Results for 'freedom of speech'

980 found
Order:
See also
  1. Freedom of speech.Anthony Skillen - 1982 - In Keith Graham (ed.), Contemporary political philosophy: radical studies. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  58
    Freedom of speech: A relational defence.Matteo Bonotti & Jonathan Seglow - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):515-529.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 515-529, May 2022. Much of the recent literature on freedom of speech has focused on the arguments for and against the regulation of certain kinds of speech. Discussions of hate speech and offensive speech, for example, abound in this literature, as do debates concerning the permissibility of pornography. Less attention has been paid, however, at least recently, to the normative foundations of freedom of speech (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  85
    Freedom of speech and religion.Andrew Altman - 2003 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The Oxford handbook of practical ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 358.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Does Freedom of Speech Include Hate Speech?Caleb Yong - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (4):385-403.
    I take it that liberal justice recognises special protections against the restriction of speech and expression; this is what I call the Free Speech Principle. I ask if this Principle includes speech acts which might broadly be termed ‘hate speech’, where ‘includes’ is sensitive to the distinction between coverage and protection , and between speech that is regulable and speech that should be regulated . I suggest that ‘hate speech’ is too broad a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  5.  42
    Freedom of Speech and Its Limits.Wojciech Sadurski - 1999 - Springer Verlag.
    In authoritarian states, the discourse on freedom of speech, conducted by those opposed to non-democratic governments, focuses on the core aspects of this freedom: on a right to criticize the government, a right to advocate theories arid ideologies contrary to government-imposed orthodoxy, a right to demand institutional reforms, changes in politics, resignation of the incompetent and the corrupt from positions of authority. The claims for freedom of speech focus on those exercises of freedom that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6.  4
    The Freedom of Speech and Its Scope in The Political Texts (Siyasatnāma).Hüsnü Aydeni̇z - 2021 - Cumhuriyet İlahiyat Dergisi 25 (2):735-755.
    The main purpose of this study was to determine the accumulation of the tradition of political texts (Siyasatnāma) in the context of freedom of expression and to discuss the potential of creating new perspectives accordingly. One of the most important criticisms of modernity towards traditional structures is the claim that people are subjected to many limitations on social, cultural and religious grounds. This criticism, which mainly focuses on limiting the freedom of action, also comes across as preventing the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  55
    Freedom of speech, freedom to teach, freedom to learn: The crisis of higher education in the post-truth era.Anatoly V. Oleksiyenko & Liz Jackson - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (11):1057-1062.
    With increasing influence of illiberalism, freedom should not be considered or interpreted lightly. Post-truth contexts provide grounds for alt-right movements to capture and pervert notions of freedom of speech, making universities battlefields of politicised emotions and expressions. In societies facing these pressures around the world, academic freedom has never been challenged as much as it is today. As Peters and colleagues note, conceptualisations of ‘facts’ and ‘evidences’ are politically, socially, and epistemically reconstructed in post-truth contexts. At (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  46
    Freedom of speech: A relational defence.Matteo Bonotti & Jonathan Seglow - 2022 - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):515-529.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 515-529, May 2022. Much of the recent literature on freedom of speech has focused on the arguments for and against the regulation of certain kinds of speech. Discussions of hate speech and offensive speech, for example, abound in this literature, as do debates concerning the permissibility of pornography. Less attention has been paid, however, at least recently, to the normative foundations of freedom of speech (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  54
    Freedom of Speech as an Expressive Mode of Existence.Alexander Carnera - 2012 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (1):57-69.
    This paper adopts Deleuze’s reading of Spinoza’s expressionism and pure semiotics to argue that Spinoza’s Ethics offers an alternative notion of freedom of speech that is based on the potentia of the individual. Its aim is to show how freedom of thought is connected to the problem of individuation that connects our mode of being with our power to speak and think. Rather than treating freedom of speech as an enlightened idea that is in opposition (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Freedom of Speech Acts? A Response to Langton.Daniel Jacobson - 1995 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (1):64-78.
  11.  20
    Freedom of Speech and Expression: Its History, its Value, its Good Use, and its Misuse.Richard Sorabji - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    "This book on freedom of speech and expression starts with an inter-cultural history of this valued right through the ages and then recalls the benefits for which we rightly value it. But what about speech that frustrates these benefits? Supporters of the benefits of free speech have reason to exercise voluntary self-restraint on speech which frustrates the benefits. They should also cultivate a second remedy: the art, illustrated in chapter 1, and called by Gandhi the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  48
    Freedom of Speech in Modern Political Culture.Justyna Miklaszewska - 2019 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 10 (1):77-88.
    In the philosophy of liberalism, freedom of speech is one of the fundamental rights of the individual, one that is guaranteed by the constitution of a liberal democratic state. Contemporary Western democracies are based on the political culture in which human rights, including the right to free speech, play an important role. This right, however, can be violated by demagogic propaganda both in totalitarian regimes and in democracies. The propaganda mechanism, reaching into the sphere of community values (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  6
    Educational Freedom of Speech: From Principle to Practice.Kobi Yaaqov Assoulin - 2019 - Philosophy of Education 75:153-167.
  14.  32
    Freedom of Speech and the Video Game Censorship Debate.Robert Best - 2011 - Polis (Misc) 5:1.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  24
    Expression, Freedom of Speech and the State.Christopher Bennett - 2017 - Jurisprudence 8 (2):360-369.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Self-Expression, and Kant’s Public Use of Reason.Geert Van Eekert - 2017 - Diametros 54:118-137.
    This article turns to early modern and Enlightenment advocates of tolerance in order to discover and lay bare the line of argument that informed their commitment to free speech. This line of argument will subsequently be used to assess the shift from free speech to the contemporary ideal of free self-expression. In order to take this assessment one step further, this article will finally turn to Immanuel Kant’s famous defense of the public use of reason. In the wake (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  95
    Freedom of speech and philosophy of education.Roy Harris - 2009 - British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (2):111-126.
    Why is freedom of speech so seldom raised as an issue in philosophy of education? In assessing this question, it is important to distinguish (i) between a freedom and its exercise, and (ii) between different philosophies of education. Western philosophies of education may be broadly divided into classes derived from theories of knowledge first articulated in ancient Greece. Freedom of speech is in principle inimical to some of these, while being essential to the objectives of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  29
    Freedom of Speech and Its Limits During Two Decades of Independence.Algimantas Šindeikis - 2013 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 20 (3):1023-1060.
    Freedom of speech has been essential in building democracy in Lithuania after regaining its independence. Exercise of the constitutional freedom of expression within the societies following constitutional values is the major factor shaping the political will of citizens. Wide-ranging, all round public discussion about all public interest issues is possible only when it is subject to due freedom of information. In indirect democracy, strong disseminator of information acting between citizens and the Parliament able to create the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  23
    Weaponising Freedom of Speech: Gavan Titley: Is Free Speech Racist? Cambridge: Polity Press, 2020, 155 pp.Bob Brecher - 2020 - Res Publica 27 (1):151-154.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Freedom of Speech in Ancient Athens.Max Radin - 1927 - American Journal of Philology 48 (3):215.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Freedom of speech.David van Mill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22.  24
    Freedom of Speech and Moral Development in John Milton´s Political Thought and Johann Gottlieb Fichte´s Revolutionary Writings.Héctor Oscar Arrese Igor - 2019 - Las Torres de Lucca. International Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (14):9-33.
    This paper aims to explore conceptual relationships between philosophical developments to support freedom of speech in John Milton´s Areopagitica and Johann Gottlieb Fichte´s Reclamation of the Freedom of Thought. I intend to enhance the philosophical heritance collected and recreated by Fichte. This paper hypothesizes that both theories state that freedom of speech is a condition for the development of morality. In both cases, moral deliberation has a public character, given that moral judgment needs the consideration (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  13
    Freedom of Speech: Volume 21, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Whether free speech is defended as a fundamental right that inheres in each individual, or as a guarantee that all of society's members will have a voice in democratic decision-making, the central role of expressive freedom in liberating the human spirit is undeniable. Freedom of expression will, as the essays in this volume illuminate, encounter new and continuing controversies in the twenty-first century. Advances in digital technology raise pressing questions regarding freedom of speech and, with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  44
    Freedom of Speech and the Public Platform.Jenny Teichman - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (1):99-105.
    ABSTRACT The paper has to do with Peter Singer's statement ‘A German Attack on Applied Ethics’, and particularly with the claim that those who protested against his speaking at conferences in Europe in 1989 failed to recognise his right to freedom of expression. I argue that the right to free expression does not mean that we may say anything at all, to anyone at all, anywhere at all. Visitors to foreign countries, for example, have some obligation to be sensitive (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Freedom of speech, multiculturalism and Islam: Yes we 'can' talk about this.Meg Wallace - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 109 (109):16.
    Wallace, Meg London's National Theatre recently hosted a debate about freedom of speech, multiculturalism and Islam called Can we talk about this? The opening line was a question to the audience, 'Are you morally superior to the Taliban?' Anne Marie Waters, who was present, wrote in her blog that 'very few people in the audience raised their hand to say they were.' This response demonstrates a misconceived attempt to be seen as tolerant and 'multiculturalist'. People could not bring (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  36
    Freedom of speech in liberal and non-liberal traditions.Volker Kaul - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):460-472.
    The article presents different theories and comparative analyses of freedom of speech in both liberal and non-liberal traditions. Whereas freedom of speech is not an absolute right, the question is if this right should depend wholly on the truth of the respective opinion or statement. Theories that justify free speech on the grounds of autonomy, tend to make truth a moral requirement of speech. Theories based on civility and public reason do restrict freedom (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  26
    Freedom of Speech: Its Exercise and Its Interpretation.David A. Turner - 2010 - British Journal of Educational Studies 58 (3):285-291.
    Professor Roy Harris criticises me for ignoring freedom of speech in order to focus on 'soft' issues, such as game theory, decision theory and chaos theory. In this response, I accept most of his arguments relating to freedom of speech, but argue that, in order to develop better systems of education, we need to pay more attention to the circumstances in which that freedom can be exercised than Harris admits.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  24
    Freedom of speech in liberal and non-liberal traditions.Volker Kaul - 2022 - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):460-472.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 460-472, May 2022. The article presents different theories and comparative analyses of freedom of speech in both liberal and non-liberal traditions. Whereas freedom of speech is not an absolute right, the question is if this right should depend wholly on the truth of the respective opinion or statement. Theories that justify free speech on the grounds of autonomy, tend to make truth a moral requirement of (...). Theories based on civility and public reason do restrict freedom of speech even further, often making a form of recognition a precondition of free speech. This reveals to be particularly relevant in multicultural contexts and discussions about blasphemy. From this overview of contemporary, global comparative debates on free speech, the article draws some conclusions. First, there should be the absolute primacy of free speech regarding governments and the powerful: Speak truth to power. Second, free speech should underlie no constraints where important individual rights are at stake. Third, academic freedom has a special status and should not be subject to the same limits as freedom of expression more generally. Forth, in civil society and the public sphere a more moderate approach to free speech should be adopted based on civility, public reason and recognition. Yet, any limits should be of moral and not legal nature. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  69
    Slurs and Freedom of Speech.Stefan Rinner - 2022 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 40 (5):836-848.
    A very common argument against restrictions on hate speech says that since such restrictions curtail freedom of speech, they cause more harm than they prevent. A no less common reply has it that the harms caused by hate speech are sufficiently great to justify legal restrictions on free speech. In ‘Freedom of Expression and Derogatory Words’, West questions a common assumption of both arguments concerning the use of slurs, i.e. that restricting the use of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Freedom of speech : why freedom of speech includes hate speech.Daniel Jacobson - 2007 - In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Silencing and Freedom of Speech in UK Higher Education.Finlay Malcolm - 2021 - British Educational Research Journal 47 (3):520-538.
    Freedom of speech in universities is currently an issue of widespread concern and debate. Recent empirical findings in the UK shed some light on whether speech is unduly restricted in the university, but it suffers from two limitations. First, the results appear contradictory. Some studies show that the issue of free speech is overblown by media reportage, whilst others track serious concerns about free speech arising from certain university policies. Second, the findings exclude important issues (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  10
    Freedom of Speech Abridged?: Cultural, Legal and Philosophical Challenges.Anine Kierulf & Helge Rønning (eds.) - 2009 - Nordicom.
  33.  31
    Freedom of speech in contemporary Arab societies from a gender perspective.Amel Grami - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):580-589.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 580-589, May 2022. Women and girls in contemporary Arab societies suffer from various and intersecting forms of discrimination that deny them their enjoyment of fundamental human rights. The right to freedom of expression is one of the essential areas that may expose this gender-based discrimination and patriarchal attitudes. In many contexts, freedom of expression has enabled women to speak out and organize in civil, political, social, economic and cultural spheres (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  16
    Freedom of speech in contemporary Arab societies from a gender perspective.Amel Grami - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):580-589.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 580-589, May 2022. Women and girls in contemporary Arab societies suffer from various and intersecting forms of discrimination that deny them their enjoyment of fundamental human rights. The right to freedom of expression is one of the essential areas that may expose this gender-based discrimination and patriarchal attitudes. In many contexts, freedom of expression has enabled women to speak out and organize in civil, political, social, economic and cultural spheres (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  9
    Freedom of speech in contemporary Arab societies from a gender perspective.Amel Grami - 2022 - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):580-589.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 580-589, May 2022. Women and girls in contemporary Arab societies suffer from various and intersecting forms of discrimination that deny them their enjoyment of fundamental human rights. The right to freedom of expression is one of the essential areas that may expose this gender-based discrimination and patriarchal attitudes. In many contexts, freedom of expression has enabled women to speak out and organize in civil, political, social, economic and cultural spheres (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  4
    Dialectics: Freedom of Speech and Thought.James Seaton - 1980 - Journal of the History of Ideas 41 (2):283.
  37.  74
    Justifications of freedom of speech: Towards a double-grounded non-consequentialist approach.Devrim Kabasakal Badamchi - 2015 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (9):907-927.
    This article aims to develop a ground for freedom of speech that combines two justifications – democratic participation and autonomy. First, it is argued that consequentialist justifications, such as discovery of truth and personal development, are far from providing a strong justification for free speech due to their reliance on uncertain empirical validation. Second, it is claimed that a stronger and better ground for free speech can be constructed by articulating two non-consequentialist justifications for free (...) – democratic participation and autonomy. This articulation, which I call the double-grounded non-consequentialist justification for free speech, considers autonomy and democratic participation as complementary principles. In this sense, a double-grounded justification engages justification as autonomy and democratic participation in a dialogue in order to provide remedies for the specific weaknesses of these two positions. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  17
    Freedom of Speech Is the Foremost Human Right (1998).Hu Ping - 2001 - In Stephen C. Angle & Marina Svensson (eds.), Chinese Human Rights Reader. M. E. Sharpe. pp. 423.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  28
    Freedom of Speech in Hong Kong & the Problem of "China".Peter J. Hutchings - 1996 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 8 (2):267-275.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Freedom of Speech, Sexual Harassment, and Internet Filters in Academic Libraries.Avi Janssen - 2000 - Journal of Information Ethics 9 (2):37-45.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Freedom of Speech.D. V. Mill - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Freedom of Speech, American Public Education, and Standardized Tests: A Critical Enquiry.C. J. Fazzaro - 2006 - Journal of Thought 41 (4):11.
  43. Freedom of Speech is Always under Attack in Privileged White Man Land.Howard Littler - 2017 - In Alejandro Abraham-Hamanoiel (ed.), Liberalism in neoliberal times: dimensions, contradictions, limits. London: Goldsmiths Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW]Boudewijn de Bruin - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Freedom of Speech.Nicholas Shackel - 2015 - In Henk ten Have (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Bioethics. Dordrecht: Springer.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  6
    Freedom of Speech-Acts.Roger A. Shiner - 1970 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 3 (1):40 - 50.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  4
    “Educational Freedom of Speech: From Principle to Practice”: a response to Assoulin.Danny Gibboney - 2019 - Philosophy of Education 75:168-172.
  48.  45
    Freedom of Speech And Access To Mass Media.Joseph Grcic - 1988 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):51-58.
  49.  16
    Freedom of Speech And Access To Mass Media.Joseph Grcic - 1988 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):51-58.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  52
    Freedom of speech: Liberals yersus radicals.William Bruening - 1976 - Journal of Social Philosophy 7 (3):1-4.
1 — 50 / 980