philosophical Quarterly 23 (4):319 - 335.
  26.  10
    Omniscience: From a Logical Point of View.Paul Weingartner - 2008 - Ontos.
    The aim of the book is to clarify the concept of omniscience. This is done first by discussing basic questions on omniscience (chs.1-12) and secondly by offering a theory of omniscience as an axiomatic system in which also a definition of omniscience is given (ch.13). The twelve chapters deal with questions like whether everything is true what God knows, whether God's knowledge is bound to time, whether it concerns singular truths or only laws, whether it extends (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  26
    Omniscience, Tensed Facts, and Divine Eternity.William Lane Craig - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):225-241.
    A difficulty for a view of divine eternity as timelessness is that if time is tensed, then God, in virtue of His omniscience, must know tensed facts. But tensed facts, such as It is now t, can only be known by a temporally located being.Defenders of divine atemporality may attempt to escape the force of this argument by contending either that a timeless being can know tensed facts or else that ignorance of tensed facts is compatible with divine (...). Kvanvig, Wierenga, and Leftow adopt both of these strategies in their various defenses of divine timelessness. Their respective solutions are analyzed in detail and shown to be untenable.Thus, if the theist holds to a tensed view of time, he should construe divine eternity in terms of omnitemporality. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  28. Omniscience and the present moment.Don Lodzinski - 1998 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 21 (3):210-229.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Omniscience and Eternity.Murray Macbeath & Paul Helm - 1989 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 63:55-87.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Omnipotence, omniscience, and omnipresence.William J. Wainwright - 2010 - In Charles Taliaferro & Chad V. Meister (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Philosophical Theology. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  31. Divine omniscience and voluntary action.Nelson Pike - 1982 - In Steven M. Cahn & David Shatz (eds.), Contemporary philosophy of religion. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  32.  16
    Omniscience and ignorance.Duncan Pritchard - 2021 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 66 (1):e41050.
    God’s omniscience generates certain puzzles, not least regarding how such omniscience is compatible with human free will. One option in this regard is to impose limitations on the scope of God’s knowledge, but that then poses the further question of how such limitations can be compatible with God’s nature as a perfect being. I offer a novel way of approaching these questions, which appeals to what I claim is an independently motivated distinction between lacking knowledge and being ignorant. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  86
    Omniscience, Tensed Facts, and Divine Eternity.William Lane Craig - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):227--228.
    A difficulty for a view of divine eternity as timelessness is that if time is tensed, then God, in virtue of His omniscience, must know tensed facts. But tensed facts, such as It is now t, can only be known by a temporally located being.Defenders of divine atemporality may attempt to escape the force of this argument by contending either that a timeless being can know tensed facts or else that ignorance of tensed facts is compatible with divine (...). Kvanvig, Wierenga, and Leftow adopt both of these strategies in their various defenses of divine timelessness. Their respective solutions are analyzed in detail and shown to be untenable.Thus, if the theist holds to a tensed view of time, he should construe divine eternity in terms of omnitemporality. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34. Omniscience and indexical reference.Hector-Neri Castañeda - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (7):203-210.
  35.  71
    Is omniscience impossible?Rik Peels - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (4):481-490.
    In a recent paper, Dennis Whitcomb argues that omniscience is impossible. But if there cannot be any omniscient beings, then God, at least as traditionally conceived, does not exist. The objection is, roughly, that the thesis that there is an omniscient being, in conjunction with some principles about grounding, such as its transitivity and irreflexivity, entails a contradiction. Since each of these principles is highly plausible, divine omniscience has to go. In this article, I argue that Whitcomb's argument, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. Truth, omniscience, and the knower.Patrick Grim - 1988 - Philosophical Studies 54 (1):9 - 41.
    Let us sum up. The paradox of the Knower poses a direct and formal challenge to the coherence of common notions of knowledge and truth. We've considered a number of ways one might try to meet that challenge: propositional views of truth and knowledge, redundancy or operator views, and appeal to hierarchy of various sorts. Mere appeal to propositions or operators, however, seems to be inadequate to the task of the Knower, at least if unsupplemented by an auxiliary recourse to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37. Problems for Omniscience.Patrick Grim - 2013 - In J. P. Moreland, Chad Meister & Khaldoun A. Sweis (eds.), Debating Christian Theism. Oxford Univ. Press. pp. 169-180.
    A survey of logical problems for the concept of omniscience.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Omniscience.Joshua Hoffman & Gary S. Rosenkrantz - 2002 - In The Divine Attributes. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 111–142.
    This chapter contains section titled: Omniscience as Maximal Knowledge The Analysis of Omniscience Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Divine omniscience and the fatalist dilemma.David Kyle Johnson - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (4):435–54.
    Arguments against our free will pose a serious problem. Although there are not very many philosophers who call themselves fatalists, quite a few are convinced that fatalism follows from common assumptions. Assuming that most believe themselves to be free, identifying ways to avoid the conclusion of such fatalist arguments is quite an important task. I begin by dealing specifically with theological fatalism. I present many versions of theological fatalism, but come to the conclusion that only one version constitutes a genuine (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  73
    Omniscience and experience.Marcel Sarot - 1991 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (2):89 - 102.
    My conclusions are the following:We can distinguish between two sorts of kowledge: intellectual knowledge (knowledge of true propositions) and experiential knowledge (knowledge of how certain experiences feel).If we want the doctrine of divine omniscience to be theologically relevant, we will have to assert that divine omniscience involves experiential as well as intellectual omniscience.In order to be omniscient, God does not need to share all the feelings of His creatures with them. However, in order to be experientially omniscient, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41.  12
    Omniscience and Semantic Information.Bernardo Alonso - 2017 - Manuscrito 40 (4):77-96.
    ABSTRACT First, I consider a few motivations to idealize epistemic logics1 in such a degree that brings up the problem of logical omniscience [LOP]. I argue that the main motivation to hold omniscience is of a philosophical-scientific2 background, in the sense philosophers have a not so peculiar way of investigating underlying mechanisms, i.e., the interaction of several different components of complex systems may be better understood in isolation, even if such components are not found isolated in a realistic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. On Omniscience and a 'Set of All Truths': A Reply to Bringsjord.Patrick Grim - 1990 - Analysis 50 (4):271 - 276.
  43. Omniscience and rationality in microeconomics.Maurice Lagueux - unknown
    It would be very difficult to discuss the question concerning the hypothesis of omniscience in microeconomics without relating this hypothesis to the more fundamental hypothesis of rationality (usually referred to as rationality principle or postulate) which is at the base of the very idea of an economic theory and even social sciences. Indeed omniscience is a quality which was typically attributed to homo oeconomicus whose essential characteristic is to be perfectly "rational". This association between omniscience and rationality (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Impossible worlds and logical omniscience: an impossibility result.Jens Christian Bjerring - 2013 - Synthese 190 (13):2505-2524.
    In this paper, I investigate whether we can use a world-involving framework to model the epistemic states of non-ideal agents. The standard possible-world framework falters in this respect because of a commitment to logical omniscience. A familiar attempt to overcome this problem centers around the use of impossible worlds where the truths of logic can be false. As we shall see, if we admit impossible worlds where “anything goes” in modal space, it is easy to model extremely non-ideal agents (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  45.  56
    Grim, Omniscience, and Cantor’s Theorem.Martin Lembke - 2012 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 17 (2):211-223.
    Although recent evidence is somewhat ambiguous, if not confusing, Patrick Grim still seems to believe that his Cantorian argument against omniscienceis sound. According to this argument, it follows by Cantor’s power set theorem that there can be no set of all truths. Hence, assuming that omniscience presupposes precisely such a set, there can be no omniscient being. Reconsidering this argument, however, guided in particular by Alvin Plantinga’s critique thereof, I find it far from convincing. Not only does it have (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  6
    Temporal Omniscience, Free will, and Their Logic.Lifeng Zhang - 2023 - Global Philosophy 33 (1):1-9.
    Taking divine omniscience as including temporal omniscience, which means God exists at all times and knows everything, I point out the fallacies in an incompatibilist argument. Syntactically, due to misapplication of the principle of substitutivity, this incompatibilist argument isn’t valid. Semantically, due to cancelation of a supposition on which God’s earlier belief depends, an agent’s alternative action won’t result in falsification of divine belief. Finally, by appealing to an eternalist conception of truth of proposition about the future, I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  96
    Omniscience and maximal power.Thomas Metcalf - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (3):289-306.
    This essay examines a conflict between God's omnipotence and His omniscience. I discuss our intuitions regarding omnipotence and omniscience and describe a method by which we can decide whether a being is omnipotent. I consider the most promising versions of omnipotence and argue that they produce a genuine conflict with omniscience. Finally, I suggest that we can take the example of omniscience and generalize it to several of God's essential properties and thereby reveal incompatibilities that result (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  48.  79
    Omniscience and pantheism.William J. Mander - 2000 - Heythrop Journal 41 (2):199–208.
    This article argues that theism entails a species of pantheism on the grounds that there is simply no discernible difference between the God's knowledge of the world and the world that God knows. The case against this thesis begins with the traditional theory of distinctions. But since God is necessarily omniscient there is not even the possibility that these might be considered apart and thus distinguished in that way. But neither is it possible to do this by means of Leibnitz's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49.  54
    Logical omniscience as infeasibility.Sergei Artemov & Roman Kuznets - 2014 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 165 (1):6-25.
    Logical theories for representing knowledge are often plagued by the so-called Logical Omniscience Problem. The problem stems from the clash between the desire to model rational agents, which should be capable of simple logical inferences, and the fact that any logical inference, however complex, almost inevitably consists of inference steps that are simple enough. This contradiction points to the fruitlessness of trying to solve the Logical Omniscience Problem qualitatively if the rationality of agents is to be maintained. We (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  66
    Defining Omniscience.Daniel Diederich Farmer - 2010 - Faith and Philosophy 27 (3):306-320.
    In contemporary philosophy of religion, the doctrine of omniscience is typically rendered propositionally, as the claim that God knows all true propositions (and believes none that are false). But feminist work makes clear what even the analytic tradition sometimes confesses, namely, that propositional knowledge is quite limited in scope. The adequacy of propositional conceptions of omniscience is therefore in question. This paper draws on the work of feminist epistemologists to articulate alternative renderings of omniscience which remedy the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000