Results for 'factory farming'

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  1. What's Wrong with Factory Farming?Jonny Anomaly - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (3):246-254.
    Factory farming continues to grow around the world as a low-cost way of producing animal products for human consumption. However, many of the practices associated with intensive animal farming have been criticized by public health professionals and animal welfare advocates. The aim of this essay is to raise three independent moral concerns with factory farming, and to explain why the practices associated with factory farming flourish despite the cruelty inflicted on animals and the (...)
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  2. Factory Farming and Ethical Veganism.Eugene Mills - 2019 - Acta Analytica 34 (4):385-406.
    The most compelling arguments for ethical veganism hinge on premise-pairs linking the serious wrongness of factory farming to that of buying its products: one premise claiming that buying those products stands in a certain relation to factory farming itself, and one claiming that entering into that relation with a seriously wrong practice is itself wrong. I argue that all such “linkage arguments” on offer fail, granting the serious wrongness of factory farming. Each relevant relation (...)
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  3. Factory Farming and the Interests of Animals.Desires Are Possible - 1991 - In Charles V. Blatz (ed.), Ethics and agriculture: an anthology on current issues in world context. Moscow, Idaho: University of Idaho Press.
     
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  4. Factory Farming and Consumer Complicity.Adrienne Martin - 2015 - In Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo & Matthew Halteman (eds.), Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments About the Ethics of Eating. pp. 203-14.
  5. Factory Farming: A Moral Issue.Peter Singer - unknown
    There is a growing consensus that factory farming of animals — also known as CAFOs, or concentrated animal feeding operations — is morally wrong. The American animal rights movement, which in its early years focused largely on the use of animals in research, now has come to see that factory farming represents by far the greater abuse of animals. The numbers speak for themselves. In the United States somewhere between 20 million and 40 million birds and (...)
     
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  6. Factory farming.Paul Waldau - 1998 - In Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press. pp. 168--69.
     
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  7.  61
    Beyond Biopolitics: Animal Studies, Factory Farms, and the Advent of Deading Life.James Stanescu - 2013 - PhaenEx 8 (2):135.
    This article seeks to do two things: articulate the function of biopolitics as a necessary correlate to human exceptionalism, and argue for the factory farm as a supplementary inverse of biopolitical logic. Human exceptionalism is based fundamentally in a desire to create protected lives, and lives that can be, or even need to be, exterminated. In other words, human exceptionalism is the very definition of biopolitics. However, biopolitical theory was mostly developed around thinking through issues of human genocides, particularly (...)
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  8. On a Failed Defense of Factory Farming.Stephen Puryear, Stijn Bruers & László Erdős - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):311-323.
    Timothy Hsiao attempts to defend industrial animal farming by arguing that it is not inherently cruel. We raise three main objections to his defense. First, his argument rests on a misunderstanding of the nature of cruelty. Second, his conclusion, though technically true, is so weak as to be of virtually no moral significance or interest. Third, his contention that animals lack moral standing, and thus that mistreating them is wrong only insofar as it makes one more disposed to mistreat (...)
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  9.  52
    Animal Thoughts on Factory Farms: Michael Leahy, Language and Awareness of Death.Rebekah Humphreys - 2008 - Between the Species 13 (8):2.
    The idea that language is necessary for thought and emotion is a dominant one in philosophy. Animals have taken the brunt of this idea, since it is widely held that language is exclusively human. Michael Leahy makes a case against the moral standing of factory-farmed animals based on such ideas. His approach is Wittgensteinian: understanding is a thought process that requires language, which animals do not possess. But he goes further than this and argues that certain factory (...) methods do not cause certain sufferings to the animals used, since animals lack full awareness of their circumstances. In particular he argues that animals do not experience certain sufferings at the slaughterhouse since, lacking language, they are unaware of their fate . Through an analysis of Leahy’s claims this paper aims to explore and challenge both the idea that thought and emotion require language and that only humans possess language. (shrink)
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  10. Is It Wrong to Eat Meat from Factory Farms? If So, Why?Mark Bryant Budolfson - 2015 - In The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat. pp. 1-22.
    Many philosophers endorse utilitarian arguments against eating meat along the lines of Peter Singer’s, while others endorse deontological arguments along the lines of Tom Regan’s. This chapter suggests that both types of arguments are too quick. Empirical reasons are outlined for thinking that when one eats meat, that doesn’t make a difference to animals in the way that it would have to for either type of argument to be sound—and this chapter argues that this is true notwithstanding recent “expected utility” (...)
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  11.  43
    Wrongful Procreation, Factory Farming, and the Afterlife.Dustin Crummett - 2021 - Faith and Philosophy 38 (3):337-358.
    Sometimes, I can affect whether an individual is created, but not how their life goes if they’re created. If their life will be bad enough, I apparently wrong them by allowing their creation. But sometimes, popular religious views imply that the created individual is guaranteed to have an infinitely good existence on balance. Since, I argue, I don’t wrong someone by allowing their creation when it’s infinitely good for them on balance, these views apparently have unacceptable implications for procreation ethics. (...)
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  12. The Dangers of Factory Farming.Bradley S. Miller - 1988 - Business and Society Review 65:44.
     
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  13. Down on the factory farm.Peter Singer - 1989 - In Tom Regan & Peter Singer (eds.), Animal Rights and Human Obligations. pp. 159--168.
     
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  14. Developing an objective measure of knowledge of factory farming.Adam Feltz, Jacob N. Caton, Zac Cogley, Mylan Engel, Silke Feltz, Ramona Ilea, L. Syd M. Johnson & Tom Offer-Westort - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 37 (2).
    Knowledge of human uses of animals is an important, but understudied, aspect of how humans treat animals. We developed a measure of one kind of knowledge of human uses of animals – knowledge of factory farming. Studies 1 (N = 270) and 2 (N = 270) tested an initial battery of objective, true or false statements about factory farming using Item Response Theory. Studies 3 (N = 241) and 4 (N = 278) provided evidence that responses (...)
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  15. Meat and Morality: Alternatives to Factory Farming[REVIEW]Evelyn B. Pluhar - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):455-468.
    Scientists have shown that the practice of factory farming is an increasingly urgent danger to human health, the environment, and nonhuman animal welfare. For all these reasons, moral agents must consider alternatives. Vegetarian food production, humane food animal farming, and in-vitro meat production are all explored from a variety of ethical perspectives, especially utilitarian and rights-based viewpoints, all in the light of current U.S. and European initiatives in the public and private sectors. It is concluded that vegetarianism (...)
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  16.  43
    Michael Morris: Factory Farming and Animal Liberation in New Zealand: Earl of Seacliff Art Workshop. Wellington NZ, 2011. meBooks. ISBN: 978-0-9876536. [REVIEW]Dennis Keeney - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):633-634.
    Michael Morris: Factory Farming and Animal Liberation in New Zealand Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9327-1 Authors Dennis Keeney, Emeritus Professor, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  17.  43
    Critical examination of the moral status of animals, with particular reference to the practices of factory farming and animal experimentation.Rebekah Humphreys - unknown
    There is extensive literature that indicates animals suffer considerably in the practices of factory farming and animal experimentation. In the light of the evidence of this suffering there is an urgent need to answer the question whether our current use of animals is ever morally justifiable. The aim of this thesis is to provide a critical examination of the moral status of animals and of our treatment of animals in these practices. My objective is to assess whether these (...)
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  18.  52
    Varieties of the Cruelty-Based Objection to Factory Farming.Christopher Bobier - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (3):377-390.
    Timothy Hsiao defends industrial animal agriculture from the “strongest version of the cruelty objection” :37–54, 2017). The cruelty objection, following Rachels Food for thought: the debate over eating meat, Prometheus, Amherst, 2004), is that, because it is wrong to cause pain without a morally good reason, and there is no morally good reason for the pain caused in factory farming, factory farming is morally indefensible.In this paper, I do not directly engage Hsiao’s argument for the moral (...)
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  19. Affected ignorance and animal suffering: Why our failure to debate factory farming puts us at moral risk. [REVIEW]Nancy M. Williams - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):371-384.
    It is widely recognized that our social and moral environments influence our actions and belief formations. We are never fully immune to the effects of cultural membership. What is not clear, however, is whether these influences excuse average moral agents who fail to scrutinize conventional norms. In this paper, I argue that the lack of extensive public debate about factory farming and, its corollary, extreme animal suffering, is probably due, in part, to affected ignorance. Although a complex phenomenon (...)
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  20.  44
    Causal Inefficacy and Utilitarian Arguments Against the Consumption of Factory-Farmed Products.Moti Gorin - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):585-594.
    Utilitarian objections to the consumption of factory-farmed products center primarily on the harms such farms cause to animals. One problem with the utilitarian case against the consumption of factory-farmed products is that the system of production is so vast and complex that no typical, individual consumer can, through her consumer behavior, make any difference to the welfare of animals. I grant for the sake of argument that this causal inefficacy objection is sound and go on to argue that (...)
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  21.  17
    Protections without Rights: A Liberal Indictment of Factory Farming.Connor Kianpour - 2021 - Dissertation, Georgia State University
    I argue that factory farming should be abolished consistent with the principles of classical liberalism. To make my case, I first argue that anti-cruelty is a commitment of classical liberalism. In Section 3, I explain how the commitments of classical liberalism, including a commitment to anti-cruelty, give us weighty reasons to abolish factory farming. Then, I consider and respond to the objection that the property rights of factory farmers override the strength of reasons for the (...)
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  22.  88
    Old McDonald’s Had a Farm: The Metaphysics of Factory Farming.Drew Leder - 2012 - Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (1):73-86.
    This article explores the cultural and philosophical foundations of factory farming. Modes of capitalist production play a role: Marx’s analysis of the fourfold alienation of labor can be applied to animal-laborers. However, the harshness with which animals are treated exceeds the harshness directed toward human workers. At root is a cultural anthropocentrism that prohibits viewing animals as moral subjects, removing ethical restraints. Ultimately, the modernist ways in which animals are treated as both like and unlike human workers are (...)
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  23.  35
    Unlikely allies against factory farms: animal rights advocates and environmentalists. [REVIEW]David M. Holt - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):169-171.
    I examine the risks and opportunities associated with social movement coalition building in attempts to block or curtail the rise of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in the United States. As producers have scaled up animal production facilities, environmentalists and animal rights activists, along with numerous other social actors, have begun anti-CAFO campaigns. I argue that while the CAFO has mobilized a diverse group of social actors, these individuals and organizations do not all have the same interests (aside from resistance (...)
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  24. From the marketplace to the dinner plate: The economy, theology, and factory farming[REVIEW]Rose Zuzworsky - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):177 - 188.
    Factory farming is big business. Since the "products" of factoryfarming are living, breathing, sentient creatures, particular ethical issues are raised in a market system based on efficiency, productivity, costs of production, and profit. This paper focuses on the question of weather food animals in the American market system are subjected to unnecessary pain and suffering before they make it to our dinner plates. The single most important consideration, then, is an exploration of the extent to which economic considerations (...)
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  25. On the Ill-Being of Animals: From Factory Farm to Forever Home.Cheryl Abbate & C. Abbate - 2022 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 46 (1):325-353.
    Animal welfare theorists tend to assume that most animals in captivity—especially those living in our homes and in sanctuaries—can, with sufficient care and environmental enrichment, live genuinely good lives. This misguided belief stems from the view that animal well-being should be assessed only in terms of the felt experiences of animals. Against this view, I argue that in assessing how well an animal’s life is going, we ought to consider two distinct kinds of welfare: experiential welfare and subject welfare. Once (...)
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  26.  13
    Alex Blanchette: Porkopolis: American animality, standardized life, and the factory farm.Michaela Hoffelmeyer - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):497-498.
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  27.  10
    Alex Blanchette: Porkopolis: American animality, standardized life, and the factory farm: Duke University Press, Durham, North Carolina, 2020, 298 pp, ISBN 9781478008408. [REVIEW]Michaela Hoffelmeyer - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):497-498.
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  28.  10
    Every Farm a Factory: The Industrial Ideal in American Agriculture. [REVIEW]Michael Strauss - 2004 - Isis 95:719-719.
  29. Industrial Farm Animal Production: A Comprehensive Moral Critique.John Rossi & Samual A. Garner - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):479-522.
    Over the past century, animal agriculture in the United States has transformed from a system of small, family farms to a largely industrialized model—often known as ‘industrial farm animal production’ (IFAP). This model has successfully produced a large supply of cheap meat, eggs and dairy products, but at significant costs to animal welfare, the environment, the risk of zoonotic disease, the economic and social health of rural communities, and overall food abundance. Over the past 40 years, numerous critiques of IFAP (...)
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  30.  21
    Deborah Fitzgerald. Every Farm a Factory: The Industrial Ideal in American Agriculture. xi + 242 pp., illus., app., index. New Haven, Conn./London: Yale University Press, 2003. $45. [REVIEW]Michael Strauss - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):719-719.
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  31.  26
    Palliative Farming.Ole Martin Moen & Katrien Devolder - 2022 - The Journal of Ethics 26 (4):543-561.
    Billions of animals live and die under deplorable conditions in factory farms. Despite significant efforts to reduce human consumption of animal products and to encourage more humane farming practices, the number of factory-farmed animals is nevertheless on an upward trajectory. In this paper, we suggest that the high levels of suffering combined with short life-expectancies make the situation of many factory-farmed animals relevantly similar to that of palliative patients. Building on this, we discuss the radical option (...)
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  32. Intensive livestock farming: Global trends, increased environmental concerns, and ethical solutions.Ramona Cristina Ilea - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):153-167.
    By 2050, global livestock production is expected to double—growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector—with most of this increase taking place in the developing world. As the United Nation’s four-hundred-page report, Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options , documents, livestock production is now one of three most significant contributors to environmental problems, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, water pollution, and increased health problems. The paper draws on the UN report as well as a flurry of other (...)
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  33.  8
    D EBORAH F ITZGERALD, Every Farm a Factory: The Industrial Ideal in American Agriculture. Yale Agrarian Studies. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2003. Pp. xi+241. ISBN 0-300-08813-2. £35.00. [REVIEW]Jonathan Harwood - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Science 39 (1):142-143.
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  34.  44
    Is Humane Farming Morally Permissible?Doran Smolkin - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (2):244-257.
    Humane farming can be defined as the practice of raising animals for food in an environment that is good for them and where they are killed in a manner that is relatively painless. Many people who oppose factory farming think that humane farming is morally permissible, even morally laudable. In what follows, I focus on one argument in support of humane farming that emphasizes its good consequences, not only for producers, and consumers, but for the (...)
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  35.  36
    Moral Risk and Humane Farming.Fayna Fuentes López - 2019 - Utilitas 31 (4):463-476.
    Humane farming, that is, a husbandry system where animals do not suffer, either during their lives, or at the time of their killing, has been advertised as an ethical alternative to the horrors of factory farming. Although it could be argued that such a system does not currently exist, we ought to determine whether this is a morally desirable end to strive for. My objective is to assess one of the utilitarian arguments used in the debate about (...)
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  36.  5
    Mercy for animals: one mans quest to inspire compassion, and improve the lives of farm animals.Nathan Runkle - 2017 - New York: Avery, an imprint of Penguin Random House. Edited by Gene Stone.
    A compelling look at animal welfare and factory farming in the United States from Mercy For Animals, the leading international force in preventing cruelty to farmed animals and promoting compassionate food choices and policies. Nathan Runkle would have been a fifth-generation farmer in his small midwestern town. Instead, he founded our nation’s leading nonprofit organization for protecting factory farmed animals. In Mercy For Animals, Nathan brings us into the trenches of his organization’s work; from MFA’s early days (...)
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  37.  13
    The Impacts of Animal Farming: A Critical Overview of Primary School Textbooks.Rui Pedro Fonseca - 2022 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 35 (3):1-22.
    Based on a sample of 46 Portuguese schoolbooks, this study aims to understand how factory-farmed animals are presented in such books across the themes of food and health, the environment and sustainability, and animal welfare. It examines whether schoolbooks address the importance of reducing the consumption of animal-based products for a healthy diet, whether plant-based diets are recognized as healthy, whether animal welfare and agency are considered, and whether the livestock sector is indicated as a major factor in environmental (...)
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  38.  18
    Relationship between moral responsibility for zoonotic pandemics outbreaks and industrial animal farms.Josip Guc - 2021 - Filozofija I Društvo 32 (4):695-713.
    The responsibility for the COVID-19 pandemic was first ascribed to persons associated with the Huanan Seafood Market. However, many scientists suggest that this pandemic is actually a consequence of human intrusion into nature. This opens up a whole new perspective for an examination of direct and indirect, individual and collective responsibility concerning this particular pandemic, but also zoonotic pandemics as such. In this context, one of the key issues are the consequences of factory-farming of animals, which contributes to (...)
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  39.  15
    Exploring migrants’ knowledge and skill in seasonal farm work: more than labouring bodies.Natascha Klocker, Olivia Dun, Lesley Head & Ananth Gopal - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):463-478.
    Migrant farmworkers dominate the horticultural workforce in many parts of the Minority (developed) World. The ‘manual’ work that they do—picking and packing fruits and vegetables, and pruning vines and trees—is widely designated unskilled. In policy, media, academic, activist and everyday discourses, hired farm work is framed as something anybody can do. We interrogate this notion with empirical evidence from the Sunraysia horticultural region of Australia. The region’s grape and almond farms depend heavily on migrant workers. By-and-large, the farmers and farmworkers (...)
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  40.  26
    The knowledge cultures of changing farming practices in a water town of the Southern Yangtze Valley, China.Pingyang Liu, Neil Ravenscroft, Marie K. Harder & Xingyi Dai - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):291-304.
    This paper presents an oral history of farming in the Southern Yangtze Valley in China, covering the period from pre-liberation to recent market liberalization. Using the stories and observations of 31 elderly residents of a small water town, the paper describes the hard labor of traditional farming practices and the acquiescence of many when, post-liberation, they could leave farming for better-paid factory work. However, in a departure from conventional analyses, these oral histories suggest that the co-dependency (...)
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  41. Knocking out pain in livestock: Can technology succeed where morality has stalled?Adam Shriver - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (3):115-124.
    Though the vegetarian movement sparked by Peter Singer’s book Animal Liberation has achieved some success, there is more animal suffering caused today due to factory farming than there was when the book was originally written. In this paper, I argue that there may be a technological solution to the problem of animal suffering in intensive factory farming operations. In particular, I suggest that recent research indicates that we may be very close to, if not already at, (...)
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  42. Strict Vegetarianism is Immoral.Donald W. Bruckner - 2015 - In Ben Bramble & Fischer Bob (eds.), The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat. Oxford University Press. pp. 30-47.
    The most popular and convincing arguments for the claim that vegetarianism is morally obligatory focus on the extensive, unnecessary harm done to animals and to the environment by raising animals industrially in confinement conditions (factory farming). I outline the strongest versions of these arguments. I grant that it follows from their central premises that purchasing and consuming factoryfarmed meat is immoral. The arguments fail, however, to establish that strict vegetarianism is obligatory because they falsely assume that eating vegetables (...)
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  43. Save the Meat for Cats: Why It’s Wrong to Eat Roadkill.Cheryl Abbate & C. E. Abbate - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (1):165-182.
    Because factory-farmed meat production inflicts gratuitous suffering upon animals and wreaks havoc on the environment, there are morally compelling reasons to become vegetarian. Yet industrial plant agriculture causes the death of many field animals, and this leads some to question whether consumers ought to get some of their protein from certain kinds of non factory-farmed meat. Donald Bruckner, for instance, boldly argues that the harm principle implies an obligation to collect and consume roadkill and that strict vegetarianism is (...)
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  44. Preaching that Matters: The Bible and Our Lives.Stephen Farm - 1998
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  45. United States Government Policy: The Politics of Cultural and Biological Diversity.Zuni Farming - 1995 - Agriculture and Human Values 12:2-18.
     
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  46.  13
    Public Philosophy and Food.Shanti Chu - 2022 - In Lee C. McIntyre, Nancy Arden McHugh & Ian Olasov (eds.), A companion to public philosophy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 175–185.
    This chapter shows how public philosophy presents multifaceted opportunities for us not only to contemplate the ethics and politics of our food supply and food choices but also to act upon these reflections. It also discusses the role of philosophers in food activism and considers the more egalitarian possibilities of food in a post‐COVID‐19 world. Philosophy can be used to assess the ethics and power inequalities within the food industry. The aim is to expand “foodie culture” into an ethical foodie (...)
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  47. Consumer Choice and Collective Impact.Julia Nefsky - 2017 - In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Food Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 267-286.
    Taken collectively, consumer food choices have a major impact on animal lives, human lives, and the environment. But it is far from clear how to move from facts about the power of collective consumer demand to conclusions about what one ought to do as an individual consumer. In particular, even if a large-scale shift in demand away from a certain product (e.g., factory-farmed meat) would prevent grave harms or injustices, it typically does not seem that it will make a (...)
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  48.  20
    The Distressed Body: Rethinking Illness, Imprisonment, and Healing.Drew Leder - 2016 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Bodily pain and distress come in many forms. They can well up from within at times of serious illness, but the body can also be subjected to harsh treatment from outside. The medical system is often cold and depersonalized, and much worse are conditions experienced by prisoners in our age of mass incarceration, and by animals trapped in our factory farms. In this pioneering book, Drew Leder offers bold new ways to rethink how we create and treat distress, clearing (...)
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  49. Noble Animals, Brutish Animals.Marcus Hunt - 2021 - Between the Species 24 (1):70-92.
    The paper begins with a description of a grey seal performing conspecific infanticide. The paper then gives an account of “nobleness” and “brutishness.” Roughly, a behavioural-disposition is noble/brutish if it is one that would be a moral virtue/vice if the possessor of the behavioural-disposition were a moral agent. The paper then advances two pairs of axiological claims. The first pair of claims is that nobleness is good and that brutishness is bad. The second pair of claims is about an axiological (...)
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  50. Beyond Dehumanization: A Post-Humanist Critique of Intensive Confinement.Lisa Guenther - 2012 - Journal of Critical Animal Studies. Special Issue on Animals and Prisons 10 (2).
    Prisoners involved in the Attica rebellion and in the recent Georgia prison strike have protested their dehumanizing treatment as animals and as slaves. Their critique is crucial for tracing the connections between slavery, abolition, the racialization of crime, and the reinscription of racialized slavery within the US prison system. I argue that, in addition to the dehumanization of prisoners, inmates are further de-animalized when they are held in conditions of intensive confinement such as prolonged solitude or chronic overcrowding. To be (...)
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