Results for 'for the European End-of-Life'

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  1.  57
    Forgoing Treatment at the End of Life in 6 European Countries.Georg Bosshard, Tore Nilstun, Johan Bilsen, Michael Norup, Guido Miccinesi, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Karin Faisst, Agnes van der Heide & for the European End-of-Life - 2005 - JAMA Internal Medicine 165 (4):401-407.
    Modern medicine provides unprecedented opportunities in diagnostics and treatment. However, in some situations at the end of a patient’s life, many physicians refrain from using all possible measures to prolong life. We studied the incidence of different types of treatment withheld or withdrawn in 6 European countries and analyzed the main background characteristics.
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  2.  11
    Supporting ethical end-of-life care during pandemic: Palliative care team perspectives.Enrico De Luca, Barbara Sena & Silvia Cataldi - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (4):570-584.
    Background Italy was the first European country to be involved with the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, many healthcare professionals were deployed and suddenly faced end-of-life care management and its challenges. Aims To understand the experiences of palliative care professionals deployed in supporting emergency and critical care staff during the COVID-19 first and second pandemic waves. Research design A qualitative descriptive design was adopted, and in-depth interviews were used to investigate and analyse participants’ perceptions and points of view. (...)
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  3.  37
    Mental competence and surrogate decision-making towards the end of life.M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the (...)
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  4.  18
    Dignity at the end of life: from philosophy to health care practice - Lithuanian case.Olga Riklikienė & Žydrūnė Luneckaitė - 2022 - Monash Bioethics Review 40 (Suppl 1):28-48.
    Regulation and clinical practices regarding end of human life care differ among the nations and countries. These differences reflect the history of the development of state health systems, different societal values, and different understandings of dignity and what it means to protect or respect dignity. The result is variation in the ethical, legal, and practical approaches to end-of-life issues. The article analyzes the diversity of strategies to strengthen dignity at the end of life of terminally ill patients (...)
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  5.  35
    The impact of regional culture on intensive care end of life decision making: an Israeli perspective from the ETHICUS study.F. D. Ganz - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):196-199.
    Background: Decisions of patients, families, and health care providers about medical care at the end of life depend on many factors, including the societal culture. A pan-European study was conducted to determine the frequency and types of end of life practices in European intensive care units , including those in Israel. Several results of the Israeli subsample were different to those of the overall sample.Objective: The objective of this article was to explore these differences and provide (...)
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  6.  26
    Are advance directives helpful for good end of life decision making: a cross sectional survey of health professionals.Eimantas Peicius, Aurelija Blazeviciene & Raimondas Kaminskas - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):40.
    This paper joins the debate over changes in the role of health professionals when applying advance directives to manage the decision-making process at the end of life care. Issues in relation to advance directives occur in clinical units in Lithuania; however, it remains one of the few countries in the European Union where the discussion on advance directives is not included in the health-care policy-making agenda. To encourage the discussion of advance directives, a study was designed to examine (...)
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  7.  38
    Determinants of acceptance of end-of-life interventions: a comparison between withdrawing life-prolonging treatment and euthanasia in Austria.Erwin Stolz, Franziska Großschädl, Hannes Mayerl, Éva Rásky & Wolfgang Freidl - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundEnd-of-life decisions remain a hotly debated issue in many European countries and the acceptance in the general population can act as an important anchor point in these discussions. Previous studies on determinants of the acceptance of end-of-life interventions in the general population have not systematically assessed whether determinants differ between withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment and euthanasia.MethodsA large, representative survey of the Austrian adult population conducted in 2014 included items on WLPT and EUT. We constructed the following (...)
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  8.  10
    A Failing Grade for the German End-of-Life Vehicles Take-Back System.Willem H. Vanderburg & Nina Nakajima - 2005 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 25 (2):170-186.
    The German end-of-life vehicle take-back system is described and analyzed in terms of its impact on the environment and the car companies involved. It is concluded that although this system is often cited as an example of a successful take-back scheme, it is not one that maximizes the value recovered from end-of-life vehicles. As a result, corporations do not achieve the potential benefits that can be realized from an alternate value chain based on recovering value from end-of-life (...)
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  9.  76
    Three myths in end-of-life care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):389-390.
    Huang and colleagues provide some intriguing insights into the attitudes about end of life care of practising Taiwanese neonatal doctors and nurses.1 There are some similarities with surveys from other parts of the world. Most Taiwanese neonatologists and nurses agreed that it was potentially appropriate to withhold or limit treatment for infants who were dying. A very high proportion was opposed to active euthanasia of such infants. But there were also some striking differences. Only 21% of Taiwanese doctors ‘agreed’ (...)
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  10.  30
    Fourth Conference of the European Network of Buddhist-Christian Studies. (News and Views).John D'Arcy May - 2002 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 22 (1):195.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Buddhist-Christian Studies 22 (2002) 195-197 [Access article in PDF] Fourth Conference of the European Network of Buddhist-Christian Studies John D'Arcy May Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin Hosted by the Department of Theology at the University of Lund, May 4-7, 2001, this conference reversed the perspective of the previous one, which studied Buddhist perceptions of Jesus. In the event, a strong Buddhist presence from Europe, Thailand, and (...)
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  11.  17
    Formation of the political tradition in Slovakia at the end of the 20th century.O. I. Marmazova & T. R. Marmazova - 2016 - Liberal Arts in Russia 5 (1):66.
    The process of Slovak political tradition formation during the establishment of an independent state is discussed in the article. Special attention is paid to the authoritarian tendencies, which developed after the breakup of Czechoslovakia, atypical for Central and Eastern Europe character of political transformation and the establishment of the entire state power system are analyzed. A brief historical background of the evolution of ‘the Slovak question‘ and its influence on the development of the state is given. Authors highlight features of (...)
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  12.  35
    Legal Aspects of Regulation of Abortion in the Context of Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights.Edita Gruodytė - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (2):739-752.
    Regulatory approach to the right to abortion in Europe is diverse and basically related to the issue of when the right to life begins and how this question is reflected in national legislation. Such an approach and diversity is tolerated by the European Court of Human Rights, but only if some specific standards and criteria formulated in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights are reflected in national legislation. Research of the Lithuanian legal acts conducted (...)
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  13.  5
    ECHIC—The European Consortium for Humanities Institutes and Centres 2023 Annual Conference.Ilenia Vittoria Casmiri - 2024 - Utopian Studies 34 (3):625-634.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:ECHIC—The European Consortium for Humanities Institutes and Centres 2023 Annual ConferenceIlenia Vittoria CasmiriEcological Mindedness and Sustainable Wellbeing, ECHIC—The European Consortium for Humanities Institutes and Centres 2023 Annual Conference, May 25–27, 2023, University of Ferrara, ItalyThis year’s annual conference of the European Consortium for Humanities Institutes and Centres (ECHIC) invited international scholars with diverse backgrounds to explore visions of a desirable future world that is both environmentally (...)
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  14.  80
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 (...)
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  15.  28
    Caring for a Dignified End of Life in a Christian Health Care Institution: The View of Caritas Catholica Vlaanderen.Chris Gastmans - 2002 - Ethical Perspectives 9 (2-3):134-145.
    Immediately following the approval of the Belgian law on euthanasia, Caritas Catholica Vlaanderen sent a position paper to all affiliated institutions in which its standpoint regarding care for a dignified end of life is clarified. We would like to sketch very briefly the context in which this position paper should be placed, before reproducing the complete text of the recommendation.Caritas Catholica Vlaanderen is an umbrella organization for cooperation and consultation between the Verbond der Verzorgingsinstellingen [Association of Care Institutions], grouping (...)
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  16.  23
    The impact of an end-of-life healthcare ethics educational intervention.Claire Molloy, Joan McCarthy & Mark Tyrrell - 2016 - Clinical Ethics 11 (1):28-37.
    BackgroundThe impact of healthcare ethics educational interventions on participants’ ethical development is rarely reported on and assessed; even less attention is paid to educational interventions that focus on end-of-life ethical issues.AimTo evaluate the impact of the Ethical Framework for End-of-Life Care Study Sessions Programme ( EOLCSS) on the moral development of healthcare staff who are delivering end-of-life care.MethodsThe EOLCSS was delivered to 20 multi-disciplinary health care staff in Ireland in May 2013. Effect on moral reasoning was measured (...)
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  17.  59
    End-of-life decisions in medical care: principles and policies for regulating the dying process.Stephen W. Smith - 2012 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Those involved in end-of-life decision making must take into account both legal and ethical issues. This book starts with a critical reflection of ethical principles including ideas such as moral status, the value of life, acts and omissions, harm, autonomy, dignity and paternalism. It then explores the practical difficulties of regulating end-of-life decisions, focusing on patients, healthcare professionals, the wider community and issues surrounding 'slippery slope' arguments. By evaluating the available empirical evidence, the author identifies preferred ways (...)
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  18.  33
    End-of-life decisions for children under 1 year of age in the Netherlands: decreased frequency of administration of drugs to deliberately hasten death.Katja ten Cate, Suzanne van de Vathorst, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & Agnes van der Heide - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (10):795-798.
    Objective To assess whether the frequency of end-of-life decisions for children under 1 year of age in the Netherlands has changed since ultrasound examination around 20 weeks of gestation became routine in 2007 and after a legal provision for deliberately ending the life of a newborn was set up that same year. Methodology This was a recurrent nationwide cross-sectional study in the Netherlands. In 2010, a sample of death certificates from children under 1 year of age was derived (...)
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  19.  79
    The morality of experience machines for palliative and end of life care.Dan Weijers - 2017 - In Mark Silcox (ed.), Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 183-201.
    Experience machines, popularized in print by Robert Nozick and on the screen by the Wachowskis’ film The Matrix, provide highly or perfectly realistic experiences that are more pleasant and less painful than those generated in real life.1 The recent surge in virtual reality and neuro-prosthetic technologies is making the creation of real-world experience machines seem inevitable and perhaps imminent.2 Given the likelihood of the near-future availability of such machines, it behooves ethicists to consider the moral status of their potential (...)
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  20.  40
    The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project: An experiential approach to philosophy and ethics in health care education.Donna Dickenson & Michael J. Parker - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):231-237.
    The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project (EBEPE), funded by the BIOMED programme of the European Commission, is a five-nation partnership to produce open learning materials for healthcare ethics education. Papers and case studies from a series of twelve conferences throughout the European Union, reflecting the ‘burning issues’ in the participants' healthcare systems, have been collected by a team based at Imperial College, London, where they are now being edited into a series of seven activity-based workbooks for (...)
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  21.  59
    Teaching and learning ethics: Rights, respect for dignity and end-of-life care: time for a change in the concept of informed consent.J. M. Freeman - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):61-62.
    The current concepts of autonomy, surrogate autonomy and informed consent often lead to futile and expensive care at the ends of life. They may impinge on the dignity of the patient as well as subject society to unwarranted expense. In order to provide affordable healthcare for all, these concepts are in need of modification.
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  22.  23
    Reasons doctors provide futile treatment at the end of life: a qualitative study.Lindy Willmott, Benjamin White, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves, Sarah Winch, Leonie Kaye Callaway, Nicole Shepherd & Eliana Close - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):496-503.
    Objective Futile treatment, which by definition cannot benefit a patient, is undesirable. This research investigated why doctors believe that treatment that they consider to be futile is sometimes provided at the end of a patient9s life. Design Semistructured in-depth interviews. Setting Three large tertiary public hospitals in Brisbane, Australia. Participants 96 doctors from emergency, intensive care, palliative care, oncology, renal medicine, internal medicine, respiratory medicine, surgery, cardiology, geriatric medicine and medical administration departments. Participants were recruited using purposive maximum variation (...)
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  23. End‐of‐life care in the 21st century: Advance directives in universal rights discourse.Violeta Beširević - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (3):105-112.
    This article explores universal normative bases that could help to shape a workable legal construct that would facilitate a global use of advance directives. Although I believe that advance directives are of universal character, my primary aim in approaching this issue is to remain realistic. I will make three claims. First, I will argue that the principles of autonomy, dignity and informed consent, embodied in the Oviedo Convention and the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, could arguably be regarded (...)
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  24.  4
    The Skill of End-of-Life Communication for Clinicians: Getting to the Root of the Ethical Dilemma.Kathleen Benton - 2017 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    With a focus on end-of-life discussion in aging and chronically ill populations, this book offers insight into the skill of communicating in complex and emotionally charged discussions. This text is written for all clinicians and professionals in the fields of healthcare and public health who are faced with questions of ethical deliberation when a patient's illness turns from chronic to terminal. This skill is required to manage care well in an age of advanced technology, and numerous autonomous choices. With (...)
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  25.  21
    The spectrum of end of life care: an argument for access to medical assistance in dying for vulnerable populations.Alysia C. Wright & Jessica C. Shaw - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (2):211-219.
    Medical assistance in dying was legalized by the Supreme Court of Canada in June 2016 and became a legal, viable end of life care option for Canadians with irremediable illness and suffering. Much attention has been paid to the balance between physicians’ willingness to provide MAiD and patients’ legal right to request medically assisted death in certain circumstances. In contrast, very little attention has been paid to the challenge of making MAiD accessible to vulnerable populations. The purpose of this (...)
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  26.  53
    End-of-life decisions of physicians in the city of hasselt (flanders, belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254–267.
    Objectives: The objective of this study is to estimate the proportion of different types of end‐of‐life decisions (ELDs) of physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium). The question is addressed to what degree these ELD meet legal constraints and the ethical requirements for prudent practice. Methodology: All physicians of the city of Hasselt who signed at least one death certificate in 1996 (N=166) received an anonymous self‐administered mail questionnaire per death case (max. 5/doctor) Results: the response rate was (...)
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  27.  11
    End-of-life care for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.Sandra L. Friedman & David T. Helm (eds.) - 2010 - Washington, DC: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.
    End-of-life care is the only major reference to systematically explore the unique medical, social, legal, political, and ethical issues to consider while providing care to adults and children with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are facing terminal illness or life-limiting conditions.
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  28. Legitimizing the shameful: End-of-life ethics and the political economy of death.Miran Epstein - 2006 - Bioethics 21 (1):23–31.
    ABSTRACT This paper explores one of the most politically sensitive and intellectually neglected issues in bioethics – the interface between the history of contemporary end‐of‐life ethics and the economics of life and death. It suggests that contrary to general belief, economic impulses have increasingly become part of the conditions in which contemporary end‐of‐life ethics continues to evolve. Although this conclusion does not refute the philosophical justifications provided by the ethics for itself, it may cast new light upon (...)
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  29.  47
    End‐of‐life Decisions of Physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254-267.
    Objectives: The objective of this study is to estimate the proportion of different types of end‐of‐life decisions (ELDs) of physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium). The question is addressed to what degree these ELD meet legal constraints and the ethical requirements for prudent practice.Methodology: All physicians of the city of Hasselt who signed at least one death certificate in 1996 (N=166) received an anonymous self‐administered mail questionnaire per death case (max. 5/doctor)Results: the response rate was 55% (N=269). (...)
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  30.  24
    Eliminating Life: From the early modern ontology of Life to Enlightenment proto-biology.Charles T. Wolfe - forthcoming - In Stephen Howard & Jack Stetter (eds.), The Edinburgh Critical History of Early Modern and Enlightenment Philosophy. Edinburgh University Press.
    Well prior to the invention of the term ‘biology’ in the early 1800s by Lamarck and Treviranus (and lesser-known figures in the decades prior), and also prior to the appearance of terms such as ‘organism’ under the pen of Leibniz and Stahl in the early 1700s, the question of ‘Life’, that is, the status of living organisms within the broader physico-mechanical universe, agitated different corners of the European intellectual scene. From modern Epicureanism to medical Newtonianism, from Stahlian animism (...)
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  31. The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.James Rachels - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    In this provocative book, a professor of philosophy examines the arguments for and against euthanasia, analyzes specific case studies, including those of Baby Jane Doe and Barney Clark, and offers an alternate theory on the morality of euthanasia. Various traditional distinctions--between "human" and "non-human," intentional and nonintentional, killing and "letting die"--are taken into account to determine whether euthanasia is permissible or not. Rachels presents a systematic argument against the traditional view, defending an alternative position based on the belief that there (...)
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  32.  70
    End‐of‐Life Decisions and the Reinvented Rule of Double Effect: A Critical Analysis.Anna Lindblad, Niels Lynöe & Niklas Juth - 2012 - Bioethics 28 (7):368-377.
    The Rule of Double Effect (RDE) holds that it may be permissible to harm an individual while acting for the sake of a proportionate good, given that the harm is not an intended means to the good but merely a foreseen side-effect. Although frequently used in medical ethical reasoning, the rule has been repeatedly questioned in the past few decades. However, Daniel Sulmasy, a proponent who has done a lot of work lately defending the RDE, has recently presented a reformulated (...)
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  33.  17
    Better Regulation of End-Of-Life Care: A Call For A Holistic Approach.Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott & Eliana Close - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (4):683-693.
    Existing regulation of end-of-life care is flawed. Problems include poorly-designed laws, policies, ethical codes, training, and funding programs, which often are neither effective nor helpful in guiding decision-making. This leads to adverse outcomes for patients, families, health professionals, and the health system as a whole. A key factor contributing to the harms of current regulation is a siloed approach to regulating end-of-life care. Existing approaches to regulation, and research into how that regulation could be improved, have tended to (...)
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  34.  39
    Ethics and end of life care: the Liverpool Care Pathway and the Neuberger Review.Anthony Wrigley - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):639-643.
    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying has recently been the topic of substantial media interest and also been subject to the independent Neuberger Review. This review has identified clear failings in some areas of care and recommended the Liverpool Care Pathway be phased out. I argue that while the evidence gathered of poor incidences of practice by the Review is of genuine concern for end of life care, the inferences drawn from this evidence are inconsistent with the causes (...)
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  35.  55
    Ethical considerations for HIV cure-related research at the end of life.Karine Dubé, Sara Gianella, Susan Concha-Garcia, Susan J. Little, Andy Kaytes, Jeff Taylor, Kushagra Mathur, Sogol Javadi, Anshula Nathan, Hursch Patel, Stuart Luter, Sean Philpott-Jones, Brandon Brown & Davey Smith - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):83.
    The U.S. National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute of Mental Health have a new research priority: inclusion of terminally ill persons living with HIV in HIV cure-related research. For example, the Last Gift is a clinical research study at the University of California San Diego for PLWHIV who have a terminal illness, with a prognosis of less than 6 months. As end-of-life HIV cure research is relatively new, the scientific community has a timely opportunity (...)
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  36.  23
    Unbefriended, Uninvited: How End-of-Life Doulas Can Address Ethical and Procedural Gaps for Unrepresented Patients and Ensure Equal Access to the “Good Death”.Adele Flaherty & Anna Meurer - 2023 - Clinical Ethics 18 (1):55-61.
    In response to a global population with increasingly complex issues at the end of life, a movement in the U.S. has emerged incorporating doulas into end-of-life care. These end-of-life (EOL) doulas are not just focused on the quality of life, but also the quality of death. Like birth doulas, who provide support for pregnant patients and their families, EOL doulas help alleviate physical and mental discomfort in those who are dying. In this paper, we explore the (...)
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  37.  5
    Finishing our story: preparing for the end of life.Gregory L. Eastwood - 2019 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Death is the destiny we all share, and this will not change. Yet the way we die, which had remained the same for many generations, has changed drastically in a relatively short time for those in developed countries with access to healthcare. For generations, if people were lucky enough to reach old age, not having died in infancy or childhood, in childbirth, in war, or by accident, they would take to bed, surrounded by loved ones who cared for them, and (...)
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  38. A Question In End-of-life Medicine In Japan: Three Levels Structure Analysis Of The Ethics Of Provision Of Permanent And Active Artificial Nutrition And Hydration For Elderly Who Cannot Eat.Atsushi Asai - 2011 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 21 (1-2):37-40.
    This article will focus on issues concerning the provision of artificial nutrition and hydration to patients who are extremely old, completely bedridden, and totally dependent on others. These patients have no advance directives, no malignancy, suffer from persistent but unstable disturbance of consciousness as well as severe cognitive impairment, and cannot eat sufficient amounts of food to maintain their lives. Should ANH be provided? Some would agree while others would maintain otherwise. The underlying values and normative theory behind each argument (...)
     
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  39.  40
    End of life decision making, policy and the criminal justice system: Untrained carers assuming responsibility (UCARes) and their uncertain legal liabilities.Robin Mackenzie & H. Biggs - 2006 - Genomics, Society and Policy 2 (1):118-128.
    This article will explore some previously unrecognised legal and ethical issues associated with informal care-giving and criminal justice in the context of end of life decision-making. It was prompted by a recent case in Leeds Crown Court, which raises important issues for the people who care for their loved ones at home and for the criminal justice system more generally. Government figures estimate that over 5.2 million Britons are responsible for the care of relatives or loved ones. In order (...)
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  40.  16
    Ethical and practical considerations for HIV cure-related research at the end-of-life: a qualitative interview and focus group study in the United States.Karine Dubé, Davey Smith, Brandon Brown, Susan Little, Steven Hendrickx, Stephen A. Rawlings, Samuel Ndukwe, Hursch Patel, Christopher Christensen, Andy Kaytes, Jeff Taylor, Susanna Concha-Garcia, Sara Gianella & John Kanazawa - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-17.
    BackgroundOne of the next frontiers in HIV research is focused on finding a cure. A new priority includes people with HIV (PWH) with non-AIDS terminal illnesses who are willing to donate their bodies at the end-of-life (EOL) to advance the search towards an HIV cure. We endeavored to understand perceptions of this research and to identify ethical and practical considerations relevant to implementing it.MethodsWe conducted 20 in-depth interviews and 3 virtual focus groups among four types of key stakeholders in (...)
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  41.  31
    Ethical Problems in End-of-Life Decisions for Elderly Norwegians.Marjorie A. Schaffer - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (2):242-257.
    Norwegian health professionals, elderly people and family members experience ethical problems involving end-of-life decision making for elders in the context of the values of Norwegian society. This study used ethical inquiry and qualitative methodology to conduct and analyze interviews carried out with 25 health professionals, six elderly people and five family members about the ethical problems they encountered in end-of-life decision making in Norway. All three participant groups experienced ethical problems involving the adequacy of health care for elderly (...)
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  42.  48
    The Case for Kidney Donation Before End-of-Life Care.Paul E. Morrissey - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):1-8.
    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) is associated with many problems, including ischemic injury, high rates of delayed allograft function, and frequent organ discard. Furthermore, many potential DCD donors fail to progress to asystole in a manner that would enable safe organ transplantation and no organs are recovered. DCD protocols are based upon the principle that the donor must be declared dead prior to organ recovery. A new protocol is proposed whereby after a donor family agrees to withdrawal of life-sustaining (...)
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  43.  7
    The end of life as we know it: ominous news from the frontiers of science.Michael Guillen - 2018 - Washington, DC: Salem Books, an imprint of Regnery Publishing.
    In nearly all aspects of life, humans are crossing lines of no return. Modern science is leading us into vast uncharted territory—far beyond the invention of nuclear weapons or taking us to the moon.Today, in labs all over the world, scientists are performing experiments that threaten to fundamentally alter the practical character and ethical color of our everyday lives. In The End of Life as We Know It, bestselling author Michael Guillen takes a penetrating look at how the (...)
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  44.  25
    Introduction: the end of the welfare state?Bent Greve - 2003 - The European Legacy 8 (5):557-558.
    The welfare state has been said to be in crisis many times. Many have predicted the death of the patient, but without having made a proper diagnosis. Reasons for such crises, it has been argued, have been globalisation, change in demography, lack of legitimacy and lack of ability to.nance public sector activities. As the articles in this issue show, however, despite the many changes it seems that welfare states are alive and kicking. Changes, adaptation, recasting, recalibration and restructuring are some (...)
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  45.  37
    Ethical frameworks for surrogates’ end-of-life planning experiences.Hyejin Kim, Janet A. Deatrick & Connie M. Ulrich - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (1):46-69.
    Background:Despite the growing body of knowledge about surrogate decision making, we know very little about the use of ethical frameworks (including ethical theories, principles, and concepts) to understand surrogates’ day-to-day experiences in end-of-life care planning for incapacitated adults.Objectives and Methods:This qualitative systematic review was conducted to identify the types of ethical frameworks used to address surrogates’ experiences in end-of-life care planning for incapacitated adults as well as the most common themes or patterns found in surrogate decision-making research.Findings:Seven research (...)
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  46.  40
    End-of-life care in The Netherlands and the United States: a comparison of values, justifications, and practices.Timothy E. Quill & Gerrit Kimsma - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):189-.
    Voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide remain technically illegal in the Netherlands, but the practices are openly tolerated provided that physicians adhere to carefully constructed guidelines. Harsh criticism of the Dutch practice by authors in the United States and Great Britain has made achieving a balanced understanding of its clinical, moral, and policy implications very difficult. Similar practice patterns probably exist in the United States, but they are conducted in secret because of a more uncertain legal and ethical climate. In (...)
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  47.  5
    End-of-life Care for Children.Paula Froio - 2022 - Ethics and Medics 47 (9):1-4.
    Parents have the autonomous right to choose or refuse a treatment for their child, even those that are life sustaining, if it is extraordinary or disproportionate and it is within the best interest and well-being of their child. Pediatric health care is practiced with the goal of promoting the best interests of the child to do so. Treatment is generally rendered under a presumption in favor of sustaining life. However, in some circumstances, the balance of benefits and burdens (...)
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  48.  68
    Understanding end‐of‐life caring practices in the emergency department: developing Merleau‐Ponty's notions of intentional arc and maximum grip through praxis and phronesis.Garrett K. Chan - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):19-32.
    The emergency department (ED) is a fast-paced, highly stressful environment where clinicians function with little or suboptimal information and where time is measured in minutes and hours. In addition, death and dying are phenomena that are often experienced in the ED. Current end-of-life care models, based on chronic illness trajectories, may be difficult to apply in the ED. A philosophical approach examining end-of-life care may help us understand how core medical and nursing values are embodied as care practices (...)
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  49. Ethics of End-of-Life Care: The Need for Improved Communication among Physicians, Patients, and Families.D. Passigli, R. Sarkar, S. Paul, Pamela Saha & Subrata Saha - 2011 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 2 (1):45-69.
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  50.  24
    Intentions at the End of Life: Continuous Deep Sedation and France’s Claeys-Leonetti law.Steven Farrelly-Jackson - 2024 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 49 (1):43-57.
    In 2016, France passed a major law that is unique in giving terminally ill and suffering patients the right to the controversial procedure of continuous deep sedation until death (CDS). In so doing, the law identifies CDS as a sui generis clinical practice, distinct from other forms of palliative sedation therapy, as well as from euthanasia. As such, it reconfigures the ethical debate over CDS in interesting ways. This paper addresses one aspect of this reconfiguration and its implications for the (...)
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