Results for 'make-believe'

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  1. Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1990 - Harvard University Press.
    Mimesis as Make-Believe is important reading for everyone interested in the workings of representational art.
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  2. Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare's Time.Garry Wills - 2014 - Yale University Press.
    Shakespeare’s plays abound with kings and leaders who crave a public stage and seize every opportunity to make their lives a performance: Antony, Cleopatra, Richard III, Othello, and many others. Such self-dramatizing characters appear in the work of other playwrights of the era as well, Marlowe’s Edward II and Tamburlaine among them. But Elizabethan playwrights were not alone in realizing that a sense of theater was essential to the exercise of power. Real rulers knew it, too, and none better (...)
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  3. Models as Make-Believe: Imagination, Fiction and Scientific Representation.Adam Toon - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Models as Make-Believe offers a new approach to scientific modelling by looking to an unlikely source of inspiration: the dolls and toy trucks of children's games of make-believe.
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  4. Models as Make-Believe.Adam Toon - 2010 - In Roman Frigg & Matthew Hunter (eds.), Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science. Boston Studies in Philosophy of Science.
    In this paper I propose an account of representation for scientific models based on Kendall Walton’s ‘make-believe’ theory of representation in art. I first set out the problem of scientific representation and respond to a recent argument due to Craig Callender and Jonathan Cohen, which aims to show that the problem may be easily dismissed. I then introduce my account of models as props in games of make-believe and show how it offers a solution to the (...)
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  5.  15
    Is Make-Believe Only Reproduction?Michela Summa - 2019 - Social Imaginaries 5 (1):97-119.
    This paper develops an analysis of the relation between fiction and make-believe based on the achievements of imagination. The argument aims at a “reciprocal supplementation” between two approaches to fiction. According to one approach, pretense or make-believe structures play a crucial role in our experience of fiction. Discussing Husserl’s view on bound imagining and Walton’s account of fiction as make-believe, I show why pretense and make-believe cannot thereby be reduced to the mere (...)
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  6. Sport, Make-Believe, and Volatile Attitudes.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):275-288.
    The outcomes of sports and competitive games excite intense emotions in many people, even when those same people acknowledge that those outcomes are of trifling importance. I call this incongruity between the judged importance of the outcome and the intense reactions it provokes the Puzzle of Sport. The puzzle can be usefully compared to another puzzle in aesthetics: the Paradox of Fiction, which asks how it is we become emotionally caught up with events and characters we know to be unreal. (...)
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  7. Mimesis as Make-Believe.Kendall L. Walton - 1996 - Synthese 109 (3):413-434.
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  8. Make-Believe and Fictional Reference.Frederick Kroon - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (2):207-214.
  9.  40
    Make-Believe and Model-Based Representation in Science: The Epistemology of Frigg’s and Toon’s Fictionalist Views of Modeling.Michael Poznic - 2016 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):201-218.
    Roman Frigg and Adam Toon, both, defend a fictionalist view of scientific modeling. One fundamental thesis of their view is that scientists are participating in games of make-believe when they study models in order to learn about the models themselves and about target systems represented by the models. In this paper, the epistemology of these two fictionalist views is critically discussed. I will argue that both views can give an explanation of how scientists learn about models they are (...)
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  10. Make-Believe Morality and Fictional Worlds.Mary Mothersill - 2006 - In José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.), Arts and Morality. Routledge. pp. 74-94.
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  11.  34
    Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):161-166.
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  12. Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. WALTON - 1990 - Philosophy 66 (258):527-529.
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  13. Making Believers Out of Computers.Hector J. Levesque - 1986 - Artificial Intelligence 30 (1):81-108.
  14. Metaphor and Prop Oriented MakeBelieve.Kendall L. Walton - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):39-57.
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  15. Sadomasochism as Make-Believe.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (2):21 - 38.
    In "Rethinking Sadomasochism," Patrick Hopkins challenges the "radical" feminist claim that sadomasochism is incompatible with feminism. He does so by appeal to the notion of "simulation." I argue that Hopkins's conclusions are generally right, but they cannot be inferred from his "simulation" argument. I replace Hopkins's "simulation" with Kendall Walton's more sophisticated theory of "make-believe." I use this theory to better argue that privately conducted sadomasochism is compatible with feminism.
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  16.  35
    Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts by Kendall Walton. [REVIEW]Gregory Currie - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (7):367-370.
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  17. The Will to MakeBelieve: Religious Fictionalism, Religious Beliefs, and the Value of Art.Andrea Sauchelli - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 96 (3):620-635.
    I explore some of the reasons why, under specific circumstances, it may be rational to make-believe or imagine certain religious beliefs. Adopting a jargon familiar to certain contemporary philosophers, my main concern here is to assess what reasons can be given for adopting a fictionalist stance towards some religious beliefs. My understanding of fictionalism does not involve solely a propositional attitude but a broader stance, which may include certain acts of pretence. I also argue that a plausible reason (...)
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  18.  42
    Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.J. M. Moravcsik - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):440.
  19.  23
    Memesis As Make-Believe.Kendall Walton - 1990 - Harvard University Press.
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  20. Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
    This essay examines the stereotype that transgender people are “deceivers” and the stereotype's role in promoting and excusing transphobic violence. The stereotype derives from a contrast between gender presentation and sexed body. Because gender presentation represents genital status, Bettcher argues, people who “misalign” the two are viewed as deceivers. The author shows how this system of gender presentation as genital representation is part of larger sexist and racist systems of violence and oppression.
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  21.  19
    Representation and Make-Believe.Alan H. Goldman - 1990 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 36 (3):335 – 350.
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  22.  25
    Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Noel Carroll - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):93-99.
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  23. Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
    : This essay examines the stereotype that transgender people are "deceivers" and the stereotype's role in promoting and excusing transphobic violence. The stereotype derives from a contrast between gender presentation and sexed body. Because gender presentation represents genital status, Bettcher argues, people who "misalign" the two are viewed as deceivers. The author shows how this system of gender presentation as genital representation is part of larger sexist and racist systems of violence and oppression.
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  24. Fiction, Make-Believe and Quasi Emotions.Simo Säätelä - 1994 - British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (1):25-34.
  25.  78
    Make/Believing the World(S): Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism * By Mark S. McLeod-Harrison.D. Efird - 2011 - Analysis 71 (2):404-406.
    ‘We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth’, so Christians confess when they recite the Nicene Creed. Now if the argument of Mark S. McLeod-Harrison’s Make/Believing the World: Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism is correct, God is not alone in that task. We human beings are makers of heaven and earth, too, in the sense that what exists is as it is because our minds have made it so, which is a kind (...)
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  26.  4
    Metaphor and Prop Oriented Make-Believe.Kendall L. Walton - 2005 - In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Clarendon Press.
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  27. Pictures and Make-Believe.Kendall L. Walton - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (3):283-319.
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  28.  35
    The Make-Believe World of Antidepressant Randomized Controlled Trials—An Afterword to Cohen and Jacobs (2010).David H. Jacobs - 2010 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (1):23.
    This afterword extends and refines the arguments presented in Cohen and Jacobs . The main point made by the authors is that the antidepressant randomized controlled trial world is a make-believe world in which researchers act as if a bona fide medical experiment is being conducted. From the assumed existence of the “disorder” and the assumed homogeneity of the treatment groups, through the validity of rating scales and the meaning of their scores, to the presentations of researchers’ ratings (...)
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  29. Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare's Time.Garry Wills - 2014 - Yale University Press.
    _A penetrating study of the images, symbols, pageants, and creative performances ambitious Elizabethans used to secure political power_ Shakespeare’s plays abound with kings and leaders who crave a public stage and seize every opportunity to make their lives a performance: Antony, Cleopatra, Richard III, Othello, and many others. Such self-dramatizing characters appear in the work of other playwrights of the era as well, Marlowe’s Edward II and Tamburlaine among them. But Elizabethan playwrights were not alone in realizing that a (...)
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  30. Metaphor, Fictionalism, Make-Believe: Response to Elisabeth Camp.Kendall L. Walton - manuscript
    Prop oriented make-believe is make-believe utilized for the purpose of understanding what I call “props,” actual objects or states of affairs that make propositions “fictional,” true in the make-believe world. I, David Hills, and others have claimed that prop oriented make-believe lies at the heart of the functioning of many metaphors, and one variety of fictionalism in metaphysics invokes prop oriented make-believe to explain away apparent references to entities some (...)
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  31. Impurely Musical Make-Believe.Eran Guter & Inbal Guter - 2015 - In Alexander Bareis & Lene Nordrum (eds.), How to Make-Believe: The Fictional Truths of the Representational Arts. De Gruyter. pp. 283-306.
    In this study we offer a new way of applying Kendall Walton’s theory of make-believe to musical experiences in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe, which Walton attributes chiefly to ornamental representations. Reading Walton’s theory somewhat against the grain, and supplementing our discussion with a set of instructive examples, we argue that there is clear theoretical gain in explaining certain important aspects of composition and performance in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe (...)
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  32.  38
    Making Believe.Jerrold Levinson - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (2):359-.
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  33. Making Believe[REVIEW]Jenefer Robinson - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (1):138-141.
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  34.  13
    Make Believe: Marie-José Mondzain and Cinema's Christian Economy.Libby Saxton - 2019 - Paragraph 42 (3):301-315.
    This article seeks to highlight the relevance of Marie-José Mondzain's trailblazing writings on Byzantine image theory and its modern legacy, with particular reference to Image, icône, économie (Im...
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  35.  20
    Don’T Stop Make-Believing.Nathan Wildman - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):261-275.
    ABSTRACTHow is it that we can rationally assert that sport outcomes do not really matter, while also seeming to care about them to an absurd degree? This is the so-called puzzle of sport. The broadly Waltonian solution to the puzzle has it that we make-believe the outcomes matter. Recently, Stear has critiqued this Waltonian solution, raising a series of five objections. He has also leveraged these objections to motive his own contextualist solution to the puzzle. The aim of (...)
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  36. On Make-Believe.Laurent Stern - 1967 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 28 (1):24-38.
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  37.  55
    Make Believe.Alan Nordstrom - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):527-527.
  38.  21
    The MakeBelieve Space: Affective Geography in a Postwar Polity. Yael Navaro‐Yashin. Durham: Duke University Press. 2012. Xxi‐270 Pps. [REVIEW]Igor Rubinov - 2013 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 41 (4):1-3.
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  39.  17
    Making Believe: Philosophical Reflections on Fiction C. G. Prado Contributions in Philosophy, 25 Westport, CT and London: Greenwood Press, 1984. Pp. X, 171. $29.95. [REVIEW]Ronald de Sousa - 1987 - Dialogue 26 (3):595.
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  40.  13
    Making Believe: Philosophical Reflections on Fiction (Review).Konstantin Kolenda - 1985 - Philosophy and Literature 9 (2):251-252.
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  41.  10
    Making Believe: Philosophical Reflections on Fiction.Charles Crittenden - 1986 - Noûs 20 (2):283-286.
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  42. The Ontology of Theoretical Modelling: Models as Make-Believe.Adam Toon - 2010 - Synthese 172 (2):301-315.
    The descriptions and theoretical laws scientists write down when they model a system are often false of any real system. And yet we commonly talk as if there were objects that satisfy the scientists’ assumptions and as if we may learn about their properties. Many attempt to make sense of this by taking the scientists’ descriptions and theoretical laws to define abstract or fictional entities. In this paper, I propose an alternative account of theoretical modelling that draws upon Kendall (...)
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  43.  24
    Make-Believe Media: The Politics of Entertainment (Book).Jack A. Nelson & Deni Elliott - 1992 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (3):188 – 189.
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  44.  9
    The Make-Believe Space: Affective Geography in a Postwar Polity. YaelNavaro-Yashin. Durham: Duke University Press. 2012. Xxi-270 Pps. [REVIEW]Igor Rubinov - 2013 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 41 (4):1-3.
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  45.  20
    Making Believe: Philosophical Reflections on Fiction C. G. Prado Contributions in Philosophy, Vol. 25 Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1984. Pp. Viii, 169. [REVIEW]Guy Bouchard - 1985 - Dialogue 24 (3):543-.
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  46.  93
    Fictional Truth and Make-Believe.Dimitria Electra Gatzia & Eric Sotnak - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (2):349-361.
    The statement “Mr. Darcy proposes to Elizabeth” seems true in Jane Austin’s Pride and Prejudice (even though it may not actually appear in the text) while the statement “Mr. Darcy is a detective” seems false. One explanation for this intuition is that when we read or talk about fictional stories, we implicitly employ the fictional operator “It is fictional that” or “It is part of the story that.” “It is fictional that Mr. Darcy proposes to Elizabeth” expresses a true proposition (...)
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  47.  43
    Caricatures and Prop Oriented Make-Believe.Elisa Caldarola & Matteo Plebani - 2016 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
    A caricature can reveal an aspect of its subject that a more faithful representation would fail to render: by depicting a slow and clumsy person as a monkey one can point out such qualities of the depicted subject, and by depicting a person with quite big ears as a person with enormous ears one can point out that the depicted person has rather big ears. How can a form of representation that is by definition inaccurate be so representationally powerful? Figurative (...)
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  48. Précis of Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (2):379-382.
  49.  13
    Making Believe: Philosophical Reflections on Fiction.C. G. Prado - 1984 - Greenwood Press.
  50.  7
    Making MakeBelieve Real: Politics and Theater in Shakespeare's Time. By Garry Wills . Pp. Ix, 414, Newhaven, Yale University Press, 2014, £17.99. [REVIEW]Peter Milward - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (2):327-328.
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