Results for 'end of life'

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  1.  57
    Forgoing Treatment at the End of Life in 6 European Countries.Georg Bosshard, Tore Nilstun, Johan Bilsen, Michael Norup, Guido Miccinesi, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Karin Faisst, Agnes van der Heide & for the European End-of-Life - 2005 - JAMA Internal Medicine 165 (4):401-407.
    Modern medicine provides unprecedented opportunities in diagnostics and treatment. However, in some situations at the end of a patient’s life, many physicians refrain from using all possible measures to prolong life. We studied the incidence of different types of treatment withheld or withdrawn in 6 European countries and analyzed the main background characteristics.
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  2.  9
    Unveiling nurses’ end-of-life care experiences: Moral distress and impacts.Myung Nam Lee, So-Hi Kwon, SuJeong Yu, Sook Hyun Park, Sinyoung Kwon, Cho Hee Kim, Myung-Hee Park, Sung Eun Choi, Sanghee Kim & Sujeong Kim - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background Nurses providing care to patients with end-of-life or terminal illnesses often encounter ethically challenging situations leading to moral distress. However, existing quantitative studies have examined moral distress using instruments that address general clinical situations rather than those specific to end-of-life care. Furthermore, qualitative studies have often been limited to participants from a single unit or those experiencing moral distress-induced circumstances. A comprehensive and integrated understanding of the overarching process of moral distress is vital to discern the unique (...)
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  3.  90
    The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.Lisbeth Hockey - 1987 - Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (1):50-51.
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  4.  42
    Family involvement in the end-of-life decisions of competent intensive care patients.Ranveig Lind, Per Nortvedt, Geir Lorem & Olav Hevrøy - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012448969.
    In this article, we report the findings from a qualitative study that explored how relatives of terminally ill, alert and competent intensive care patients perceived their involvement in the end-of-life decision-making process. Eleven family members of six deceased patients were interviewed. Our findings reveal that relatives narrate about a strong intertwinement with the patient. They experienced the patients’ personal individuality as a fragile achievement. Therefore, they viewed their presence as crucial with their primary role to support and protect the (...)
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  5.  29
    Finnish Nurses' Interpretations of Patient Autonomy in the Context of End-of-Life Decision Making.Hanna-Mari Hildén & Marja-Liisa Honkasalo - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (1):41-51.
    Our aim was to study how nurses interpret patient autonomy in end-of-life decision making. This study built on our previous quantitative study, which evaluated the experiences of and views on end-of-life decision making of a representative sample of Finnish nurses taken from the whole country. We performed qualitative interviews with 17 nurses and analysed these using discourse analysis. In their talk, the nurses demonstrated three different discourses, namely, the ‘supporter’, the ‘analyst’ and the ‘practical’ discourses, each of which (...)
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  6.  66
    Exhausting Life.Exhausting Life - unknown
    In theory, at least, we might achieve a certain sort of invulnerability right at the end of life. Suppose that under favorable circumstances we can live a certain number of years, say 125, but no longer, and also that we can make life as a whole better and better over time. Under these assumptions we might hope to disarm death by spending 125 years making life as good as it can be. If we were lucky enough to (...)
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  7. Nature, life and spirit: a Hegelian reading of Quinn's vanitas art.Alexis Papazoglou & Hegel'S. Happy end Ged Quinn - 2014 - In Damien Freeman & Derek Matravers (eds.), Figuring Out Figurative Art: Contemporary Philosophers on Contemporary Paintings. Acumen Publishing.
     
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  8.  32
    End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition.Mohammed Ghaly (ed.) - 2022 - Boston: Brill.
    Modern biomedical technologies managed to revolutionise the End-of-Life Care (EoLC) in many aspects. The dying process can now be "engineered" by managing the accompanying physical symptoms or by "prolonging/hastening" death itself. Such interventions questioned and problematised long-established understandings of key moral concepts, such as good life, quality of life, pain, suffering, good death, appropriate death, dying well, etc. This volume examines how multifaceted EoLC moral questions can be addressed from interdisciplinary perspectives within the Islamic tradition. Contributors Amir (...)
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  9.  38
    Documentation of Patients' Participation in Care at the End of Life.Irma Lindström, Fannie Gaston-Johansson & Ella Danielson - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (4):394-403.
    The aim of this study was to describe how patients’ participation in the care they received was documented in their health care records during the last three months of their lives. Two hundred and twenty-nine deceased adult persons were randomly identified from 12 municipalities in a Swedish county and their records were selected from different health care units. Content analysis was used to analyse the text. Four categories of patient participation were described: refusing offered care and treatments; appealing for relief; (...)
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  10.  46
    Defining the beginning and end of life: readings on personal identity and bioethics.John P. Lizza (ed.) - 2009 - Baltimore, Md: Johns Hopkins University Press.
    It will engage bioethicists and philosophers as well as inform policy and law regarding issues at the beginning and end of life.
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  11. The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.James Rachels - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    In this provocative book, a professor of philosophy examines the arguments for and against euthanasia, analyzes specific case studies, including those of Baby Jane Doe and Barney Clark, and offers an alternate theory on the morality of euthanasia. Various traditional distinctions--between "human" and "non-human," intentional and nonintentional, killing and "letting die"--are taken into account to determine whether euthanasia is permissible or not. Rachels presents a systematic argument against the traditional view, defending an alternative position based on the belief that there (...)
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  12. End-of-Life Care in Turkey.Steven H. Miles, N. Yasemin Oguz, Nuket Buken, Amp & Others) - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):279-284.
     
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  13.  77
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 (...)
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  14.  35
    Self-determination, dignity and end-of-life care: regulating advance directives in international and comparative perspective.Stefania Negri (ed.) - 2011 - Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.
    By providing an interdisciplinary reading of advance directives regulation in international, European and domestic law, this book offers new insights into the most controversial legal issues surrounding the debate over dignity and autonomy ...
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  15. Introduction: End-of-Life Care in the Islamic Moral Tradition.Mohammed Ghaly - 2022 - In End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition. Boston: Brill.
  16.  10
    Young Lawyer of the Year.W. End-Of-LaW - 2005 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology.
    "End-Of-Law week drinkS @ ACT Magistrates Court: Friday 20 May 2005." Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory, (198), pp. 24.
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  17. Adolescent end-of-life decision-making: family-centered advance care planning. Richard & Maureen E. Lyon - 2008 - In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
     
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  18.  49
    Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors’ Experience.Marianne K. Bahus & Reidun Førde - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (3):261-272.
    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end–of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee. However, little has been published on doctors’ experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors’ experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews (...)
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  19.  25
    Physicians’ End of Life Discussions with Patients: Is There an Ethical Obligation to Discuss Aid in Dying?Yan Ming Jane Zhou & Wayne Shelton - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (3):227-238.
    Since Oregon implemented its Death with Dignity Act, many additional states have followed suit demonstrating a growing understanding and acceptance of aid in dying processes. Traditionally, the patient has been the one to request and seek this option out. However, as Death with Dignity acts continue to expand, it will impact the role of physicians and bring up questions over whether physicians have the ethical obligation to facilitate a conversation about AID with patients during end of life discussions. Patients (...)
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  20.  50
    End-of-Life Decision Making in Pediatrics: Literature Review on Children's and Adolescents’ Participation.Katharina M. Ruhe, Domnita O. Badarau, Bernice S. Elger & Tenzin Wangmo - 2014 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 5 (2):44-54.
    Background: Pediatric guidelines recommend that children and adolescents participate in a developmentally appropriate way in end-of-life decision making. Shared decision making in pediatrics is unique because of the triadic relationship of patient, parents, and physician. The involvement of the patient may vary on a continuum from no involvement to being the sole decision maker. However, the effects of child participation have not been thoroughly studied. The aims of this literature review are to identify studies on end-of-life decision making (...)
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  21.  29
    Predicting End-of-Life Treatment Preferences: Perils and Practicalities.P. H. Ditto & C. J. Clark - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):196-204.
    Rid and Wendler propose the development of a Patient Preference Predictor (PPP), an actuarial model for predicting incapacitated patient’s life-sustaining treatment preferences across a wide range of end-of-life scenarios. An actuarial approach to end-of-life decision making has enormous potential, but transferring the logic of actuarial prediction to end-of-life decision making raises several conceptual complexities and logistical problems that need further consideration. Actuarial models have proven effective in targeted prediction tasks, but no evidence supports their effectiveness in (...)
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  22.  21
    End-of-Life Care in the Netherlands and the United States: A Comparison of Values, Justifications, and Practices.Timothy E. Quill & Gerrit Kimsma - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):189-204.
    Voluntary active euthanasia (VAE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) remain technically illegal in the Netherlands, but the practices are openly tolerated provided that physicians adhere to carefully constructed guidelines. Harsh criticism of the Dutch practice by authors in the United States and Great Britain has made achieving a balanced understanding of its clinical, moral, and policy implications very difficult. Similar practice patterns probably exist in the United States, but they are conducted in secret because of a more uncertain legal and ethical (...)
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  23.  26
    End-of-life discontinuation of destination therapy with cardiac and ventilatory support medical devices: physician-assisted death or allowing the patient to die?Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):15.
    Background Bioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die." Discussion Advances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used (...)
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  24.  30
    End of Life Choices: Consensus and Controversy.Fiona Randall & Robin Downie - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    A book for nurses, doctors and all who provide end of life care, this essential volume guides readers through the ethical complexities of such care, including current policy initiatives, and encourages debate and discussion on their controversial aspects. dived into two parts, it introduces and explains clinical decision making-processes about which there is broad consensus, in line with guidance documents issued by WHO, BMA, GMC, and similar bodies. The changing political and social context where 'patient choice' has become a (...)
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  25.  27
    Ethical end-of-life palliative care: response to Riisfeldt.Heidi Giebel - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):51-52.
    In a recent article, 1 Riisfeldt attempts to show that the principle of double effect is unsound as an ethical principle and problematic in its application to palliative opioid and sedative use in end-of-life care. Specifically, he claims that routine, non-lethal opioid and sedative administration may be “intrinsically bad” by PDE’s standards, continuous deep palliative sedation should be treated as a bad effect akin to death for purposes of PDE, PDE cannot coherently be applied in cases where death “indirectly” (...)
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  26.  87
    Defining end-of-life care from perspectives of nursing ethics.S. Izumi, H. Nagae, C. Sakurai & E. Imamura - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):608-618.
    Despite increasing interests and urgent needs for quality end-of-life care, there is no exact definition of what is the interval referred to as end of life or what end-of-life care is. The purpose of this article is to report our examination of terms related to end-of-life care and define end-of-life care from nursing ethics perspectives. Current terms related to end-of-life care, such as terminal care, hospice care, and palliative care, are based on a medical (...)
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  27.  66
    End-of-Life Decision Making across Cultures.Robert H. Blank - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):201-214.
    Even more so than in other areas of medicine, issues at the end of life elucidate the importance of religion and culture, as well as the role of the family and other social structures, in how these issues are framed. This article presents an overview of the variation in end-of-life treatment issues across 12 highly disparate countries. It finds that many assumptions held in the western bioethics literature are not easily transferred to other cultural settings.
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  28.  26
    End-of-Life Decision Making across Cultures.Robert H. Blank - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):201-214.
    As is evident from the other articles in this special issue, end-of-life treatment has engendered a vigorous dialogue in the United States over the past few decades because decision making at the end of life raises broad and difficult ethical issues that touch on health professionals, patients, and their families. This concern is exacerbated by the high cost related to the end of life in the U.S. Moreover, in light of demographic patterns, progressively scarce health care resources, (...)
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  29.  66
    End‐of‐Life Decisions and the Reinvented Rule of Double Effect: A Critical Analysis.Anna Lindblad, Niels Lynöe & Niklas Juth - 2012 - Bioethics 28 (7):368-377.
    The Rule of Double Effect (RDE) holds that it may be permissible to harm an individual while acting for the sake of a proportionate good, given that the harm is not an intended means to the good but merely a foreseen side-effect. Although frequently used in medical ethical reasoning, the rule has been repeatedly questioned in the past few decades. However, Daniel Sulmasy, a proponent who has done a lot of work lately defending the RDE, has recently presented a reformulated (...)
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  30.  65
    Understanding end‐of‐life caring practices in the emergency department: developing Merleau‐Ponty's notions of intentional arc and maximum grip through praxis and phronesis.Garrett K. Chan - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):19-32.
    The emergency department (ED) is a fast-paced, highly stressful environment where clinicians function with little or suboptimal information and where time is measured in minutes and hours. In addition, death and dying are phenomena that are often experienced in the ED. Current end-of-life care models, based on chronic illness trajectories, may be difficult to apply in the ED. A philosophical approach examining end-of-life care may help us understand how core medical and nursing values are embodied as care practices (...)
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  31.  6
    End-of-Life Decisions in Intensive Care Units in Croatia—Pre COVID-19 Perspectives and Experiences From Nurses and Physicians.Marko Ćurković, Lovorka Brajković, Ana Jozepović, Dinko Tonković, Željko Župan, Nenad Karanović & Ana Borovečki - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (4):629-643.
    Healthcare professionals working in intensive care units are often involved in end-of-life decision-making. No research has been done so far about these processes taking place in Croatian ICUs. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions, experiences, and challenges healthcare professionals face when dealing with end-of-life decisions in ICUs in Croatia. A qualitative study was performed using professionally homogenous focus groups of ICU nurses and physicians of diverse professional and clinical backgrounds at three research sites. In (...)
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  32. Managing intentions: The end-of-life administration of analgesics and sedatives, and the possibility of slow euthanasia.Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs are performing 'slow euthanasia.' On the one hand analgesics and sedatives can do much to relieve suffering in the terminally ill. On the other hand, they can hasten death. According to a standard view, the administration of analgesics and sedatives amounts to euthanasia when the drugs are given with an intention to hasten death. In (...)
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  33.  48
    End-of-life decisions of physicians in the city of hasselt (flanders, belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254–267.
    Objectives: The objective of this study is to estimate the proportion of different types of end‐of‐life decisions (ELDs) of physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium). The question is addressed to what degree these ELD meet legal constraints and the ethical requirements for prudent practice. Methodology: All physicians of the city of Hasselt who signed at least one death certificate in 1996 (N=166) received an anonymous self‐administered mail questionnaire per death case (max. 5/doctor) Results: the response rate was (...)
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  34.  5
    End of Life.Sam Crane - 2013 - In Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Dao. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 169–193.
    The prospect of death, for Confucians, creates particular social and familial duties. Short of end‐of‐life issues, children, as a matter of general filial duty, certainly have a duty to provide care and comfort for parents as they experience the limitations of old age. Death is a major theme of Zhuangzi. At various points in the text, we are counseled to embrace the inevitable, to detach ourselves from the desire to preserve life beyond its natural bounds. When a loved (...)
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  35. The importance of end-of-life welfare.Heather Browning & Walter Veit - 2022 - Animal Frontiers 12 (1):8–15.
    The conditions of transport and slaughter at the end of their lives are a major challenge to the welfare of agricultural animals. • End-of-life experiences should be of a greater ethical concern than others of similar intensity and duration, due to their position in the animal’s life. • End-of-life welfare can have both internal importance to the animals and external ethical importance to human decision-makers. • We should pay extra care to ensure that the conditions during transport (...)
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  36. End‐of‐life care in the 21st century: Advance directives in universal rights discourse.Violeta Beširević - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (3):105-112.
    This article explores universal normative bases that could help to shape a workable legal construct that would facilitate a global use of advance directives. Although I believe that advance directives are of universal character, my primary aim in approaching this issue is to remain realistic. I will make three claims. First, I will argue that the principles of autonomy, dignity and informed consent, embodied in the Oviedo Convention and the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, could arguably be regarded (...)
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  37.  41
    End‐of‐life Decisions of Physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254-267.
    Objectives: The objective of this study is to estimate the proportion of different types of end‐of‐life decisions (ELDs) of physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium). The question is addressed to what degree these ELD meet legal constraints and the ethical requirements for prudent practice.Methodology: All physicians of the city of Hasselt who signed at least one death certificate in 1996 (N=166) received an anonymous self‐administered mail questionnaire per death case (max. 5/doctor)Results: the response rate was 55% (N=269). (...)
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  38.  72
    End-of-Life Decisions and Double Effect.Rita L. Marker - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (1):99-119.
    The doctrine of double effect has a firm, respected position within Roman Catholic medical ethics. In addition, public debate often incorporates this doctrine when determining the acceptability of certain actions. This essay examines and assesses the application of this doctrine to end-of-life decisions. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11.1 (Spring 2011): 99–119.
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  39.  59
    End-of-life decisions in medical care: principles and policies for regulating the dying process.Stephen W. Smith - 2012 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Those involved in end-of-life decision making must take into account both legal and ethical issues. This book starts with a critical reflection of ethical principles including ideas such as moral status, the value of life, acts and omissions, harm, autonomy, dignity and paternalism. It then explores the practical difficulties of regulating end-of-life decisions, focusing on patients, healthcare professionals, the wider community and issues surrounding 'slippery slope' arguments. By evaluating the available empirical evidence, the author identifies preferred ways (...)
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  40.  39
    End‐of‐life decision‐making and advance care directives in Italy. A report and moral appraisal of recent legal provisions.Caterina Botti & Alessio Vaccari - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):842-848.
    The present article reviews the state of public debate and legal provisions concerning end‐of‐life decision‐making in Italy and offers an evaluation of the moral and legal issues involved. The article further examines the content of a recent law concerning informed consent and advance treatment directives, the main court pronouncements that formed the basis for the law, and developments in the public debate and important jurisprudential acts subsequent to its approval. The moral and legal grounds for a positive evaluation of (...)
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  41.  68
    End-of-life decisions in medical practice: a survey of doctors in Victoria (Australia).D. A. Neil, C. A. J. Coady, J. Thompson & H. Kuhse - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):721-725.
    Objectives: To discover the current state of opinion and practice among doctors in Victoria, Australia, regarding end-of-life decisions and the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Longitudinal comparison with similar 1987 and 1993 studies.Design and participants: Cross-sectional postal survey of doctors in Victoria.Results: 53% of doctors in Victoria support the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Of doctors who have experienced requests from patients to hasten death, 35% have administered drugs with the intention of hastening death. There is substantial disagreement among doctors concerning (...)
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  42.  20
    Navigating End-of-Life Decisions Using Informed Nondissent.Denise M. Dudzinski & Alexander A. Kon - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):42-43.
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  43. End-of-Life Experience Case Study and a Proposed Quantum Physics Hypothesis.Contzen Pereira & J. Shashi Kiran Reddy ... - 2017 - Journal of Near Death Studies 35 (1):57 - 61.
    This case study is a retrospection of my family’s experiences that highlight several ELE facets. Following a description, we attempt to explain some of these phenomena from the perspectives of science and other germane disciplines.
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  44.  10
    End-of-life care for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.Sandra L. Friedman & David T. Helm (eds.) - 2010 - Washington, DC: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.
    End-of-life care is the only major reference to systematically explore the unique medical, social, legal, political, and ethical issues to consider while providing care to adults and children with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are facing terminal illness or life-limiting conditions.
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  45.  16
    End-of-life care in a nursing home: Assistant nurses’ perspectives.Bodil Holmberg, Ingrid Hellström & Jane Österlind - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1721-1733.
    Background: Worldwide, older persons lack access to palliative care. In Sweden, many older persons die in nursing homes where care is provided foremost by assistant nurses. Due to a lack of beds, admission is seldom granted until the older persons have complex care needs and are already in a palliative phase when they move in. Objective: To describe assistant nurses’ perspectives of providing care to older persons at the end of life in a nursing home. Research design: Data were (...)
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  46.  34
    Quality end‐of‐life care.Kerry W. Bowman, Douglas K. Martin & Peter A. Singer - 2000 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (1):51-61.
  47.  35
    End-of-Life Care: A Philosophical or Management Problem?Daniel Callahan - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):114-120.
    End-of-life care became an important issue in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It was in great part driven by complaints about the care of the dying: lack of patient autonomy, indifferent or insensitive physicians, and inadequate pain control. The main task of those who worked to improve the situation centered on changing each of those variables, assuming that would do the job. But it has worked to a moderate extent only and the problem is not fully solved. The (...)
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  48.  71
    “End-of-life” biases in moral evaluations of others.George E. Newman, Kristi L. Lockhart & Frank C. Keil - 2010 - Cognition 115 (2):343-349.
  49.  62
    End-of-Life Treatment Preferences Among Older Adults.Eun-Shim Nahm & Barbara Resnick - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (6):533-543.
    With the advancement of medical technology, various life-sustaining treatments are available at the end of life. Older adults should be encouraged to establish their end-of-life treatment preferences (ELTP) while they are physically and mentally able to do so. The purpose of this study was to explore ELTP among older adults and to compare those preferences in a subset of individuals who had reported their ELTP in a survey completed the previous year. This was a descriptive study of (...)
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  50.  15
    Retraction: End-of-life discontinuation of destination therapy with cardiac and ventilatory support medical devices: physician-assisted death or allowing the patient to die?Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2010 - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
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