Results for 'laughter'

633 found
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  1.  4
    Laughter an Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.Henri Bergson, Cloudesley Shovell Henry Brereton & Fred Rothwell - 1999 - Franklin Classics.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and (...)
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  2.  5
    Greek Laughter: A Study of Cultural Psychology From Homer to Early Christianity.Stephen Halliwell - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The first book to offer an integrated reading of ancient Greek attitudes to laughter. Taking material from various genres and contexts, the book analyses both the theory and the practice of laughter as a revealing expression of Greek values and mentalities. Greek society developed distinctive institutions for the celebration of laughter as a capacity which could bridge the gap between humans and gods; but it also feared laughter for its power to expose individuals and groups to (...)
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  3.  72
    Taking Laughter Seriously.John Morreall - 1983 - State University of New York Press.
    "The book's qualities are, first, its scope and persuasiveness. The whole book demonstrates the seriousness of humor and its central place in human life. I know of no comparable work.
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  4. Laughter and Literature: A Play Theory of Humor.Brian Boyd - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):1-22.
    : Humor seems uniquely human, but it has deep biological roots. Laughter, the best evidence suggests, derives from the ritualized breathing and open-mouth display common in animal play. Play evolved as training for the unexpected, in creatures putting themselves at risk of losing balance or dominance so that they learn to recover. Humor in turn involves play with the expectations we share-whether innate or acquired-in order to catch one another off guard in ways that simulate risk and stimulate recovery. (...)
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  5. The Philosophy of Laughter and Humor.John Morreall (ed.) - 1986 - State University of New York Press.
    This book assesses the adequacy of the traditional theories of laughter and humor, suggests revised theories, and explores such areas as the aesthetics and ethics of humor, and the relation of amusement to other mental states. Theories of laughter and humor originated in ancient times with the view that laughter is an expression of feelings of superiority over another person. This superiority theory was held by Plato, Aristotle, and Hobbes. Another aspect of laughter, noted by Aristotle (...)
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  6.  33
    Civic Laughter: Aristotle and the Political Virtue of Humor.John Lombardini - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):0090591712470624.
    While the loss of the second book of the Poetics has deprived us of Aristotle’s most extensive account of laughter and comedy, his discussion of eutrapelia (wittiness) as a virtue in his ethical works and in the Rhetoric points toward the importance of humor for his ethical and political thought. This article offers a reconstruction of Aristotle’s account of wittiness and attempts to explain how the virtue of wittiness would animate the everyday interactions of ordinary citizens. Placing Aristotle’s account (...)
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  7. Laughter in Nietzsche’s Thought: A Philosophical Tragicomedy.Lawrence J. Hatab - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (2):67-79.
  8.  93
    Laughter.Roger Scruton & Peter Jones - 1982 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 56 (1):197 - 228.
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  9.  16
    Laughter as dissensus: Kant and the limits of normative theorizing around laughter.Patrick T. Giamario - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (4):795-814.
    Political theorists have traditionally grappled with laughter by posing a simple, normative question: ‘What role, if any, should laughter play in the polis?’ However, the outsized presence of laughter in contemporary politics has rendered this question increasingly obsolete. What good does determining laughter’s role in the polis do when the polis itself is to a large extent shaped by laughter? The present essay argues that Kant’s aesthetic investigations of laughter in the Critique of Judgment (...)
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  10. Laughter.Roger Scruton & Peter Jones - 1982 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes 56:197-228.
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  11.  91
    Studying Laughter in Combination with Two Humanoid Robots.Christian Becker-Asano, Takayuki Kanda, Carlos Ishi & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (3):291-300.
    To let humanoid robots behave socially adequate in a future society, we started to explore laughter as an important para-verbal signal known to influence relationships among humans rather easily. We investigated how the naturalness of various types of laughter in combination with different humanoid robots was judged, first, within a situational context that is suitable for laughter and, second, without describing the situational context. Given the variety of human laughter, do people prefer a certain style for (...)
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  12.  24
    Laughter: Notes on a Passion.Anca Parvulescu - 2010 - MIT Press.
    Uncovering an archive of laughter, from the forbidden giggle to the explosive guffaw.
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  13.  52
    Antiphonal Laughter Between Friends and Strangers.Moria Smoski & Jo-Anne Bachorowski - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):327-340.
  14.  14
    Laughter as Immanent Life-Affirmation: Reconsidering the Educational Value of Laughter Through a Bakhtinian Lens.Joris Vlieghe - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-14.
    In this article I try to conceive a new approach towards laughter in the context of formal schooling. I focus on laughter in so far as it is a bodily response during which we are entirely delivered to uncontrollable, spasmodic reactions. To see the educational relevance of this particular kind of laughter, as well as to understand why laughter is often dealt with in a very negative way in pedagogical contexts, this phenomenon should be carefully distinguished (...)
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  15.  22
    Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.Richard Smith - 1913 - International Journal of Ethics 23 (2):216-218.
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  16.  15
    Laughing with Leviathan: Hobbesian Laughter in Theory and Practice.Zachariah Black - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (3):431-456.
    Thomas Hobbes’s infamously severe accounts of the phenomenon of laughter earned the condemnation of such varied readers as Francis Hutcheson and Friedrich Nietzsche, and he has maintained his reputation as an enemy of humor among contemporary scholars. A difficulty is raised by the fact that Hobbes makes ample use of humor in his writings, displaying his willingness to evoke in his readers what he appears to condemn. This article brings together Hobbes’s statements on laughter and comedic writing with (...)
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  17.  5
    Taking Laughter Seriously.Joseph H. Kupfer - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 18 (1):124.
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  18.  4
    Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences.Albrecht Classen (ed.) - 2010 - Walter de Gruyter.
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's (...) and gender politics in medieval conduct discourse -- Madelon Köhler-Busch. Pushing decorum: uneasy laughter in Heinrich von Dem Türlîn's Diu crône -- Connie L. Scarborough. Laughter and the comic in a religious text -- John Sewell. The son rebelled and so the father made man alone: ridicule and boundary maintenance in The Nizzahon vetus -- Birgit Wiedl. Laughing at the beast: the judensau: anti-Jewish propaganda and humor from the Middle Ages to the early modern period -- Fabian Alfie. Yes . . . but was it funny? Cecco Angiolieri, Rustico Filippi and Giovanni Boccaccio -- Nicolino Applauso. Curses and laughter in medieval Italian comic poetry -- Feargal Béarra. Tromdhámh guaire: a context for laughter and audience in early modern Ireland -- Jean E. Jost. Humorous transgression in the non-conformist fabliaux: a Bakhtinian analysis of three comic tales -- Gretchen Mieszkowski. Chaucerian comedy: Troilus and Criseyde -- Sarah Gordon. Laughing and eating in the fabliaux -- Christine Bousquet-Labouérie. Laughter and medieval stalls -- Scott L. Taylor. Esoteric humor and the incommensurability of laughter -- Jean N. Goodrich. The function of laughter in The second shepherds' play -- Albrecht Classen. Laughing in late-medieval verse and prose narratives -- Rosa Alvarez perez. The workings of desire: Panurge and the dogs -- Elizabeth Chesney Zegura. Laughing out loud in the Heptaméron: a reassessment of Marguerite de Navarre's ambivalent humor -- Lia B. Ross. You had to be there: the elusive humor of the Sottie -- Kyle Diroberto. Sacred parody in Robert Greene's Groatsworth of wit -- Martha Moffitt Peacock. The comedy of the shrew: theorizing humor in early modern Netherlandish art -- Jessica Tvordi. The comic personas of Milton's Prolusion VI: negotiating masculine identity through self-directed humor -- John Alexander. Ridentum dicere verum (using laughter to speak the truth): laughter and the language of the early modern clown "pickelhering" in German literature of the late seventeenth century (1675-1700) -- Thomas Willard. Andreae's ludibrium: Menippean satire in The chymische hochzeit -- Diane Rudall. The comic power of illusion-allusion -- Allison P. Coudert. Laughing at credulity and superstition in the long eighteenth century. (shrink)
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  19.  7
    Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.H. M. Kallen - 1912 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 9 (11):303-305.
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  20.  44
    Greek Laughter: A Study of Cultural Psychology From Homer to Early Christianity.Charles Platter - 2010 - American Journal of Philology 131 (3):529-532.
    In 1991, Stephen Halliwell published "The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture", an essay that, among other things, rejected totalizing definitions of laughter and the laughable in favor of a more nuanced view that emphasized a distinction between laughter perceived as friendly and non-consequential, i.e., not injurious to the reputation of anyone, and laughter seen as abusive, hostile, or belittling, and so deleterious to the reputation of the target. His point was not that laughter could (...)
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  21.  32
    Contagious Laughter: Laughter is a Sufficient Stimulus for Laughs and Smiles.Robert R. Provine - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (1):1-4.
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  22. Taking Laughter Seriously in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.Lydia L. Moland - 2018 - In All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. pp. 1-14.
    Philosophers in the nineteenth century took laughter and its related concepts very seriously. Most philosophers before this period treated laughter as tangential to philosophy’s core concerns, but beginning with Kant’s immediate successors, the family of concepts relating to the laughable—including comedy, wit, irony, and ridicule—took on new significance. They went from describing something derivative about humans to telling us what we, in the most basic sense, are. Well-known philosophers such as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche offered substantial treatments (...)
     
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  23. Laughter as Ethical and Theological Resistance: Leymah Gbowee, Sarah, and the Hidden Transcript.Jacqueline A. Bussie - 2015 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 69 (2):169-182.
    Through an analysis of Nobel Peace Prize winner Leymah Gbowee’s memoir, Mighty Be Our Powers, as well as the story of the biblical Sarah, this essay argues that laughter is a liberating means of ethical and theological resistance, a manifestation of the “hidden transcript” constructed by the marginalized to reclaim hope and dignity in the face of oppression’s radical negation and dehumanization. This essay also argues that laughter helps the suffering faithful resist despair, “Pollyannaism,” evil, either/or dichotomous thought, (...)
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  24. Laughter as a Semiotic Problem.V. A. Vershyna & O. V. Mykhailiuk - 2021 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 20:5-15.
    Purpose. The article is aimed to substantiate the view on the phenomenon of laughter as a subject of semiotic analysis, which leads to the following tasks: to reveal the possibilities of semiotics application in the study of laughter nature; to analyze the phenomenon of laughter as a cultural and natural phenomenon, as a sign and as an attribute; to consider the place of laughter in culture, which is understood as a sign system. Theoretical basis. The semiotic (...)
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  25.  2
    Canned Laughter.Joshua Gunn - 2014 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (4):434-454.
    This article argues that the example of laughter continues to trouble the human/machine binary that so many have troubled, from Descartes to Zupančič. Sounding various objects of “recorded” laughter through psychoanalytic tweeters, deconstructive warps, and object-oriented woofers implicates ontology as so much noise for the projection of certainty. Derivatively speaking, I argue for the primacy of a rhetorical ethics.
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  26.  7
    Foucault, Laughter, and Gendered Normalizatoin.Emily R. Douglas - 2015 - Foucault Studies 20:142-154.
    Thus far, little attention has been paid by Foucauldian scholars to the role of laughter in our subjectivation and normalization, nor to the possible roles of laughter practices in political resistance. Yet, there is a body of references to laughter in both Foucault’s own work and that of his contemporary commentators, subtly indicating that it might be a tool for challenging normalization through transgression. I seek to negotiate the different functions that our laughter practices can have, (...)
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  27.  26
    Holocaust Laughter and Edgar Hilsenrath’s The Nazi and the Barber : Towards a Critical Pedagogy of Laughter and Humor in Holocaust Education.Michalinos Zembylas - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (3):301-313.
    This article tries to defend the position that Holocaust Education can be enriched by appreciating laughter and humor as critical and transformative forces that not only challenge dominant discourses about the Holocaust and its representational limits, but also reclaim humanity, ethics, and difference from new angles and juxtapositions. Edgar Hilsenrath’s novel The Nazi and the Barber is discussed here as an example of literature that departs from representations of Holocaust as celebration of resilience and survival, portraying a world in (...)
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  28. Laughter and Pleasure.Karl Pfeifer - 1994 - Humor: International Journal of Humor Research 7 (2):157-172.
    Karl Pfeifer counters the thesis that laughter and pleasure are intimately connected with one another, and addresses the thesis of John Morreall (1982) that a pleasant psyohological shift is a causally necessary condition for laughter. A variety of examples suggesting that laughter does not have to have pleasure as its causal antecedent are presented. Imitative, nervous, hysterical, physiogenic, and acerbic laughter suggest that it is neither incoherent nor implausible to consider laughter as being caused by (...)
     
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  29. Roman Laughter. The Comedy of Plautus.L. Richardson & Erich Segal - 1970 - American Journal of Philology 91 (3):370.
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  30.  80
    Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism.Markus Gabriel - 2009 - Continuum.
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
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  31.  16
    Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Ancient Philosophy.Pierre Destrée & Franco V. Trivigno (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    "Ancient philosophers were very interested in the themes of laughter, humor and comedy. They theorized about laughter and its causes, moralized about the appropriate uses of humor and what it is appropriate to laugh at, and wrote treaties on comedic composition. Further, they were often merciless in ridiculing their opponents' positions, often borrowing comedic devices and techniques from comic poetry and drama to do so. The volume is organized around three themes that were important for ancient philosophers: the (...)
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  32. Democratizing Laughter.J. G. York - 2012 - Philosophical Studies in Education 43:73 - 83.
     
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  33.  16
    Liberty, Laughter, and Tears: Reflections on the Relations of Comedy and Tragedy to Human Freedom.Horace Meyer Kallen - 1968 - De Kalb, Northern Illinois University Press.
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  34.  6
    Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi.Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.) - 2010 - Verlag Karl Alber.
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  35.  19
    The laughter of the Thracian handmaid. About the unworldliness of philosophy.Christina Schues - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):15-31.
    Interpreting Plato's story of the Thracian handmaid, this essay focuses on questions concerning the supposition of an opposition between common sense and philosophical thinking. Taking the laughter of the maid seriously the author discusses the role of laughter for Plato's approach. By reevaluating the function of laughter she argues for its strength in revealing ideological thinking or an undisclosed hypothesis, and in enabling philosophical thinking. Thus, the author argues that the alliance of laughter and thinking unsettles (...)
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  36.  11
    Even Laughter? From Laughter in the Magic Theater to the Laughter Assembly Line.Anca Parvulescu - 2017 - Critical Inquiry 43 (2):506-527.
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  37.  34
    Philosophical Laughter: Vichian Remarks on Umberto Eco’s The Name of the Rose.Donald Phillip Verene - 1984 - New Vico Studies 2:75.
  38. Divine Laughter.J. Elof Boodin - 1933 - Hibbert Journal 32:572.
     
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  39. Laughter Between Distraction and Awakening : Marxist Themes in The Office (US).Michael Bray - 2008 - In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell.
     
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  40.  2
    Laughter and Play in Plato’s Gorgias.Georgia Sermamoglou-Soulmaidi - 2019 - Hermes 147 (4):406.
    This paper aims to show that laughter and play are employed as interconnected motifs with a specific function in Plato's Gorgias. I argue that the repeated and seemingly disconnected references to things identified as laughable and to attitudes identified as playful are in fact a systematic attempt to call into question conventional assumptions about the role of philosophy in general and the occasionally playful attitude of Socrates in particular. Socrates – and philosophy – may appear laughable, but the truly (...)
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  41.  15
    Comic Laughter[REVIEW]D. C. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (2):310-310.
    Explaining and classifying attitudes and art forms related to comic laughter, Swabey defends the kind of comic laughter which perceives the laughable as less than the perfect and true. Bad or false pretenders to "comedy" or humor, e.g., apparently all modern art reputed to be comic and playful, are rather bitterly scolded. The thesis might have been more credibly argued if more positive examples had been used.--C. D.
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  42.  32
    Hobbes on Laughter.R. E. Ewin - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):29-40.
    Hobbes' concern when he writes about laughter is a nameless passion, one of the possible responses we can have to somebody's perceived inferiority when they have acted in a way calculated to dishonour us. 'Of great minds, one of the proper works, is to help and free others from scorn', so great minds will not be given to much of such laughter. It is not the laughter that is of concern to Hobbes, but the passion that the (...)
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  43.  32
    Laughter, Freshness, and Titillation.Karl Pfeifer - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):307 – 322.
    Robert C. Roberts's suggestion that the conditions for laughter at humor (e.g. jokes) can best be captured with a notion of freshness, as opposed to surprise, is pursued. The relationship freshness has to setup and surprise is clarified, and the place of freshness within a larger system of structuring metaphors is alluded to. The question of whether freshness can also cover laughter at the nonhumorous (e.g. tickling) is then taken up, it being determined that such coverage is possible (...)
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  44.  5
    Laughter on the Fringes: The Reception of Old Comedy in the Imperial Greek World by Anna Peterson.Eleni Bozia - 2020 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (4):501-502.
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  45. Influencing Laughter with AI-Mediated Communication.Gregory Mills, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Chris Howes & Vladislav Maraev - 2021 - Interaction Studies 22 (3):416-463.
    Previous experimental findings support the hypothesis that laughter and positive emotions are contagious in face-to-face and mediated communication. To test this hypothesis, we describe four experiments in which participants communicate via a chat tool that artificially adds or removes laughter, without participants being aware of the manipulation. We found no evidence to support the contagion hypothesis. However, artificially exposing participants to more lols decreased participants’ use of hahas but led to more involvement and improved task-performance. Similarly, artificially exposing (...)
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  46.  42
    The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture.Stephen Halliwell - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):279-.
    The proposition that man is the only animal capable of laughter is at least as old as Aristotle . In a strictly physical sense, this is probably false; but it is undoubtedly true that as a psychologically expressive and socially potent means of communication, laughter is a distinctively human phenomenon. Any attempt to study sets of cultural attitudes towards laughter, or the particular types of personal conduct which these attitudes shape and influence, must certainly adopt a wider (...)
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  47. Laughter, Hope and a Sock in the Eye! A, Retrospective of the Life of Dorothy Parker.Eibhlín Inglesby - 1996 - Feminist Theology 4 (12):105-122.
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  48. " Red Laughter": On Refined Weapons of Soviet Jesters.Serguei Alex Oushakine - 2012 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 79 (1):189-216.
     
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  49. Comic Laughter.Marie Taylor Swabey - 1961 - Archon Books.
     
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  50.  13
    Taking Laughter Seriously in Augustine’s Confessions.Justin Shaun Coyle - 2018 - Augustinian Studies 49 (1):65-86.
    This essay analyzes the subtle theology of laughter that is scattered across Augustine’s Confessiones. First, I draw on Sarah Byers’s work in order to argue that Augustine adopts and adapts Stoic moral psychology as a means of sorting the laugh into two moral kinds—as evidence of either good joy or bad joy. In turn, these two kinds provide the loose structure for the double theological taxonomy of merciless and merciful laughter that conf. develops. Next, I treat laughter (...)
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