Results for 'mind-body problem'

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  1. The Mind-Body Problem.Jerry Fodor - 1981 - Scientific American 244 (1):114-25.
  2.  12
    The Mind-Body Problem: A Psychobiological Approach.Mario Augusto Bunge - 1980 - Pergamon Press.
  3. The Mind-Body Problem: An Opinionated Introduction.David M. Armstrong - 1999 - Westview Press.
    The emphasis is always on the arguments used, and the way one position develops from another. By the end of the book the reader is afforded both a grasp of the state of the controversy, and how we got there.
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  4.  89
    The Mind-Body Problem After Fifty Years.Jaegwon Kim - 1998 - In Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 3-21.
    It was about half a century ago that the mindbody problem, which like much else in serious metaphysics had been moribund for several decades, was resurrected as a mainstream philosophical problem. The first impetus came from Gilbert Ryle's The Concept of Mind , published in 1948, and Wittgenstein's well-known, if not well-understood, reflections on the nature of mentality and mental language, especially in his Philosophical Investigations which appeared in 1953. The primary concerns of Ryle and (...)
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  5. Acquaintance and the Mind-Body Problem.Katalin Balog - 2012 - In Simone Gozzano & Christopher S. Hill (eds.), New Perspectives on Type Identity: The Mental and the Physical. Cambridge University Press. pp. 16-43.
    In this paper I begin to develop an account of the acquaintance that each of us has with our own conscious states and processes. The account is a speculative proposal about human mental architecture and specifically about the nature of the concepts via which we think in first personish ways about our qualia. In a certain sense my account is neutral between physicalist and dualist accounts of consciousness. As will be clear, a dualist could adopt the account I will offer (...)
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  6. Conceivability, Possibility, and the Mind-Body Problem.Katalin Balog - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):497-528.
    This paper was chosen by The Philosopher’s Annual as one of the ten best articles appearing in print in 2000. Reprinted in Volume XXIII of The Philosopher’s Annual. In his very influential book David Chalmers argues that if physicalism is true then every positive truth is a priori entailed by the full physical description – this is called “the a priori entailment thesis – but ascriptions of phenomenal consciousness are not so entailed and he concludes that Physicalism is false. As (...)
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  7. The Mind-Body Problem: An Overview.Kirk Ludwig - 2002 - In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell. pp. 1-46.
    My primary aim in this chapter is to explain in what the traditional mindbody problem consists, what its possible solutions are, and what obstacles lie in the way of a resolution. The discussion will develop in two phases. The first phase, sections 1.2–1.4, will be concerned to get clearer about the import of our initial question as a precondition of developing an account of possible responses to it. The second phase, sections 1.5–1.6, explains how a problem (...)
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  8. The Mind-Body Problem and Explanatory Dualism.Nicholas Maxwell - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (291):49-71.
    An important part of the mind-brain problem arises because sentience and consciousness seem inherently resistant to scientific explanation and understanding. The solution to this dilemma is to recognize, first, that scientific explanation can only render comprehensible a selected aspect of what there is, and second, that there is a mode of explanation and understanding, the personalistic, quite different from, but just as viable as, scientific explanation. In order to understand the mental aspect of brain processes - that aspect (...)
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  9. Idealism and the Mind-Body Problem.David Chalmers - 2019 - In William Seager (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Panpsychism. New York: Routledge. pp. 353-373.
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  10. Can We Solve the Mind-Body Problem?Colin McGinn - 1989 - Mind 98 (July):349-66.
  11. The Mind-Body Problem.Jerry Fodor - 2003 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  12. The Mind-Body Problem: Not a Pseudo-Problem.Herbert Feigl - 1960 - In Sidney Hook (ed.), Dimensions of Mind. New York University Press.
     
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  13. The Mind-Body Problem: Taking Stock After Forty Years.Jaegwon Kim - 1997 - Philosophical Perspectives 11:185-207.
  14. The Mind-Body Problem and Quine's Repudiation Theory.Nathan Stemmer - 2001 - Behavior and Philosophy 29:187-202.
    Most scholars who presently deal with the Mind-Body problem consider themselves monist materialists. Nevertheless, many of them also assume that there exist (in some sense of existence) mental entities. But since these two positions do not harmonize quite well, the literature is full of discussions about how to reconcile the positions. In this paper, I will defend a materialist theory that avoids all these problems by completely rejecting the existence of mental entities. This is Quine's repudiation theory. (...)
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  15. The Mind-Body Problem in the Origin of Logical Empiricism: Herbert Feigl and Psychophysical Parallelism.Michael Heidelberger - 2001 - In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Cogprints. Pittsburgh University Pres. pp. 233--262.
    In the 19th century, "Psychophysical Parallelism" was the most popular solution of the mind-body problem among physiologists, psychologists and philosophers. (This is not to be mixed up with Leibnizian and other cases of "Cartesian" parallelism.) The fate of this non-Cartesian view, as founded by Gustav Theodor Fechner, is reviewed. It is shown that Feigl's "identity theory" eventually goes back to Alois Riehl who promoted a hybrid version of psychophysical parallelism and Kantian mind-body theory which was (...)
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  16. The Mind-Body Problem: A Guide to the Current Debate.Richard Warner & Tadeusz Szubka (eds.) - 1994 - Blackwell.
  17.  11
    The Mind-Body Problem.Mario Bunge - 1983 - Noûs 17 (2):316-321.
  18. Can We Solve the Mind-Body Problem?Colin McGinn - 1989 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  19. The Mind-Body Problem.Tim Crane - 1999 - In Rob Wilson & Frank Keil (eds.), The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.
    The mind-body problem is the problem of explaining how our mental states, events and processes—like beliefs, actions and thinking—are related to the physical states, events and processes in our bodies. A question of the form, ‘how is A related to B?’ does not by itself pose a philosophical problem. To pose such a problem, there has to be something about A and B which makes the relation between them seem problematic. Many features of (...) and body have been cited as responsible for our sense of the problem. Here I will concentrate on two: the fact that mind and body seem to interact causally, and the distinctive features of consciousness. A long tradition in philosophy has held, with René Descartes, that the mind must be a non-bodily entity: a soul or mental substance. This thesis is called ‘substance dualism’ (or ‘Cartesian dualism’) because it says that there are two kinds of substance in the world, mental and physical or material. One reason for believing this is the belief that the soul, unlike the body, is immortal. Another reason for believing it is that we have free will, and this seems to require that the mind is a non-physical thing, since all physical things are subject to the laws of nature. (shrink)
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  20.  12
    The Mind-Body Problem: Taking Stock After Forty Years.Jaegwon Kim - 1997 - Noûs 31 (S11):185-207.
  21. The Mind-Body Problem: A Psychobiological Approach.Mario Bunge - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (3):282-286.
     
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  22.  10
    Consciousness and the Mind-Body Problem: A Reader.Torin Alter & Robert J. Howell - 2011 - Oup Usa.
    Ideal for courses in consciousness and the philosophy of mind, Consciousness and The Mind-Body Problem: A Reader presents thirty-three classic and contemporary readings, organized into five sections that cover the major issues in this debate: the challenge for physicalism, physicalist responses, alternative responses, the significance of ignorance, and mental causation. Edited by Torin Alter and Robert J. Howell, the volume features work from such leading figures as Karen Bennett, Ned Block, David J. Chalmers, Frank Jackson, Colin (...)
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  23.  73
    The Mind-Body Problem as Seen by Students of Different Disciplines.Jochen Fahrenberg & Marcus Cheetham - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (5):47-59.
    The mind body problem is a continuing issue in philosophy. No surveys known to us have been conducted about the actual preferences of, for example, psychology students for particular preconceptions about the mind body relation. These preconceptions may have different practical implications for decisions concerning the object and method of research, the choice of explanatory device for psychological and other research data and for the approach of professionals in practice. A questionnaire comprising ten different preconceptions (...)
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  24.  62
    The Mind Body Problem and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.Harold J. Morowitz - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (3):271-275.
    Cartesian mind body dualism and modern versions of this viewpoint posit a mind thermodynamically unrelated to the body but informationally interactive. The relation between information and entropy developed by Leon Brillouin demonstrates that any information about the state of a system has entropic consequences. It is therefore impossible to dissociate the mind's information from the body's entropy. Knowledge of that state of the system without an energetically significant measurement would lead to a violation of (...)
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  25. The Mind-Body Problem at Century's Turn.Jaegwon Kim - 2004 - In Brian Leiter (ed.), The Future for Philosophy. Clarendon Press. pp. 129-152.
    A plausible terminus for the mind-body debate begins by embracing ontological physicalism—the view that there is only one kind of substance in the concrete world, and that it is material substance. Taking mental causation seriously, this terminus also embraces conditional reductionism, the thesis that only physically reducible (i.e., functionalizable) mental properties can be causally efficacious. Intentional/cognitive properties (what David Chalmers calls “psychological” aspects of mind) are physically reducible, but qualia (“phenomenal” aspects of mind) are not. In (...)
     
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  26. Color and the MindBody Problem.Alex Byrne - 2006 - Dialectica 60 (2):223-44.
    b>: there is no “mind-body problem”, or “hard problem of consciousness”; if there is a hard problem of something, it is the problem of reconciling the manifest and scientific images.
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    Another Mind-Body Problem: A History of Racial Non-Being.John Harfouch - 2018 - Albany: SUNY.
    The mind-body problem in philosophy is typically understood as a discourse concerning the relation of mental states to physical states, and the experience of sensation. On this level it seems to transcend issues of race and racism, but Another Mind-Body Problem demonstrates that racial distinctions have been an integral part of the discourse since the Modern period in philosophy. Reading figures such as Descartes, Leibniz, and Kant in their historical contexts, John Harfouch uncovers discussions (...)
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    The MindBody Problem After Fifty Years: Jaegwon Kim.Jaegwon Kim - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:3-21.
    It was about half a century ago that the mindbody problem, which like much else in serious metaphysics had been moribund for several decades, was resurrected as a mainstream philosophical problem. The first impetus came from Gilbert Ryle's The Concept of Mind, published in 1948, and Wittgenstein's well-known, if not well-understood, reflections on the nature of mentality and mental language, especially in his Philosophical Investigations which appeared in 1953. The primary concerns of Ryle and Wittgenstein, (...)
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  29.  97
    The 'Mind'/'Body' Problem and First-Person Process: Three Types of Concepts.Eugene T. Gendlin - 2000 - In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization--An Anthology. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. pp. 109-118.
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  30. The Mind-Body-Body Problem.Robert Hanna & Evan Thompson - 2003 - Theoria Et Historia Scientiarum 7 (T):24-44.
    ? We gratefully acknowledge the Center for Consciousness Studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson, which provided a grant for the support of this work. E.T. is also supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the McDonnell Project in Philosophy and the Neurosciences. 1 See David Woodruff Smith.
     
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  31. Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    This first extensive study of Spinoza's philosophy of mind concentrates on two problems crucial to the philosopher's thoughts on the matter: the requirements for having a thought about a particular object, and the problem of the mind's relation to the body. Della Rocca contends that Spinoza's positions are systematically connected with each other and with a principle at the heart of his metaphysical system: his denial of causal or explanatory relations between the mental and the physical. (...)
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  32. What Mind-Body Problem?Alex Byrne - 2006 - Boston Review (3):27-30.
  33. The Mind-Body Problem.Sydney Shoemaker - 1994 - In The Mind-Body Problem: A Guide to the Current Debate. Cambridge: Blackwell.
    * Argument from authoritative self-knowledge 1. We have a "privileged access" to our own mental states in the sense we have the authority on what mental states we are in. 2. Through introspection, we are aware of our mental states but not aware of them as physical states of any sort or as functional states. 3. Therefore, our mental states cannot be physical states.
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  34. Materialism and the Mind-Body Problem.Paul Feyerabend - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (1):49-67.
    The crudest form of materialism will be taken as the basis of argument. If it can successfully evade the objections of some philosophers, then a more refined doctrine will be even less troubled.
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  35. History of the Mind-Body Problem.Tim Crane & Sarah Patterson (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    This collection of new essays put the debates on the mind-body problem into historical context.
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  36. Mind in a Physical World: An Essay on the MindBody Problem and Mental Causation.Jaegwon Kim - 1998 - MIT Press.
    This book, based on Jaegwon Kim's 1996 Townsend Lectures, presents the philosopher's current views on a variety of issues in the metaphysics of the mind...
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  37. The Mind-Body Problem in Contemporary Philosophy.Howard M. Robinson - 1976 - Zygon 11 (December):346-360.
  38. The Mind-Body Problem in the Development of Logical Empiricism.Herbert Feigl - 1950 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4 (11):64-83.
     
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  39. The Mind-Body Problem and Whitehead’s Nonreductive Monism.Anderson Weekes - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9-10):40-66.
    There have been many attempts to retire dualism from active philosophic life, replacing it with something less removed from science, but we are no closer to that goal now than fifty years ago. I propose breaking the stalemate by considering marginal perspectives that may help identify unrecognized assumptions that limit the mainstream debate. Comparison with Whitehead highlights ways that opponents of dualism continue to uphold the Cartesian “real distinction” between mind and body. Whitehead, by contrast, insists on a (...)
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  40. The Mind-Body Problem.John R. Searle - 1991 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell. pp. 141--46.
  41.  12
    Structure and the Metaphysics of Mind: How Hylomorphism Solves the Mind-Body Problem.William Jaworski - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    William Jaworski shows how hylomorphism can be used to solve mind-body problems--the question of how thought, feeling, perception, and other mental phenomena fit into the physical world. Hylomorphism claims that structure is a basic ontological and explanatory principle, and is responsible for individuals being the kinds of things they are, and having the powers or capacities they have. From a hylomorphic perspective, mind-body problems are byproducts of a worldview that rejects structure, and which lacks a basic (...)
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  42. Can Matter Think? The Mind-Body Problem in the Clarke-Collins Correspondence.Marleen Rozemond - 2009 - In Jon Miller (ed.), Topics in Early Modern Philosophy of Mind. Springer.
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the human soul against Anthony Collins’ materialism. Clarke argues that consciousness must belong to an indivisible entity, and matter is divisible. Collins contends that consciousness could belong to a composite subject by emerging from material qualities that belong to its parts. While many early modern thinkers assumed that this is not possible, (...)
     
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  43. Conscious Realism and the Mind-Body Problem.Donald Hoffman - 2008 - Mind and Matter 6 (1):87-121.
    Despite substantial efforts by many researchers, we still have no scientific theory of how brain activity can create or be con- scious experience. This is troubling since we have a large body of correlations between brain activity and consciousness, correlations normally assumed to entail that brain activity creates conscious experience. Here I explore a solution to the mind-body problem that starts with the converse assumption: these correlations arise because consciousness creates brain activity and indeed creates all (...)
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  44. The Mind-Body Problem: Taking Stock After Forty Years: Mental Causation, Reduction and Supervenience.J. Kim - 1997 - Philosophical Perspectives 11:185-207.
  45. Absent Qualia and the Mind-Body Problem.Michael Tye - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (2):139-168.
    At the very heart of the mind-body problem is the question of the nature of consciousness. It is consciousness, and in particular _phenomenal_ consciousness, that makes the mind-body relation so deeply perplexing. Many philosophers hold that no defi nition of phenomenal consciousness is possible: any such putative defi nition would automatically use the concept of phenomenal consciousness and thus render the defi nition circular. The usual view is that the concept of phenomenal consciousness is one (...)
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  46.  11
    Mind-Body Problem: Does Complexity Exist Objectively?Bernard Korzeniewski - 2015 - Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (6):351-364.
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  47.  65
    The Mind/Body Problem is the Feeling/Function Problem: Harnad on Dennett on Chalmers.Stevan Harnad - 2001
    The mind/body problem is the feeling/function problem (Harnad 2001). The only way to "solve" it is to provide a causal/functional explanation of how and why we feel..
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  48. How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem.Nicholas Humphrey - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):5-20.
    The identity of conscious states and brain states must remain a mystery until we find a way of characterising both sides of the equation in terms that have the same ‘dimensions’. In this paper I stress the need for ‘dual currency concepts’ that not only are but can be seen to be as appropriate for talking about, say, the experience of pain as for talking about the corresponding working of the brain. In the light of evolutionary theory I make a (...)
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  49. Materialism and the Mind-Body Problem.David M. Rosenthal (ed.) - 1971 - Prentice-Hall.
    An expanded and updated edition of this classic collection.
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  50.  11
    Another Mind-Body Problem: A History of Racial Non-Being by John Harfouch.Susan Peppers-Bates - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):183-184.
    Despite ideals of philosophical objectivity, who speaks is as important as what is said, and those who fall outside the Eurocentric male norm often are not heard or invited to participate in theorizing. New work chronicling and challenging the creation of white supremacist ideology in philosophy is needed greatly. In this important book, Another Mind-Body Problem: A History of Racial Non-Being, John Harfouch reveals the hermeneutical injustice that obscures how professional philosophers understand the mind-body (...) today and how the terms of that problem were created in the early modern period. Unlike the puzzle of causal relations between the mind and body canonized by white philosophers... (shrink)
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