Results for 'international law'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. British International Law Cases a Collection of Decisions of Courts in the British Isles on Points of International Law. --.Clive Parry, J. A. Hopkins, International Law Fund & British Institute of International and Comparative Law - 1963 - Stevens.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  31
    International Law and Political Philosophy: Uncovering New Linkages.Steven Ratner - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (2):e12564.
    Despite a common agenda of normative analysis of the international order, philosophical work on international political morality and international law and legal scholarship have, until recently, worked at a distance from one another.The mutual suspicion can be traced to different aims and methodologies, including a divide between work on matters of deep structure, on the one hand, and practical institutional analysis and prescription, on the other. Yet international law is a key part of the normative practices (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  3
    International Law as We Know It: Cyberwar Discourse and the Construction of Knowledge in International Legal Scholarship.Lianne J. M. Boer - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    International legal scholars tend to think of their work as the interpretation of rules: the application of a law 'out there' to concrete situations. This book takes a different approach to that scholarship: it views doctrine as a socio-linguistic practice. In other words, this book views legal scholars not as law-appliers, but as constructing knowledge within a particular academic discipline. By means of three close-ups of the discourse on cyberwar and international law, this book shows how international (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. International Law and Morality in the Theory of Secession.David Copp - 1998 - The Journal of Ethics 2 (3):219-245.
    In order responsibly to decide whether there ought to be an international legal right of secession, I believe we need an account of the morality of secession. I propose that territorial and political societies have a moral right to secede, and on that basis I propose a regime designed to give such groups an international legal right to secede. This regime would create a procedure that could be followed by groups desiring to secede or by states desiring to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5. A Philosophy of International Law.Fernando R. Tesón - 1998 - Westview Press.
    Why should sovereign states obey international law? What compels them to owe allegiance to a higher set of rules when each country is its own law of the land? What is the basis of their obligations to each other? Conventional wisdom suggests that countries are too different from one another culturally to follow laws out of mere loyalty to each other or a set of shared moral values. Surely, the prevailing view holds, countries act simply out of self-interest, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  6.  37
    International Law, Social Change and Resistance: A Conversation Between Professor Anna Grear (Cardiff) and Professorial Fellow Dianne Otto.Dianne Otto & Anna Grear - 2018 - Feminist Legal Studies 26 (3):351-363.
    This conversation between two scholars of international law focuses on the contemporary realities of feminist analysis of international law and on current and future spaces of resistance. It notes that feminism has moved from the margin towards the centre, but that this has also come at a cost. As the language of women’s rights and gender equality has travelled into the international policy worlds of crisis management and peace and security, feminist scholars need to become more careful (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  11
    International Law and World Order a Critique of Contemporary Approaches.B. S. Chimni - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    In International Law and World Order, B. S. Chimni articulates an integrated Marxist approach to international law combining the insights of Marxism, socialist feminism and postcolonial theory. The book uses IMAIL to systematically and critically examine the most influential contemporary theories of international law including new, feminist, realist and policy-oriented approaches. In doing so, it discusses a range of themes relating to the history, structure and process of international law. The book also considers crucial world order (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. The Philosophy of International Law.Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    The other contributions address philosophical problems arising in specific domains of international law, such as human rights law, international economic law, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  9. International Law and the Limits of Global Justice.S. Meckled-Garcia - 2011 - Review of International Studies 37 (5):2073-2088.
    There are limits to what can be achieved using the means and medium of international law. This article explores those limits by providing an innovative theory of the nature of international law and how we should understand its limits in terms of value theory. A "four functions" theory is proposed, and these functions are used to interpret areas of international law in terms of their distinctive and valuable contribution to a specific area of human relations. On the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  36
    The Limits of International Law.Jack L. Goldsmith - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    A theory of customary international law -- Case studies -- A theory of international agreements -- Human rights -- International trade -- A theory of international rhetoric -- International law and moral obligation -- Liberal democracy and cosmopolitan duty.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  11.  23
    International Law and Theories of Global Justice.Steven Ratner, David Luban, Carmen Pavel, Jiewuh Song & James Stewart - unknown
    International law informs, and is informed by, concerns for global justice. Yet the two fields that engage most with prescribing the normative structure of the world order – international law and the philosophy of global justice – have tended to work on parallel tracks. Many international lawyers, with their commitment to formal sources, regard considerations of substantive justice as ultra vires for much of their work. Philosophers of global justice, in turn, tend to explore the moral commitments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Law, Justice and the State Nordic Perspectives : Proceedings of the 16th World Congress of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy , Reykjavík, 26 May-2 June, 1993. [REVIEW]Mikael M. International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy, Karlsson & Ólafur Páll Jónsson - 1995
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  28
    Internal Laws of Probability, Generalized Likelihoods and Lewis' Infinitesimal Chances–a Response to Adam Elga.Frederik Herzberg - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (1):25-43.
    The rejection of an infinitesimal solution to the zero-fit problem by A. Elga ([2004]) does not seem to appreciate the opportunities provided by the use of internal finitely-additive probability measures. Indeed, internal laws of probability can be used to find a satisfactory infinitesimal answer to many zero-fit problems, not only to the one suggested by Elga, but also to the Markov chain (that is, discrete and memory-less) models of reality. Moreover, the generalization of likelihoods that Elga has in mind is (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  14. Fairness in International Law and Institutions.Thomas M. Franck - 1995 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book is based on Professor Franck's highly acclaimed Hague Academy General Course. In it he offers a compelling view of the future of international legal reasoning and legal theory. The author offers a critical analysis of the prescriptive norms and institutions of modern international law and argues that international law has the capacity to advance, in practice, the abstract social values shared by the community of states and persons. This book is both thought-provoking and original and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  15.  4
    International Law Theories: An Inquiry Into Different Ways of Thinking.Andrea Bianchi - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Two fish are swimming in a pond. "Do you know what?" the fish asks his friend. "No, tell me." "I was talking to a frog the other day. And he told me that we are surrounded by water!" His friend looks at him with great scepticism: "Water? What's that? Show me some water!"This book is an attempt to stir up 'the water' the two fish are swimming in. It analyses the different theoretical approaches to international law and invites readers (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law.Allen E. Buchanan - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   144 citations  
  17. International Law and Human Plurality in the Shadow of Totalitarianism: Hannah Arendt and Raphael Lemkin.Seyla Benhabib - 2009 - Constellations 16 (2):331-350.
  18.  38
    Kant, International Law, and the Problem of Humanitarian Intervention.Antonio Franceschet - 2010 - Journal of International Political Theory 6 (1):1-22.
    International law has one principal mechanism for settling the legality of humanitarian interventions, the United Nations Security Council's power to authorise coercion. However, this is hardly satisfactory in practice and has failed to provide a more secure juridical basis for determining significant conflicts among states over when humanitarian force is justified. This article argues that, in spite of Immanuel Kant's limited analysis of intervention, and his silence on humanitarian intervention, his political theory provides the elements of a compelling analysis (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  64
    International Law and the Search for Universal Principles in Journalism Ethics.Michael Perkins - 2002 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 17 (3):193-208.
    International human rights law that protects freedom of the press provides a cross-culturally reliable foundation from which to launch a consideration of universal principles in journalism ethics. After examining certain assumptions made by the international law about individuals and about the kind of journalism the law intends to protect, in this article I propose that truthtelling, independence, and freedom with responsibility are universal ethical principles international law envisions for journalists. These principles would undoubtedly be applied differentially in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20.  55
    Reparations, International Law and Global Justice: A New Frontier.Richard Falk - 2006 - In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press. pp. 478--503.
    This paper assesses recent trends in international law regarding the availability and character of reparations. Presently, reparations issues have arisen particularly in domestic societies searching for transitional justice in the aftermath of authoritarian rule. These issues are shaped by national legal systems, but are also influenced by international practice. In these transitional settings, the search for justice is affected by political preoccupations such as the persistent influence of displaced prior authoritarian leadership as well as by real and alleged (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21.  15
    International Law, Institutional Moral Reasoning, and Secession.David Lefkowitz - 2018 - Law and Philosophy 37 (4):385-413.
    This paper argues for the superiority of international law’s existing ban on unilateral secession over its reform to include either a primary or remedial right to secession. I begin by defending the claim that secession is an inherently institutional concept, and that therefore we ought to employ institutional moral reasoning to defend or criticize specific proposals regarding a right to secede. I then respond to the objection that at present we lack the empirical evidence necessary to sustain any specific (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  2
    Philosophy and International Law: A Critical Introduction.David Lefkowitz - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Philosophy and International Law, David Lefkowitz examines core questions of legal and political philosophy through critical reflection on contemporary international law. Is international law really law? The answer depends on what makes law. Does the existence of law depend on coercive enforcement? Or institutions such as courts? Or fidelity to the requirements of the rule of law? Or conformity to moral standards? Answers to these questions are essential for determining the truth or falsity of international (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  1
    Space and Fates of International Law: Between Leibniz and Hobbes.Ekaterina Yahyaoui Krivenko - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    The book offers the first analysis of the influence exercised by the concept of space on the emergence and continuing operation of international law. By adopting a historical perspective and analysing work of two central early modern thinkers – Leibniz and Hobbes – it offers a significant addition to a limited range of resources on early modern history of international law. The book traces links between concepts of space, universality, human cognition, law, and international law in these (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  1
    International Law and the Possibility of a Just World Order: An Essay on Hegel’s Universalism.Steven V. Hicks (ed.) - 1999 - Brill | Rodopi.
    This book examines the concepts of international law and international relations as they are developed in the social and political philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel. Hegel has a vision of a single modern social world, in which peoples and nation-states can co-exist under conditions of peace, justice, mutual respect, and prosperity.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  32
    Is International Law Impartial?Steven R. Ratner - 2005 - Legal Theory 11 (1):39-74.
  26.  20
    Conceptualizing Corporate Accountability in International Law: Models for a Business and Human Rights Treaty.Nadia Bernaz - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):45-64.
    This article conceptualizes corporate accountability under international law and introduces an analytical framework translating corporate accountability into seven core elements. Using this analytical framework, it then systematically assesses four models that could be used in a future business and human rights treaty: the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights model, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights model, the progressive model, and the transformative model. It aims to contribute to the BHR treaty negotiation process by clarifying different (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  2
    International Law as a Profession.Jean D'Aspremont, Tarcisio Gazzini, André Nollkaemper & Wouter Werner (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    International law is not merely a set of rules or processes, but is a professional activity practised by a diversity of figures, including scholars, judges, counsel, teachers, legal advisers and activists. Individuals may, in different contexts, play more than one of these roles, and the interactions between them are illuminating of the nature of international law itself. This collection of innovative, multidisciplinary and self-reflective essays reveals a bilateral process whereby, on the one hand, the professionalisation of international (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Human Rights, Legitimacy, and International Law.John Tasioulas - 2013 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 58 (1):1-25.
    The article begins with reflections on the nature, and basis, of human rights considered as moral standards. It recommends an orthodox view of their nature, as moral rights possessed by all human beings simply in virtue of their humanity and discoverable through the workings of natural reason, that makes them strongly continuous with natural rights. It then offers some criticisms of recent attempts to depart from orthodoxy by explicating human rights by reference to the supposedly constitutive connection they bear to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  29.  66
    International Law as Political Theology: How to Read Nomos der Erde?Martti Koskenniemi - 2004 - Constellations 11 (4):492-511.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. Mobilising International Law for 'Global Justice'.Jeff Handmaker & Karin Arts (eds.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Mobilising International Law for 'Global Justice' provides new insights into the dynamics between politics and international law and the roles played by state and civic actors in pursuing human rights, development, security and justice through mobilising international law at local and international levels. This includes attempts to hold states, corporations or individuals accountable for violations of international law. Second, this book examines how enforcing international law creates particular challenges for intergovernmental regulators seeking to manage (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  14
    Is International Law a Hartian Legal System?Carmen E. Pavel - 2018 - Ratio Juris 31 (3):307-325.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  81
    Morality, Care, and International Law.Virginia Held - 2011 - Ethics and Global Politics 4 (3):173-194.
    Whether we should respect international law is in dispute. In the United States, international law is dismissed by the left as merely promoting the interests of powerful states. It is attacked by the right as irrelevant and an interference with the interests and mission of the United States. And it follows from the arguments of many liberals that in the absence of world government the world is in a Hobbesian state of nature and international law inapplicable. This (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. Riddle of All Constitutions: International Law, Democracy, and the Critique of Ideology.Susan R. Marks - 2000 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book examines current debates about the emergence of an international legal norm of democratic governance and also considers some of the wider theoretical issues to which those debates give rise. It asks; should international law seek to promote democratic political arrangements? If so, on what basis, and using which of the many competing conceptions of democracy?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34.  22
    Legitimate Actors of International Law-Making: Towards a Theory of International Democratic Representation.Samantha Besson & José Luis Martí - 2018 - Jurisprudence 9 (3):504-540.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the identity of the legitimate actors of international law-making from the perspective of democratic theory. It argues that both states or state-based international organisations, and civil society actors should be considered complementary legitimate actors of international law-making. Unlike previous accounts, our proposed model of representation, the Multiple Representation Model, is based on an expanded, democratic understanding of the principle of state participation: it is specifically designed to palliate the democratic deficits of more common versions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  2
    International Law on the Left: Re-Examining Marxist Legacies.Susan Marks (ed.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Against expectations that the turn away from state socialism would likewise initiate a turn away from Marxist thought, recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in Marxism and its reassessment by a new generation of theorists. This book pursues that interest with specific reference to international law. It presents a sustained and fascinating exploration of the pertinence of Marxist ideas, concepts and analytical practices for international legal enquiry from a range of angles. Essays consider the relationship between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. International Law and International Relations: An International Organization Reader.Beth A. Simmons & Richard H. Steinberg (eds.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 2007 volume is intended to help readers understand the relationship between international law and international relations. As a testament to this dynamic area of inquiry, new research on IL/IR is now being published in a growing list of traditional law reviews and disciplinary journals. The excerpted articles in this volume, all of which were first published in International Organization, represent some of the most important research since serious social science scholarship began in this area more than (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  1
    International Law as Behavior.Harlan Grant Cohen & Timothy Meyer (eds.) - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume includes chapters from an exciting group of scholars at the cutting edge of their fields to present a multi-disciplinary look at how international law shapes behavior. Contributors present overviews of the progress established fields have made in analyzing questions of interest, as well as speculations on the questions or insights that emerging methods might raise. In some chapters, there is a focus on how a particular method might raise or help answer questions, while others focus on a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. A New Philosophy for International Law.Ronald Dworkin - 2013 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (1):2-30.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  39.  6
    International Law in Antiquity.S. C. Todd & D. J. Bederman - 2002 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 122:181-182.
  40. The Constitutionalization of International Law and the Legitimation Problems of a Constitution for World Society.Jürgen Habermas - 2008 - Constellations 15 (4):444-455.
  41.  34
    Feminist Scholarship on International Law in the 1990s and Today: An Inter-Generational Conversation.Hilary Charlesworth, Gina Heathcote & Emily Jones - 2019 - Feminist Legal Studies 27 (1):79-93.
    The world of international relations and law is constantly changing. There is a risk of the systematic undermining of international organisations and law over the next years. Feminist approaches to international law will need to adapt accordingly, to ensure that they continue to challenge inequalities, and serve as an important and critical voice in international law. This article seeks to tell the story of feminist perspectives on international law from the early 1990s till today through (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. International Law and its Others.Anne Orford (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Institutional and political developments since the end of the Cold War have led to a revival of public interest in, and anxiety about, international law. Liberal international law is appealed to as offering a means of constraining power and as representing universal values. This book brings together scholars who draw on jurisprudence, philosophy, legal history and political theory to analyse the stakes of this turn towards international law. Contributors explore the history of relations between international law (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  13
    International Law as Language—Towards a “Neo” New Haven School.Jared Wessel - 2010 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (2):123-144.
    This paper examines the tension between the mainstream belief in international law as a source of objectivity distinct from politics and its new stream critics that question the validity of such a distinction. It is argued that, as a type of language, international law is not distinct from politics as a function of objectivity, but rather by the fact that it serves the international community’s thymos. The phenomena of global administrative law and NATO’s use of force in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  5
    International Law, COVID-19 and Feminist Engagement with the United Nations Security Council: The End of the Affair?Catherine O’Rourke - 2020 - Feminist Legal Studies 28 (3):321-328.
    The gendered implications of COVID-19, in particular in terms of gender-based violence and the gendered division of care work, have secured some prominence, and ignited discussion about prospects for a ‘feminist recovery’. In international law terms, feminist calls for a response to the pandemic have privileged the United Nations Security Council, conditioned—I argue—by two decades of the pursuit of the Women, Peace and Security agenda through the UNSC. The deficiencies of the UNSC response, as characterised by the Resolution 2532 (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  1
    International Law and Empire: Historical Explorations.Martti Koskenniemi, Walter Rech & Manuel Jiménez Fonseca (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press UK.
    By examining the relationship between international law and empire from early modernity to the present, this volume aims at deepening current understandings of the way international legal institutions, practices, and narratives have shaped specifically imperial ideas about and structures of world governance.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. International Law.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2016 - Madison, WI, USA: Philosophypedia.
    A case is made that so-called international law is law in name only and, moreover, that although bona fide international law is theoretically possible, it would not be desirable.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. International Law and Psychology: Two Studies: The Intrusion of Order [and] Conscience and Society.Ranyard West - 1974 - Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., Oceana Publications.
  48. International Law and Psychology: Two Studies: The Intrusion of Order [and] Conscience and Society.Ranyard West - 1974 - Dobbs Ferry, N.Y : Oceana Publications ; Leiden : A. W. Sijthoff.
  49. Sex Trafficking: Trends, Challenges, and the Limitations of International Law. [REVIEW]Heather M. Smith - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (3):271-286.
    The passage of the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children in 2000 marked the first global effort to address human trafficking in 50 years. Since the passage of the UN Protocol international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individual states have devoted significant resources to eliminating human trafficking. This article critically examines the impact of these efforts with reference to the trends, political, and empirical challenges in data collection and the limitations of (...) law. I argue that current international law disproportionately addresses the criminal prosecution of traffickers at the expense of trafficking victims’ human rights, and has therefore not yet reached its full potential in the fight against human sex trafficking. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50. Fairness in International Law and Institutions.Thomas M. Franck - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book is based on Professor Franck's highly acclaimed Hague Academy General Course. In it he offers a compelling view of the future of international legal reasoning and legal theory. The author offers a critical analysis of the prescriptive norms and institutions of modern international law and argues that international law has the capacity to advance, in practice, the abstract social values shared by the community of states and persons. This book is both thought-provoking and original and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000