Results for 'healthcare'

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  1.  41
    Automated opioid risk scores: a case for machine learning-induced epistemic injustice in healthcare.Giorgia Pozzi - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (1):1-12.
    Artificial intelligence-based (AI) technologies such as machine learning (ML) systems are playing an increasingly relevant role in medicine and healthcare, bringing about novel ethical and epistemological issues that need to be timely addressed. Even though ethical questions connected to epistemic concerns have been at the center of the debate, it is going unnoticed how epistemic forms of injustice can be ML-induced, specifically in healthcare. I analyze the shortcomings of an ML system currently deployed in the USA to predict (...)
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  2.  20
    Preventive Ethics and Rural Healthcare: Addressing Issues on a Systems Level.Anthony Vernillo - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):61-62.
  3.  32
    Potential for epistemic injustice in evidence-based healthcare policy and guidance.Jonathan Anthony Michaels - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):417-422.
    The rapid development in healthcare technologies in recent years has resulted in the need for health services, whether publicly funded or insurance based, to identify means to maximise the benefits and provide equitable distribution of limited resources. This has resulted in the need for rationing decisions, and there has been considerable debate regarding the substantive and procedural ethical principles that promote distributive justice when making such decisions. In this paper, I argue that while the scientifically rigorous approaches of evidence-based (...)
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  4.  33
    Green bioethics, patient autonomy and informed consent in healthcare.David B. Resnik & Jonathan Pugh - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (7):489-493.
    Green bioethics is an area of research and scholarship that examines the impact of healthcare practices and policies on the environment and emphasises environmental values, such as ecological sustainability and stewardship. Some green bioethicists have argued that healthcare providers should inform patients about the environmental impacts of treatments and advocate for options that minimise adverse impacts. While disclosure of information pertaining to the environmental impacts of treatments could facilitate autonomous decision-making and strengthen the patient–provider relationship in situations where (...)
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  5.  62
    Conscientious objection and healthcare in the UK: why tribunals are not the answer.Christopher Cowley - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):69-72.
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  6. A framework for luck egalitarianism in health and healthcare.Andreas Albertsen & Carl Knight - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):165-169.
    Several attempts have been made to apply the choice-sensitive theory of distributive justice, luck egalitarianism, in the context of health and healthcare. This article presents a framework for this discussion by highlighting different normative decisions to be made in such an application, some of the objections to which luck egalitarians must provide answers and some of the practical implications associated with applying such an approach in the real world. It is argued that luck egalitarians should address distributions of health (...)
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  7.  9
    A last resort? A scoping review of patient and healthcare worker attitudes toward strike action.Ryan Essex, Calvin Burns, Thomas Rhys Evans, Georgina Hudson, Austin Parsons & Sharon Marie Weldon - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (2):e12535.
    While strike action has been common since the industrial revolution, it often invokes a passionate and polarising response, from the strikers themselves, from employers, governments and the general public. Support or lack thereof from health workers and the general public is an important consideration in the justification of strike action. This systematic review sought to examine the impact of strike action on patient and clinician attitudes, specifically to explore (1) patient and health worker support for strike action and (2) the (...)
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  8.  53
    How to avoid unfair discrimination against disabled patients in healthcare resource allocation.Sean Sinclair - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):158-162.
    The paper proposes a new method of researching public opinion for the purposes of valuing the outcomes of healthcare interventions. The issue I address is that, under the quality-adjusted life-year system, disabled patients face a higher cost-effectiveness hurdle than able-bodied patients. This seems inequitable. The author considers the alternative approaches to valuing healthcare interventions that have been proposed, and shows that all of them face the same problem. It is proposed that to value an outcome, instead of researching (...)
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  9.  34
    Knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare ethics among resident doctors and ward nurses from a resource poor setting, Nepal.Samaj Adhikari, Kumar Paudel, Arja R. Aro, Tara Ballav Adhikari, Bipin Adhikari & Shiva Raj Mishra - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):68.
    BackgroundHealthcare ethics is neglected in clinical practice in LMICs such as Nepal. The main objective of this study was to assess the current status of knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare ethics among resident doctors and ward nurses in a tertiary teaching hospital in Nepal.MethodsThis was a cross sectional study conducted among resident doctors and ward nurses in the largest tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal during January- February 2016 with a self-administered questionnaire. A Cramer’s V value was assessed (...)
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  10.  27
    Important outcomes of moral case deliberation: a Euro-MCD field survey of healthcare professionals’ priorities.Mia Svantesson, Janine C. de Snoo-Trimp, Göril Ursin, Henrica C. W. de Vet, Berit S. Brinchmann & Bert Molewijk - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):608-616.
    BackgroundThere is a lack of empirical research regarding the outcomes of such clinical ethics support methods as moral case deliberation. Empirical research in how healthcare professionals perceive potential outcomes is needed in order to evaluate the value and effectiveness of ethics support; and help to design future outcomes research. The aim was to use the European Moral Case Deliberation Outcome Instrument instrument to examine the importance of various MCD outcomes, according to healthcare professionals, prior to participation.MethodsA North European (...)
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  11.  26
    Communication of patients’ and family members’ ethical concerns to their healthcare providers.Mariam Noorulhuda, Christine Grady, Paul Wakim, Talia Bernhard, Hae Lin Cho & Marion Danis - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-9.
    Background Little is known about communication between patients, families, and healthcare providers regarding ethical concerns that patients and families experience in the course of illness and medical care. To address this gap in the literature, we surveyed patients and family members to learn about their ethical concerns and the extent to which they discussed them with their healthcare providers. Methods We surveyed adult, English-speaking patients and family members receiving inpatient care in five hospitals in the Washington DC-Baltimore metropolitan (...)
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  12.  14
    Verification and trust in healthcare.Edwin Jesudason - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (3):223-224.
    ‘Trust but verify’ is a translation of a Russian proverb made famous by former US President Ronald Reagan. In their paper, Grahamet alappear to take an alternate view that might be summarised astrust or verify. The contrast highlights a general question: how do we come to trust in authorities? More specifically, Grahamet alclaim: (1) that UK Trusted Research Environments (TREs) are misnamed as future custodians for big health data because their promised verification systems actually negate the uncertainty that trust requires; (...)
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  13.  27
    The Costs of Institutional Racism and its Ethical Implications for Healthcare.Amanuel Elias & Yin Paradies - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):45-58.
    This paper discusses the ethical implications of racism and some of the various costs associated with racism occurring at the institutional level. We argue that, in many ways, the laws, social structures, and institutions in Western society have operated to perpetuate the continuation of historical legacies of racial inequities with or without the intention of individuals and groups in society. By merely maintaining existing structures, laws, and social norms, society can impose social, economic, and health costs on racial minorities that (...)
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  14.  25
    The use of digital twins in healthcare: socio-ethical benefits and socio-ethical risks.Marc-Jeroen Bogaardt, Elsje Oosterkamp, Mireille van Hilten & Eugen Octav Popa - 2021 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 17 (1):1-25.
    Anticipating the ethical impact of emerging technologies is an essential part of responsible innovation. One such emergent technology is the digital twin which we define here as a living replica of a physical system (human or non-human). A digital twin combines various emerging technologies such as AI, Internet of Things, big data and robotics, each component bringing its own socio-ethical issues to the resulting artefacts. The question thus arises which of these socio-ethical themes surface in the process and how they (...)
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  15.  56
    Youth should decide: the principle of subsidiarity in paediatric transgender healthcare.Florence Ashley - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (2):110-114.
    Drawing on the principle of subsidiarity, this article develops a framework for allocating medical decision-making authority in the absence of capacity to consent and argues that decisional authority in paediatric transgender healthcare should generally lie in the patient. Regardless of patients’ capacity, there is usually nobody better positioned to make medical decisions that go to the heart of a patient’s identity than the patients themselves. Under the principle of subsidiarity, decisional authority should only be held by a higher level (...)
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  16.  22
    Perceptions of important outcomes of moral case deliberations: a qualitative study among healthcare professionals in childhood cancer care.Charlotte Weiner, Pernilla Pergert, Bert Molewijk, Anders Castor & Cecilia Bartholdson - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundIn childhood cancer care, healthcare professionals must deal with several difficult moral situations in clinical practice. Previous studies show that morally difficult challenges are related to decisions on treatment limitations, infringing on the child's integrity and growing autonomy, and interprofessional conflicts. Research also shows that healthcare professionals have expressed a need for clinical ethics support to help them deal with morally difficult situations. Moral case deliberations (MCDs) are one example of ethics support. The aim of this study was (...)
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  17.  13
    The Ethics of Overlapping Relationships in Rural and Remote Healthcare. A Narrative Review.Rafael Thomas Osik Szumer & Mark Arnold - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (2):181-190.
    It is presently unclear whether a distinct “rural ethics” of navigating professional boundaries exists, and if so, what theoretical approaches may assist practitioners to manage overlapping relationships. To be effective clinicians while concurrently partaking in community life, practitioners must develop and maintain safe, ethical, and sustainable therapeutic relationships in rural and remote healthcare. A narrative review was conducted identifying a significant body of qualitative and theoretical literature which explores the pervasiveness of dual relationships for practitioners working in rural and (...)
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  18.  33
    Levinas's ethics as a basis of healthcare – challenges and dilemmas.Birgit Nordtug - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (1):51-63.
    Levinas's ethics has in the last decades exerted a significant influence on Nursing and Caring Science. The core of Levinas's ethics – his analyses of how our subjectivity is established in the ethical encounter with our neighbour or the Other – is applied both to healthcare practice and in the project of building an identity of Nursing and Caring Science. Levinas's analyses are highly abstract and metaphysical, and also non‐normative. Thus, his analyses cannot be applied directly to practical problems (...)
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  19.  19
    Can United States Healthcare Become Environmentally Sustainable? Towards Green Healthcare Reform.Cristina Richie - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (4):643-652.
    In 2014, the United States health care industry produced an estimated 480 million metric tons of carbon dioxide ; nearly 8% of the country's total emissions. The importance of sustainability in health care — as a business reliant on fossil fuels for transportation, energy, and operational functioning — is slowly being recognized. These efforts to green health care are incomplete, since they only focus on health care structures. The therapeutic relationship is the essence of health care — not the buildings (...)
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  20.  47
    Mistrust and inconsistency during COVID-19: considerations for resource allocation guidelines that prioritise healthcare workers.Alexander T. M. Cheung & Brendan Parent - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):73-77.
    As the USA contends with another surge in COVID-19 cases, hospitals may soon need to answer the unresolved question of who lives and dies when ventilator demand exceeds supply. Although most triage policies in the USA have seemingly converged on the use of clinical need and benefit as primary criteria for prioritisation, significant differences exist between institutions in how to assign priority to patients with identical medical prognoses: the so-called ‘tie-breaker’ situations. In particular, one’s status as a frontline healthcare (...)
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  21.  53
    Moral Learning in an Integrated Social and Healthcare Service Network.Merel Visse, Guy A. M. Widdershoven & Tineke A. Abma - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):281-296.
    The traditional organizational boundaries between healthcare, social work, police and other non-profit organizations are fading and being replaced by new relational patterns among a variety of disciplines. Professionals work from their own history, role, values and relationships. It is often unclear who is responsible for what because this new network structure requires rules and procedures to be re-interpreted and re-negotiated. A new moral climate needs to be developed, particularly in the early stages of integrated services. Who should do what, (...)
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  22.  35
    Involuntary Commitment as “Carceral-Health Service”: From Healthcare-to-Prison Pipeline to a Public Health Abolition Praxis.Rafik Wahbi & Leo Beletsky - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):23-30.
    Involuntary commitment links the healthcare, public health, and legislative systems to act as a “carceral health-service.” While masquerading as more humane and medicalized, such coercive modalities nevertheless further reinforce the systems, structures, practices, and policies of structural oppression and white supremacy. We argue that due to involuntary commitment’s inextricable connection to the carceral system, and a longer history of violent social control, this legal framework cannot and must not be held out as a viable alternative to the criminal legal (...)
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  23.  37
    Stress and Turnover Intentions Within Healthcare Teams: The Mediating Role of Psychological Safety, and the Moderating Effect of COVID-19 Worry and Supervisor Support.Melany Hebles, Francisco Trincado-Munoz & Karina Ortega - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Employees at healthcare organizations are experiencing more stress than ever given the current COVID-19 pandemic. Different types of stress are affecting diverse organizational outcomes, including the employees’ voluntary turnover. This is the case of cognitive stress, a type of stress that affects how individuals process information, which can influence employees’ turnover intentions. In this study, we look at the mechanisms that can reduce the adverse effects of cognitive stress on turnover intentions, particularly the role of employees’ perceived psychological safety. (...)
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  24.  53
    How patients experience respect in healthcare: findings from a qualitative study among multicultural women living with HIV.Sofia B. Fernandez, Alya Ahmad, Mary Catherine Beach, Melissa K. Ward, Michele Jean-Gilles, Gladys Ibañez, Robert Ladner & Mary Jo Trepka - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-12.
    Background Respect is essential to providing high quality healthcare, particularly for groups that are historically marginalized and stigmatized. While ethical principles taught to health professionals focus on patient autonomy as the object of respect for persons, limited studies explore patients’ views of respect. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of a multiculturally diverse group of low-income women living with HIV (WLH) regarding their experience of respect from their medical physicians. Methods We analyzed 57 semi-structured interviews (...)
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  25.  9
    Objection to Conscience: An Argument Against Conscience Exemptions in Healthcare.Alberto Giubilini - 2016 - Bioethics 31 (5):400-408.
    I argue that appeals to conscience do not constitute reasons for granting healthcare professionals exemptions from providing services they consider immoral (e.g. abortion). My argument is based on a comparison between a type of objection that many people think should be granted, i.e. to abortion, and one that most people think should not be granted, i.e. to antibiotics. I argue that there is no principled reason in favour of conscientious objection qua conscientious that allows to treat these two cases (...)
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  26.  13
    Ethical concerns when recruiting children with cancer for research: Swedish healthcare professionals’ perceptions and experiences.Kajsa Norbäck, Anna T. Höglund, Tove Godskesen & Sara Frygner-Holm - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-13.
    Background Research is crucial to improve treatment, survival and quality of life for children with cancer. However, recruitment of children for research raises ethical challenges. The aim of this study was to explore and describe ethical values and challenges related to the recruitment of children with cancer for research, from the perspectives and experiences of healthcare professionals in the Swedish context. Another aim was to explore their perceptions of research ethics competence in recruiting children for research. Methods An explorative (...)
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  27.  12
    Who Killed Georgette Smith? Healthcare Providers at the Intersection of Criminal Law and Patient Care.Lawrence W. Vernaglia - 1999 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 1 (4):12-308.
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  28.  19
    Competencies and Milestones for Bioethics Trainees: Beyond ASBH’s Healthcare Ethics Consultant Certification and Core Competencies.Douglas S. Diekema, Anna Snyder, Nicolas Dundas & Kimberly E. Sawyer - 2021 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 32 (2):127-148.
    Clinical ethics training programs are responsible for preparing their trainees to be competent ethics consultants worthy of the trust of patients, families, surrogates, and healthcare professionals. While the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) offers a certification examination for healthcare ethics consultants, no tools exist for the formal evaluation of ethics trainees to assess their progress toward competency. Medical specialties accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) use milestones to report trainees’ progress along a (...)
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  29.  33
    Ethical Problems in Rural Healthcare: Local Symptoms, Systemic Disease.Christopher P. Morley & Peter G. Beatty - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):59-60.
  30.  33
    Medical ethics on film: towards a reconstruction of the teaching of healthcare professionals.A. Volandes - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (11):678-680.
    The clinical vignette remains the standard means by which medical ethics are taught to students in the healthcare professions. Although written or verbal vignettes are useful as a pedagogic tool for teaching ethics and introducing students to real cases, they are limited, since students must imagine the clinical scenario. Medical ethics are almost universally taught during the early years of training, when students are unfamiliar with the clinical reality in which ethics issues arise. Film vignettes fill in that imaginative (...)
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  31.  20
    Home‐care nurses’ distinctive work: A discourse analysis of what takes precedence in changing healthcare services.Ann-Kristin Fjørtoft, Trine Oksholm, Charlotte Delmar, Oddvar Førland & Herdis Alvsvåg - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (1):e12375.
    Ongoing changes in many Western countries have resulted in more healthcare services being transferred to municipalities and taking place in patients’ homes. This greatly impacts nurses’ work in home care, making their work increasingly diverse and demanding. In this study, we explore home‐care nursing through a critical discourse analysis of focus group interviews with home‐care nurses. Drawing on insights from positioning theory, we discuss the content and delineation of their work and the interweaving of contextual changes. Nurses hold a (...)
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  32.  15
    Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Among Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Outbreak and Relationships With Expressive Flexibility and Context Sensitivity.Vittorio Lenzo, Maria C. Quattropani, Alberto Sardella, Gabriella Martino & George A. Bonanno - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This study aimed at investigating depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms among healthcare workers and examine the role of expressive flexibility and context sensitivity as key components of resilience in understanding reported symptoms. We hypothesized a significant and different contribution of resilience components in explaining depression, anxiety, and stress. A total sample of 218 Italian healthcare workers participated in this study through an online survey during the lockdown, consequently to the COVID-19. The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 was used to (...)
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  33.  9
    An Argument for Standardized Ethical Directives for Secular Healthcare Services.Jamie C. Watson & Abram L. Brummett - 2022 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 33 (3):175-188.
    We argue that the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities has endorsed a facilitation approach to clinical ethics consultation that asserts that bioethicists can offer moral recommendations that are well-grounded in bioethical consensus. We claim that the closest thing the field currently has to a citable, nationally endorsed bioethical consensus are the 22 Core References used to construct the questions for the Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified (HEC-C) exam. We acknowledge that the Core References reflect some important points of bioethical consensus, (...)
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  34.  25
    Knowledge, attitudes, ethical and social perspectives towards fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) among Jordanian healthcare providers.Amal G. Al-Bakri, Amal A. Akour & Wael K. Al-Delaimy - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-10.
    Background Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is a treatment modality that involves the introduction of stool from a healthy pre-screened donor into the gastrointestinal tract of a patient. It exerts its therapeutic effects by remodeling the gut microbiota and treating microbial dysbiosis-imbalance. FMT is not regulated in Jordan, and regulatory effort for FMT therapy in Jordan, an Islamic conservative country, might be faced with unique cultural, social, religious, and ethical challenges. We aimed to assess knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of ethical and (...)
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  35.  22
    Oughtonomy in healthcare. A deconstructive reading of Kantian autonomy.Ignaas Devisch - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):303-312.
    For years now, autonomy has been discussed as one of the central values in health care. Understood as self-realization, it is opposed to paternalism which is conceived as an intolerable occurrence of heteronomy. Although different concepts have been developed to nuance this opposition, when it comes to health care discourse, heteronomy is still the enemy of autonomy. In our article, we defend the thesis that autonomy is only achievable as heteronomy. We are not arguing for an expansion of the meaning (...)
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  36.  19
    Multi Scale Ethics—Why We Need to Consider the Ethics of AI in Healthcare at Different Scales.Melanie Smallman - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-17.
    Many researchers have documented how AI and data driven technologies have the potential to have profound effects on our lives—in ways that make these technologies stand out from those that went before. Around the world, we are seeing a significant growth in interest and investment in AI in healthcare. This has been coupled with rising concerns about the ethical implications of these technologies and an array of ethical guidelines for the use of AI and data in healthcare has (...)
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  37.  24
    Defining What is Good: Pluralism and Healthcare Quality.Polly Mitchell, Alan Cribb & Vikki A. Entwistle - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (4):367-388.
    'Quality' is a widely invoked concept in healthcare, and 'quality improvement' is now a central part of healthcare service delivery. However, these concepts and their associated practices represent relatively uncharted territory for applied philosophy and bioethics. In this paper, we explore some of the conceptual complexity of quality in healthcare and argue that quality is best understood to be conceptually plural. Quality is widely agreed to be multidimensional and as such constitutively plural. However, we argue that quality (...)
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  38.  38
    Ethical concerns in maternal and child healthcare in Malawi.Gladys Msiska, Tiwonge Munkhondya, Berlington Munkhondya, Lucy Ngoma, Hlalapi Kunkeyani, Andrew Simwaka, Pam Smith, Lucy Kululanga, Rodwell Gundo, Ezereth Kabuluzi, Patrick Mapulanga & Chisomo Mulenga - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (3):256-264.
    Background Caring is a core function of nurses and it confers upon them ethical obligations as ethical agents. Failure to carry out such ethical obligations raises ethical concerns. This study was not intended to explore ethical concerns, but the reported findings reveal problems which have ethical implications. This paper aims to elucidate the ethical issues inherent in the findings and propose strategies to mitigate them. Research design and methods An exploratory-descriptive qualitative design was used within a larger Action Research Study. (...)
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  39. How the past matters for the future: a luck egalitarian sustainability principle for healthcare resource allocation.Andreas Albertsen - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):102-103.
    Christian Munthe, David Fumagalli and Erik Malmqvist argue that well-known healthcare resource allocation principles, such as need, prognosis, equal treatment and cost-effectiveness, should be supplemented with a principle of sustainability.1 Employing such a principle would entail that the allocation of healthcare resources should take into account whether a specific allocation causes negative dynamics, which would limit the amount of resources available in the future. As examples of allocation decisions, which may have such negative dynamics, they mention those who (...)
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  40.  72
    Vulnerability, Harm, and Compromised Ethics Revealed by the Experiences of Queer Birthing Women in Rural Healthcare.Sylvia Burrow, Lisa Goldberg, Jennifer Searle & Megan Aston - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (4):511-524.
    Phenomenological interviews with queer women in rural Nova Scotia reveal significant forms of trauma experienced during labour and birth. Situating the accounts of participants within both phenomenological and intersectional analyses reveals harms enabled by structurally embedded heteronormative and homophobic healthcare practices and policies. Our account illustrates the breadth and depth of harm experienced and outlines how these violate core ethical principles and values in healthcare.
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  41.  29
    Toward a decolonized healthcare ethics: Colonial legacies and the Siamese crocodile.Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues - 2020 - Developing World Bioethics 20 (3):118-119.
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  42.  55
    Choice is not the issue. The misrepresentation of healthcare in bioethical discourse.Kari Milch Agledahl, Reidun Førde & Åge Wifstad - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):212-215.
    Next SectionThe principle of respect for autonomy has shaped much of the bioethics' discourse over the last 50 years, and is now most commonly used in the meaning of respecting autonomous choice. This is probably related to the influential concept of informed consent, which originated in research ethics and was soon also applied to the field of clinical medicine. But while available choices in medical research are well defined, this is rarely the case in healthcare. Consideration of ordinary medical (...)
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  43.  27
    Improvement Science Meets Improvement Scholarship: Reframing Research for Better Healthcare.Alan Cribb - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):109-123.
    In this editorial essay I explore the possibilities of ‘improvement scholarship’ in order to set the scene for the theme of, and the other papers in, this issue. I contrast a narrow conception of quality improvement research with a much broader and more inclusive conception, arguing that we should greatly extend the existing dialogue between ‘problem-solving’ and ‘critical’ currents in improvement research. I have in mind the potential for building a much larger conversation between those people in ‘improvement science’ who (...)
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  44.  10
    From ‘if‐then’ to ‘what if?’ Rethinking healthcare algorithmics with posthuman speculative ethics.Jamie Smith, Goda Klumbyte & Ren Loren Britton - 2023 - Nursing Philosophy 24 (3):e12447.
    This article discusses the role that algorithmic thinking and management play in health care and the kind of exclusions this might create. We argue that evidence‐based medicine relies on research and data to create pathways for patient journeys. Coupled with data‐based algorithmic prediction tools in health care, they establish what could be called health care algorithmics—a mode of management of healthcare that produces forms of algorithmic governmentality. Relying on a critical posthumanist perspective, we show how healthcare algorithmics is (...)
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  45.  72
    Patient autonomy and choice in healthcare: self-testing devices as a case in point.Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O’Mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that self-testing provides (...)
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  46.  9
    Pastoral care as a resource for development in the global healthcare context: Implications for Africa’s healthcare delivery system.Emem Agbiji & Obaji Agbiji - 2016 - HTS Theological Studies 72 (4).
    Development is concerned with the transformation of people to foster their health, wholeness and growth. The link between health and development points to religion as potential social capital for development. There is an ongoing debate about the role of pastoral care as a religious resource in global healthcare contexts. This is unfortunately not the case in Africa, as pastoral care has not received sufficient attention for its role in healthcare and development in development discourses. The limited research on (...)
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  47.  25
    Well‐being and dignity in innovative digitally‐led healthcare for aged adults.Moonika Raja & Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (2):e12479.
    Dignity is a central value in care for aged adults, and it must be protected and respected. With demographic changes leading to an aging population, health ministries are increasingly investing in digitalization. However, using unfamiliar digital technology can be challenging and thus impact aged adults' dignity and well‐being. The INNOVATEDIGNITY project aims to research new, dignified ways of engaging with aged adults to shape digital developments in care delivery. This qualitative study aimed to explore how innovative digitally‐led healthcare have (...)
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  48. Feiring’s concept of forward–looking responsibility: a dead end for responsibility in healthcare.Andreas Albertsen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):161-164.
    Eli Feiring has developed a concept of forward-looking responsibility in healthcare. On this account, what matters morally in the allocation of scarce healthcare resources is not people's past behaviours but rather their commitment to take on lifestyles that will increase the benefit acquired from received treatment. According to Feiring, this is to be preferred over the backward-looking concept of responsibility often associated with luck egalitarianism. The article critically scrutinises Feiring's position. It begins by spelling out the wider implications (...)
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    Co-payment for Unfunded Additional Care in Publicly Funded Healthcare Systems: Ethical Issues.Joakim Färdow, Linus Broström & Mats Johansson - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):515-524.
    The burdens of resource constraints in publicly funded healthcare systems urge decision makers in countries like Sweden, Norway and the UK to find new financial solutions. One proposal that has been put forward is co-payment—a financial model where some treatment or care is made available to patients who are willing and able to pay the costs that exceed the available alternatives fully covered by public means. Co-payment of this sort has been associated with various ethical concerns. These range from (...)
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    A clear case for conscience in healthcare practice.Giles Birchley - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):13-17.
    The value of conscience in healthcare ethics is widely debated. While some sources present it as an unquestionably positive attribute, others question both the veracity of its decisions and the effect of conscientious objection on patient access to health care. This paper argues that the right to object conscientiously should be broadened, subject to certain previsos, as there are many benefits to healthcare practice in the development of the consciences of practitioners. While effects such as the preservation of (...)
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